Aft l' Dr. P earso n had uccessfully 'removed the t ick from the a uditor y canal, Mr. Frampton enjoyed in stant rcli ef from the incessant buz-

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1 The Newa'rk Post P. M. cent ES. '" LU ME XV NEWARK, DELAWARE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 25, 1926 NUMBER 30 New York "Kids" To Leave Tues. Resident n Newark For Nearly 75 Years Dantz Leaves Resigns As Director Fined For Driving Local Politics Car Recklessly J. rvin Dayett of Cooch's Mrs. Nancy Law, who has resided N ewar k P ost Bridge ha resigned as Director of Harry Reed was arrested by Town Arouse nterest in the vicinity of Newark for nearly the United Packing Company. Were t hree quarters of a century, will be Mr. Dayett, who has filled the Entertained As Guests of one hundred years old on her next W. Earle Jacobs, Former Editor Of directorship for two years, sent in Louis Hand!off at Han- birthday. Mrs. Law was born in Aberdeen Enterprise, His his letter of resignation ahout a ark Theatre ~~;:on~~:r~~~:e~~n~heo~n~~~u~~a;:~. Successor ~~:~~~!:~:~ :~:~01:s~i:~~:~:~oi0:~~~ The eleven Tew York children, who, with her father when she was twenty T. R. Dantz, who for three and a tim,e that he does not feel. that he un cier the supervision of the New and, with her four sisters and three half years was associated with the can adequately fill the directorship York Tribune Fresh Ail' Fund, have brothers all of whom have since died, late Everett C. Johnson on The New- under the circumstances. His sucbeen :lrlopted by residents of Newark settled in Philadelphia. One of her ark Post and who has since Mr. John- cessor has not yet been appointed. for twu weeks, were entertained with brothers, John Crow, lived to be son's death been News Edito of The The plant of the United Packing lh ir haste.ses last Saturday evening ninety-six years old. Mrs. Law was Post, resigned his position at Kells Company's plant is not working at by Louis Handloff, at the Hanark ~~~~ied and moved to Newark in several weeks ago. His resignation full force yet, but the manager, Theall e. became effective last week. Mr. J.. Le tel' Scotten, expects to have De:;pite the almost endless rainfall At present she is living with her Dantz is going on a short vacation the plant running at full forc. since heir al'l'ival, the "city kids" daughter, Mrs. Mary Anderson, on a and he will then take up work with a ju t as soon as more favorable are enjoying t heir visit to Newark. farm near Ogle town. Until recently, Wilmington concern. For the time weather conditions permit the corn One lf the m wanted to know the Mrs. Law has been unusually active being, at least, he will continue to to ripen other da y if t he sun ever shines in for one of her extraordinary age, but reside in Newark. 1\'ell'ark. (This was r eferred to the within the past year or so the weight Mr. Dantz was born near Avondale T k R h E TO'n Co unc il for investigation.) The of her ye~rs have confined her more in Chest er county, Pennsylvania. He ic n ig t ar lillie visito rs to the "Friendly '1'own" and more to her bed. attended the public schools in Chester F 0 33 Y hnl'e :;ix mo rc days left of their va- Of her two daughters and four county and entered the University of or ver ~ars cation. They will leave to retu.rn to sons, three are living. She has seven Delaware in n college he made Y k T d. grandchildren and four great-grand- f' did l\ell' 0 1' on ues ay morlllng, on children. many 't'len s, was e ecte a member Mrs Elijah Frampton Has Mite lh 11.2!l train. of the Kappa Alpha Fraternity, play- ''he na ll1es of the children and thei r - ed class football and baske all,,vas Removed From Her Ear hoste"c5 fo llow: Rita Racioppi with Miss Woods to Head on the Varsity basebafl team for his And Regains Hearing Del. Women Campers whole foul' years, and became a mem- Mrs. Huey Morris; Esther Seidel and ~l ol1il Elia with Mrs. J. Edwin bel' of the Derelicts in his Junior Steel; \\,illiam O'Leary and J oseph E t. P F G year. He was graduated from Dela- Mrs. E li jah Frampton, f ormerly X enslve rograrn or roup wal'e 'n the June of 1922 and spellt of Newark but now residing in New Gal rl~' wi h Mrs. F. A. Wheeless ; Who h W'U Benjamin Swidel and Ralph Friedman e Spend Ten Days,the following summer at work in ~a ~t ~ ~, h r ece l~t~y ~~d G r~no.~e d :ro l~1. wi th :\[rs. Mark P. Malcom; Anna At Santty Landing...philadelphia. e1 1g teat y 1. \l on e~ r-... on, of Ea t Ma lll street, a t ick which Dolan, who s trenuously d ni es that M SS Kathryn E. Woods, State Recelvlllg an offer to come to Kells, ha,d been.there for over thirty-three she i. French, wi th Mrs. Thomas B. Home Demonstrator from the Univer- he accepted and took up his work on Yfiar s.. B')':on; i\i a ry ford with Mrs. Louis sity of Delaware, has enrolled thirty- The Newark Post in October of the Mr. Frampton went last Sunday Handl off ; Annie Laykind and Sadie four Delawa:e Women as campers at same year. For the past four years, evening to Dr. P earso n and com Ku rland w.ith Mrs. John Doyle. San.dy. Landlllg Camp for ten days, he has been at Kells. He is a mem- plained of an impaired hearing and All of the hostesses report them- beglllnlllg tomorrow, August 26. bel' of the Newark Country Club, the disturbing noise in her right ear. sehu to be pleased with the children, The camp schedule is planned as it Faculty Club of the University of Dr. Pearson made an examination and ivho one wo uld ha.rdly realize were in would be planned for. gro~ps of Delaware, the Chamber of Commerce discovered a foreign body in the ear. 'ewark if it were not fo'r the high- younger people: There S a time for of Newark, and is editor of the Dela- Upon the removal of this foreign pitched vo ice of either Ben Swidel or work and a time f~r play; m~stly ware Co ll ege Alumni News. body, it was di scovered to be a tick Ra lph Friedman yelling outside the play.. The~e are settlllg-up exer.clses,. M'. Dantz is the son of William T. about the size of an average pea. hop of Kells when they are playing mornlllg dips, vespers, SWims, dlscus- (Continued on Page.) Upon seeing the tick both Mrs the great game of hide-and-seek which s ion hours, demonstration classes, and Frampton and her husb~nd recalled Wi th that of the older generation, cre- Although the doctor located the tick Th e C olllmittee h h h W 0 ave c arge of ating a greater interest and ~b e tt e r --- and made several a ttempts to remove th e "i-it to 1 ewark of the New York understanding. Thoma. T. ml th, who was born it, he had failed, and he had finall.y ),otlng,rers, consisting of George Those women who have enrolled neal'. Newark September 1, 1 43, died ki lled it and left it in the ear, sup Griffi n, George W. Rhodes, Louis arc : Mrs. L. P. King, Jr., Middle- at hi S home n Easton, Md., on atur- po ing that it would dr.y ~ l and fall Aft l' Dr. P earso n had uccessfully 'removed the t ick from the a uditor y canal, Mr. Frampton enjoyed in stant rcli ef from the incessant buz- Handlotf, and Warren A. Singles, are town, Mi ss Lill,ian M. Aker, Taylor's day. His death was the e!ld oj three out. well,11eased with the venture. They Bridge ; Mrs. J ohn Kirk, Newark; years of ill ness, which began when are,till grinning. Mrs. Antoinett L. Cannon, Wilming- clotted ar~ e ri es macle it necessary for ton; Mrs. Willi am E. Unruh, Middle- both of ll S leg to be amputated at town; Mrs. E rnest C. Whittington, the knees. nterment was made Mon Middletown; Miss Ruth A. Ball, day afternoo n in the Spring Hill Officer J ames Keeley on the charge of r eckless driving Saturday night. r Reed ran into another automobile at the intersection of Main and Chapel streets and turned the cal' he was driving over. No one was injured and the damage to the cars was comparatively slight. Reed was given l hearing before Magistrate Daniel Thompson on Monday evening and, upon his pl e ~d ing' guilty to the charge, was fln ed twenty-five dollars and co ts. Arrested For Driving Car While Drunk Luther Thomas, of near Newark, was arrested by State Highway Policeman Knecht on the charge of operating an automobile while under the influence of intoxicating liqnor near New Castle Sunday afternoon. The defendant appeared befor e Magistrate Weldin Vining, of New Castle, Monday morning and after a hearing was sentenced to three months in the ew Castle County Workhouse. and flned $350 and costs. f th'e fine impo ed is not paid, Thomas will have to serve two additional months at Greenbank. Thi was t he second time that Thomas has been arrested and convicted o~ the charge of _driving an automobile while intoxicated. He was fin ed by Magistrate Daniel Thompson, of this town, on a like charge a little Republican Candidates Must File Names Before September ht Candidates on the Republican ticket have until noon on September 1 in which to fi le their candidatures or in which to withdraw theil' names if they have already filed. The Republican primaries will be held on September 11 and the convention three days later. The Republican ticket is by no means complete at this time. There appears to be less than usual inte{'est, but this is only on the surface. t is rumored that J. rvin Dayett may be pel' 'uaded to run on the Republican ticket as a candidate for Levy Court. Among the Republicans who have already fil ed are Gilpin Highfield, of Wilmington, for Register of Wills ; Clarence McVey, for Representative from White Clay Hundred; Thomas E. P eeney, candidate for Register of Wills ; Delaware S. Wright, Frank R. J ones, and J oseph H. Gould, all candidate for Sheriff; and Albert Stetser, candidate for re-election a ' Recorder of Deeds. J oseph Reed, Thomas Feeney, and rvi ng Ball will possibly run on the Republican ticket. White Clay, Red Lion, and New Castle Hundreds comprise the local senatorial di trict. Democrats Filed over a year ago, August 15, On the Democratic ticket is Levi K. Bowen, candjdate for Representative P b. Ch h for the Ninth district. Mayor E. B. res yterlan urc Frazer r esigned as candidate for Represented at Conf.1 Recorder of Deeds. The State Con-. vention Delegates on the Democratic Miss Hazel Malcom, Miss Blanche l~ st from White Clay Creek are Wil Malcolm and Alvin Wakeland dele- ham E. Hayes, Mrs. Bayard Perry, gate from the Newark Presb;terian Robert J. Crow, Mrs. Guy Hancock, Church, Sunday School and Christian W. Truxton Bo~' ce, and Mr.. Albert tll'o 01 the "c'ountry kids" have taught each night a program of entertain- when it had entered her ear more Endeavor respectively, attended the H. Vincent; those from P encader th em. ment Former Newarker t han thirty-three years ago. t was Presbyterian Summer Conference Hundred are William M. Sammons, The hostesses have been entertain- This is the' first time that this phase back in 1893, but a short time after held at B1avistown, New J er sey, Au- Harry Macntire, William S. Armgu t 16 to 23. strong, Charles Voshell, Edward Wil- ing thei r little guests royally, taking of camp life has been tried out in Dies At Age Of 83 her marriage,' that the tick got in th em motol'ing and, what is much Delaware. t will not only give an Mrs. Frampton' ear. At that time, This delegation, the on ly one f rom son, and May Brown; f rom Red Lio n more important, letting them loose opportunity for these women to enjoy it had cau ed her considerable di a- Delaware, joined a large group of they are William J. Daniels, Frank upon the g reen grass which is so a "different" vacation, but it will tie Thomas T. Smith Was Veteran of comfort and he had called on her young people in Philadelphia. Occu- Derrick 'on, Harry Rose, 1. G. Ellison, abundant in t he "Friendly Town." up the work among the young girls the Civil War family doctor to have him remove it. pying special cars t he g roup arrived John Crompton, and Richard '1'. Cann, in Blavistown in the early part of Jr. the afternoo n. Besides the regular The Democratic State Co mmittee courses g iven in Missions, Bible a nd will meet in Dove l' on Monday even Young P eople's Work, daily in ]lira- ing t o outline a tentative platform tio nal and devotional services wer e (Continued on Page 8. ) a part of.the program. The student as well as the noted speakers pm tici. Local Poultry To Be Exhibited At Sesqui pated in these services. Red Men To Frolic Recr eation consisted of baseball, zing in her head and found her hearing no longer impain:d. t nnis, swimming, hiking, with indoo r On This Satur,day 'Marshallton ; Mrs. R. E. Dickey, cemeter y, Easton. games and stunts. One. of the most Christiana ; Mrs. Nettie Moore, Ches- On August 13, 1 62, he enlisted in T he tick is being preserved and Dr. interesting outings was the t ri p by - -- wold ; Mrs. George W. Collins, Mag- t he Fou~ t h Del.aware Regi!nent at Pea)' on is going to m.ake a report of a utos to the Delaware Water Gap, Boys and Girls of County Have Sport Program to ' Feature Annual no lia, Mrs. Myrtle H eyd, Dover; Mrs. Brandyw1l1e pl'lng. H.e servecl un this unusual case to a medical journal. where mountain climbing and the Chance to Display Leroy L ynch, Mi lton; Mrs. Rachael t.il the surrender of Lee at Appomat- Home Coming Day beau tif ul scenery were t he chi cf featlire. of the trip. Chickens C. Elliott, Oak Grove, Miss Frances tox. On April 1, l SG5, he was wound Celebration M. Slaymaker, Wyoming; Mrs. Etta cd in t he left a rm a nd was in the THREE TEACHERS Three hundred a nd twenty- se~e n (Continued on Page 8.) hospital when t he war ended. FOR PUBLC SCHOOLS young peo )e f rom the various parts BOYii and girls of the New astle Th~ annual Home Coming Day will H e was twice married, hi s first of P ennsylvania, ew Jersey and Co un ty 4 H Agricultmal lubs are be (el bra ted by the members of the wif e beit1g Mi ss Annie Calhoun, Thomas Manlin, a graduate of Penn New York attended the conference together with t he faculty, who were the Sesqui-Centennial poultry show to expecting to exhibit their chickens at mprol'ed Order of Red Men and Degree of Pocohontas on the grounds of Chester Conference B. Calhoun, of Newark, to whom he ministers, mi ssionaries and other able be held at Philadelphia, October 26 to Prof. Heim at West daughter of M'. and Mrs. William State, has beeb appointed by ra Bl'inser, new superintendent of the th e n d Men's Fratel'nal HOll t hi s wa s married, on March 7; 1871, who ewark Public Schools, to teach leader s in Scriptural work. Mr. 30. The club members are afforded Saturday. Features of this event will died in 1879, by whom he leaves two physics and agriculture and to coach Frank D. Getty, of the Board of this 'opportuni ty through the assistance of the Baltimore and Ohio Rail- Professo r R. W. H eim, State Director of Vocational Education, is at be an entertainment by the wellknoll"n Wawaset Minstrels, a concert S mith. ington College graduate, has been ap P ennsylvania, wa conference direcroad in their commercial and agricul sons, J. Frank Smith and Victor C. athletic. David McMenamin, a Wash Christian Education of Philadelphia, tending the F our-state Vocational b ~ ' the local brass band, and a progrnm of competitive s port events for On January 24, 18 3, he married pointed to teach mathematics in the tor. The delegation r eports a very tural development policy by which Conference being held this week at Mi ss Sallie Calhoun, sister of hi s seventh and eighth grades, and Earl helpful, in piring and enjoyable week they have established three poultry the West Che tel' State Normal which a list of attractive prizes have first wife, who survives him and by Keller 'eceived the appointment to instruct in social science in the same Agent Ed Wilim, Jr., of Npwark, at the conference. clubs in this county. County Club School. Professor H eim conducted a whom he 1 aves one daughter, Mrs. been offered. group of vocational teachers from J ohn Harrison, of ncar Trappe, Talbot County. St. John's College. g rades. Mr. Keller is a graduate of ENGLSH PROF. HERE made this announcement upon receipt The s ports program will begin at the Delaware high schools to the conference. The conference opened yes 2.:JO o'cloc k. The various sports to be Professor Harold D. Bennett, pomologist frol11 the University of Cam of the news from the railroad's agricultural representative, Mr. L. S. 'un off a nd the prizes for the events terday and will continue until Fri- ============================ 'will be as follows: bridge, England, spent yesterday and Hartley. day afternoo n. The' other three [OO'rard dash for men, safety today as the guest of Professor Each year the railroad holds a large states r epresented are P ennsylvania, razor. George Schuster, of the University of poultry club exhibit in connection Maryland, and New Jersey. Several 30-yard dash for women, clock. Delaware. Professor Bennett was with a nationally known poult ry show. of the leading vocational educators OO-yard dash for boys, penknife. of the country will make addresses at '-- --'- much interested in the gard cl1~ at At this exhibi t boys and girls from four states in which the transporta tion company has established the iio-yrd dash for girls, beads. the conference. "New Castle County has been the that possessed by the Republican par- Longwood, which he visited yester- Three-l gged race, neckties. bulwark of Delaware Republicanism ty of this county it is of the utmost day. poultry clubs exhibit for the s upremacy of the combined club show. ( 'ontinued on page 8) Attend Congress of since the founding of the party. The importance that due consideration be Last J NF.\~T ' NJURED N AUTO ACCDENT The three-year-old son of J. R. SP Y. of near Newark, suff red ~ e v crni lacerations when the automible in which Mr. Spry and his son were 'id in ~ and a car owned by J. E. Moni on ran together on East Main stl'l'c- about eight o'clock this morning. :\ ei ther car was damaged to any ~xl e nt and no one else was injured. RECKLESS DRVNG lar nee Whitman pleaded guilty to a charge of reckless driving on the public highway before Magistrate Daniel Thompson on MondllY evening and was fined tw. ty-flve dollars and co, t,. H was arrested by State Hil!hway Policeman George F. Hayes in ;\lil! reek Hundred. 1 Phi' history of New Castle County Repub- given every official organization r ep- DENTST ON VACATON P ant at 0 Oglsts licanism has been a hi story of fear- resenting the party and the individ- Dr. P. K. Musselman, local dentist, Dr. T. F. Manns, Dr. Adams, and Professor George Schuster attended the nternational Congress of P lant Sciences which was held at Cornell University from August 16 to 24. This is the first conference of this sort that has been held since the World War. Delegates attended from all over the world, including anum bel' of plant experts from England, France, Japan, and Germany.... BREAKS ARM Virginia Thomas, the thirteen-yearold daught l3r of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Thomas Fouffered a broken arm last Thursday. T he arm was broken just below t~le shoulder. Dr. Downes i the attending physician. less ness, honor and triumph. ual voters thereof. left last week for Canada, where he "During the "dark days" in Dela- There should be no arrogant as- will spend his vacation. He will also ware New Castle County Republican- sumption by one organization of the altend the nternatiional Dental Con BRDGE ACCEP'l'ED Colonel Earl 1. Brown, United States district engineer, announced on Monday t hat the Government officially accepted the new lift bridge at Summit over the Chesapeake and Delaware anal:... BREAKS THUMB ism shone forth a s a light that light. duties belonging to another organiza- gress in P hiladelphia this week at the eth the land. Ncw Castle County tion within the party or by a self- Museum of Arts. wa Lhe seat of a great agitation for constituted coterie that may presume the change in ou r fundamental law to dominate affairs in any part of producing the new Constitution. t the county, within the city or withguaranteed to our people a free ballol out. and a fair count. t abolished ob- "New Castle County Republicans noxious political conditions that are jealous of the inherent and acshackled voters in the exercise of the qui red rights of members of the parsuffrage. ty and o,t the organizations officially We do not mean, of course, to say repre. enting them. There should be that in Lhese battles Republicans of the utmost harmofiy. Such harmony the lower counties and other citizens comes when there is due consideration also did not bear a big share of the and a firm desire for c()operative po- C. J. Wright, an employee of the combat, but we.are referring espe- litical fellowship. Continental Fibre Company, broke cially to New Castle County. "The supreme thing is the good, the thumb of hi s right hand while "With historic background such a s ontinued on Page 8.) at hi work last Friday. fall their Tri-State exhibit was one of the main features of the Baltimore Poultry Show. William Tomlinson, Blackbird; Elizabeth Burge, Middletown; Boyd Armstrong, Middletown, and Frank Andrews, foul' N ew Castle County Club members exhibited at this show. "Due to the fart that the Baltimore Poultry Show has been definitely discontinued," wrote Mr. Hartley in his letter to the Cl ub Agent, " it is therefore necessary for us to change our plans regarding our annual exhibit which was to have been held again this fall in connection with that show." "t seemed for a while that no combined poultry exhibit from the four states would be held this year," com (Continued on Page.)

2 2 Pierre S. du Pont s Awarded Horticultural. Medal Of Honor Winter Garden at Lon&wood, With Pipe Organ, Attracts World-Wide Attention to Kennett Square The enclosed garden on the estate of P ierre S. du P ont, Longwood, at Kennett Square, Pa., a place of annual pilgrimage for t he students of the University of. Delaware Summer School and a f avorite point of interest to many Newarkers, has brought to its owner the highest horticultural award in the world. The following ar ticle is from "The Christian Science Monitor" of last Thursday : "Pierre S. du Pont, who has a ol'gan with 3650 pipes, pal t!y surg lassed-in winter garden of s ix acres rounded by a beautiful amphitheatre. with a huge pipe organ to entertain Organ recitals for the benefit of the the public after they view the horti- public are g iven on Sunday aftercult ural collection, has been awarded noons. t is not surprising that great t he George Robert White Medal. of numbers of people delight to vis it Honor for 1926 by the Massachusetts the winter garden and to wander Horticultural Society. through the wide corridors banked "This award, anounced today, which high with plants and flowers while was r ecommended by a special. com- th~y listen.to t he delightfu.l tones of mittee of which Prof. C. S. Sarger.t this great lstrument. t S not unof the Arnold Arboretum is chairman, l common for 5000 or persons to is considered t he highest horticultural pass through t he garden 111 one day. honor in America. t is made possible n f act, the crowds became so large by a fund which was established by within a short time after the greenthe late George Robe rt White of houses were opened that Mr. du Pont Boston, and is given to the man or found it necessary to charge a small woman who is responsible for some admission fee on Saturdays and Sunexcepti~na lly noteworthy development days to prevent overcrowding. All in horticulture. The award is not the m.oney which is obt~i n e~ in this confined to Massachusetts, but may way S used for chanty West be given to any person in any part of Chester and Wilmington. the world. "t is felt by the trustees of the lithe award was made to Mr. du Massachusetts Horticultural Society Pont because of his re markable work that Mr. du Pont has done much to in popularizing horticulture, in extending a love for flowers, and for ment of this winter garden for the advance horticulture by the develop the establishment of a great winter bene'fit of t he public, making it poss ible for all classes of persons to garden in Longwood, his country home near Kennett Square, Pa. study and enjoy hundreds of plants which they could not possibly see Beautiful Winter Garden elsewhere. CARD OF TH AN~S Houses Huge Organ 'Ve wish to thank the Aetna Hose, "Naturally emphasis is laid on Hook and Ladder Co mpany for the growing plants, but t he winter gar- assistance rendered ' on Saturday den has many other interesting fea- aftern oon. tures, crowning all being a huge - rational Vulcanized Fibre Co. Solid Comfort - that's what a modern bathroom means to you, with hot water service, built-in shower, and lavatory with combination faucet, that permits washing in running water at any desired temperature. W e'll gladly help you to plan for these worth while comforts, if you'll just give us a call. DANEL STOLL PLUMBNG HEATNG ROOFiNG THE NE WARK POST, NE WARK, DE LAWARE, "Training-training is everything; training is all there i to a person. We speak of nature; it is fo lly ; there is no such thing as natl:lre; what we call by that misleading name is l1erely heredity and training. We have no thoughts of our own, no opinions of our own; they are transmitted to us, tl'ained into us. All that is original in us, and therefore fairly cl'editable 01' discreditable to us, can be covered up and hidden by the point of a cambric needle, all the rest being atoms contributed by, and inherited. from, a procession ' of ancestors that stretches back a billion years to the Adam-clam or gr asshopper or monkey from whom our race has been so tediously and ostentatiously and unprofitably developed. And as for me, all that think about in this plodding sad pilgrimage, this pathetic drift between the eternities, is to look out and humbly live a pure and high and blameless life, and save t hat one microscopic atom in me that is truly me: the rest may land in Sheol ancl welcome for all care." The Great Cowpea The cowpea not only increases the productiveness of the soil, but also improves j ts general physical condition. Thi!!' crop has the advantage of making a good growth on soils that will not produce profitable yields of other legumes or cereals. t is an excellent green-manure crop for vineyards and orchards. Except on the poorer soils it is more profitable to utilize t he cowpea as hay or pasture and then plow under the stubble tha n to plow under the entire crop. About 85 per cent of t he fertil izing and soil improving value of t he cowpea is contained in the hay a nd about 15 per cent in t he roots and stubble. F eeding experiments indicate that much of the fer tilizing value of feeds is recovered in the manure. t is therefore possible to obtain the feeding value of the cowpea as hay or pasture and, in returning t he ma nure t o t he soil, to save a large part of t he fertilizing value. FUNERAL A certain person, from one of the most prosperous town clown in Kent county, was visiting in D"JRECTOR ewark recently. The visitor was being questioned by a "young lady who sings" as to,. th acoustics of a new theatre Appomtments the Best in the clowl1stater's home town. '."s it a gooci place to sing in?" prompt and Personal Attention asked the '.'young lady who sings." ---'- "My dear," replied the visitor,. ~ ' "t is perfectly lovely-new Awnmgs, V\.ndow Shades scener y, beautiful lights, comfortable chairs, a pipe organ, and Automobile Curtains CHARLES P. STEELE T elephone 44 FRESH and SALT MEATS ' N ewark, Delaware! ~riiiiiiilllilllllliiiilillllllllllillllii!lillllliliiiiili!l!iliililiililiniii!lililliliiiliiiiiliililillll!iiim!ii:lliililmmmililllmii illi iiiliiliiillii1.'~ i! ~ ii 11 Why Does Our Service Pay YOU? ~!:! sfirst'dbebcause it g ives you those extrll minutes.! econ, ecause it saves you worry and work. 1:3 i Third, because we are prompt, thorough, reasonable, and considerate i~ 1 i! in tllking care of yo ur clothes. ;",,:, equipment to render SERVCE in a ll branches of cleaning, i _ dyeing, and pressing. wait; ancl we have a truck to call for and deliver. Telephone 203 and hllve our SERVCE lit your service at once..il Fourth, because we arc f ull y equipped with the best of modem.~!.;" We give 24 -ho ur service on Dry Cleaning of Men's clothing; Rush on!~ Ladies' work; one-hour service on pressing, or we'll do it while you ~ ''<':[' NEWAR' : STATON CLEMENTS & OUTTEN, nc. DELAWARE. _ CLEANERS DYERS --- TALORS ~j l '- -J,;DlllUlllllllllll1i1 11mmnililll.mll.1111lliUlllllDllll1lllllllllllJlllllllmmmlUlWlllnlnJllDlllliilnllilillllllb.11 ftj ~! Wednesday, August 25, 1926 The Buying Guide of Thrifty and Particular Homekeepers Our Big Modern Stores.a re co mllletely s tocked with every food need you may desire at very sensible prices. The items listed below are but a few of t he many varieties that awa.it your selection a nd al)j)roval.. f you have not yet become a regular ASCO Shopper. drop in our nearest "Yellow Front" Store today and satisfy yourself defi nitely t hat- t Pays to Trade in the S tores Where Quality Counts! i~(! ".. l..i! ~Big Cheese, Cake and Cracker Spedal!:!.. :: :"::h jd Rch U Chees' 25 :: Creamy e e! i i j All 5c C k & C k 6 25 j j ki N.B.C. a es rae ers ~kgs e 11 n age ~}~~;ee~:~~,~~~l r enjoys 'Cheese and Crackers. Take ad vant - i i! U'Hii'ii'ill'r'mrU.fUlUl'U'ii! iii... ; :li. i ; i;i i : : ~ ~rliii; i ;:in. lr ( ~ i ' H j' ' iir ir:i. rli : i ~ :!!ii :::: i : : : : ::::l Reg. 7c Smoked Re g. 25c Best Cooked Kippered Snacks 4 cans 23c Corned Beef can 22c You can Always Depe nd on the Brea d th at is baked in ASCO Ovens! Victor Bread B i~o~;a n 7 C Bread Supreme Victor Raisin Bread big wrapped loaf 10c 10R f 10c Underwood's can Deviled Ham ge 3 cans 25e The Tasty Sanuwich Filler. Cartoll of 6 cans 45c. Tasty Economical Foods Easily Prepared! ASCO White Tuna F is h can 25c Light Meat Tuna F ish can 14c, 20c mported Norwegian Sardines can 12!1z Fancy Portuguese Sardines can l5c Marshall's Kippered Herring can 27c Fancy Alaska Red Salmon.... tall can 35c High Grade Pink Salmon tall can l 5c Selected Wet Shrimp can 20c ASCO Pork and Beans cans 25c ASCO Sandwich Spread oz. jar 23c ASCO Tomato Soup... 2 cans l5c ASCO California Asparagus tall can 2l c Reg. 12c ASCO Ginger Ale Root Beer or Sarsaparilla No deposit on bottles. E lupty bottles redeemed at 2c ea h. ~~~. Za~Rex Fruit Syrup Jug 25c Just add water for a Pure, Refresh\ng Fnlit Drillk. A variety of F lavors. Jiiiini" j jriii.. u j rmrr-iiiri mmi iii"ni"iiiiri jiiiii!:! Uj' ii"iiiiiil iiitii.hih!.ii... h. 'ijiii:iihillill:il:i!~1 ced Tea Time!!!!!i;: :: i:i Try ASC O fo r cing. You' ll be am azed how good ced Tu ca n 11 j"j r ea lly be. i j ~ ASCO Teas ~k~ 17c t, 65c ~ : 1 Orange P ekoe, ndia Ce ylon, Old Country Style. 1 : :'l! im... ii'i.m! T :. j"iillii:liii.l iig l;~~i: l! :~"iiri~ ;~~ i~ l. i ~: i~~l.l.. iii j ii!imr" :"H!"iiii:'-!:::i:i ASCO Pure Jellies Cur rant) t P d 13c 2 tumblers 25c nsec ower.. ca ll Princess Asstd. Jellies 3 tumble rs ' 25c ASCO W. D. Vin egar big bot 13c ASC O Pure Cider Vinegar big bot 16c Mason Jars ( CC~~;i:,~efubb e ra ph; 69c doz; qts 79c doz L ASCO Coffee Peterman's Liquid 14 Discovery...., can C Peterm an's Roach Food.. can 10c Black Flag ") Both for Spraye r a nd Ye P can >- 59 Liquid n. ee t Killer ) The perfect "Cli P" iced or hot, for every mea l l C b42c Quality Meats for the Week-End Fresh Killed Ch- k 45 Broiling & Frying e ens b C Genuine Spring Lamb Rack Lamb Chops J 35c Neck Lamb.... b 25c Shoulders Lamb.. J 30c' Breast Lamb.... lli 18c All Large H (Whole Smoked Skinned ams or Half) b35c Butt Ends Ham b 3Sc Slices of Ham Fresh Killed Milk-Fed Stewing Chickens Round Steak b42c Native Beef Sirloin Steak b50c. Hock Ends Ham lb 15c and up Foods Ready to Serve lb 60c b37c Rump Steak b42c Thuringer Summer Sausage ~ b l5c Rival Brand Salami ~ b l5c Sliced Beef Tenders ~ b l5c Sliced Lebanon Bologna Yz b 1 c Sliced Corned Beef Yz 1b 1 c Sliced Cold Boiled Ham ~ tb 22 Your Dollars HAve Greater Purchasing Power in the Stores Where Quality Counts jthell'! pricn elredbe in oar Newark atorn A bold attcmpt into the r esidencc aneler, on West was made abou morning. Mr. son-in-law, Le by a noise all di scover ed a m entrance to the window. After not to make any proceeded to gai n n door, and aga Not seeming to \\ arnings from said by lvr. was fired lit glass door, Bnd Mr. Alexan opened the door the would-be in conquered he head with the knocked, it is the two men an knockout blow was taken to up. t is 'aid!l stra nger, has Elkton for two been imbibing date has been ton. spending a Foundland. Virginia.

3 25, e 1Se 15c 18c 18c 22c Early Morning Caller Nabbed After Trying to Force Entrance, Man s Landed in Jail \ bold au mpt to for ce an ent rance intll the residenc of Edwllrd T. A lexandcr, on We t H igh street, Elkton, W. made a bout 3 o'clock Tue day nlll rning. :\11'. Alexander and his >,on-i n-aw, Lee hill cs, were aroused J\ a noise and upon investigation, di,ro\' rcd a man tr ying to gain an (lltrance to the house through a side \\ indow. Afte r war ning t he in tr uder! to make nny fu r th ' attempt, he forced d to gain an entrance through doo r, a nd again he was warned..'-:ut seeming to heed these repeated \\ Hrnings f rom the occupants, it is 'aid b ~' i'lr. Alexander t hat a hot W" fi red at the int ruder through the gla~s door, which tunned the man,,';h Mr. Alexa nder and Mr. Chilles ul.pned the door a nd g ra ppled wi th t... would-be int r uder. Not being c{lllq uered he was t r uck over t he hnd with t he butt of the pistol and knocked, it is a id. H e till fought the two men and.wa fin ally given a klloc kout blow by.mr. Chilies. H e was taken to Elkton jail and locked un. t is snid that t he man, who i a ~t rang e r, ha ' been loitering around r:kton f or two or three days, and had h('('n imbibing too much "hooch." da te ha been et for a hear ing. Elkto~ Pe;sonals THE NEWARK POST, NEWARK, DE LAW ARE, Barbarous Barbers' LAndry d~t E+kt R Big mp'rovement Bills Bigger ccor mg 0 eport To Take Place, The ton or ia l nrlists of t he n ar- by city of E lkton, not satisfi ed, t is reportd on good a ut hority t ha t E lkton is to have a modern wet Lovett Avenue Road-Bed To Be Put apparently,. with the fa me t hat la undry some ti:"e in t he near f uture. n First- Class Shape This Fall co mes to t h ir town via upid a nd Howard McClintick, formed y of fi ve-m in ut ma rr iages, ' cently got Washingtol', D.., is plnnning to together ecr tly one rainy ven- erect a building, 30x60, for t he new F. W. Lovett, well-known locnl ing and concocted a hair-raising bus iness 0 11 t ho old site of t he road-building contractor, will put t he schem. lenves Printing Company p lant, new street south of the H igh School t app a's that the E lktonian wj1i ch was colhpletely destr oyed by in first-class condition this f all. This are a ll exp cted to g L a hai rcut fire several weeks ago. is g OQd news to the residents of w hile the Firemen's al'l1 ival is in Bids, according to rumor, have a l- Lovett avenue as well a s to those who t h bobbed hail' ex as well. Gids ' bobs a nd f ancy trimmings will a lso be advanced in proportion. Whether or not t he price on Bay Rum has gone up has not yet been learned. Short Slants At Elkton News Mrs. E lizabeth Herbener suffered a para lytic str oke last week but is better a t this \vriting. Mrs. L. C. Gal'l'ett had as her g uests Saturday, Mr. and Mrs. George Coyle and Mr. and Mrs. Alber t Brenniso.. of Wilmington. P ierre Vansant, of Girard Colleg e, Philadelphia, is visiting his brother, J ohn Clark Vansant. progress, and the barbers have de- 'eady been put out for the new struccided t hat this is t he opportune ture, a nd as soon as t he est i m a tc ~ a t tend t he athletic events held on t he mo ment to announce an advance in have been co ns idered and the lega l High choo l Ground. prices. Beginning on Septembe!' ], tra nsf er of the buildi ng site ananged, Lovett avenqe is t he new est and haircuts will be fi fty cents instfad work wi ll start at once on t he conof one of t he most attractive streets in thirty- fi ve ; a lthough fifteen str uction. Newark. t is an ideal location for a cents will now get one a complet _-- home. shave, after the end of t his mont h t is a nnounced t hat j ust off t he only one s ide of the f ace wi ll be Strickersville ea t end of t he Avenue that t here are shaved fo ' that amount- the new left two desirable building lots. P er price will be two-bits. Rev. M'. Edwin Beardsley, of Di playing a regretable lack of Waterbury, Conn., is visiting Mr. and knig hthood, t he E lkton barbel's Mrs. A. T. Lee. ha ve not only advanced t he price for their services to men but to sons interested in building t hei!: own homes according to their own ideas or plans may be a ble to make suitable arrangements by consul ting wit h t~ e owner, William J. Lovett, who is also t he originator and founder of Lovett avenue. Or, one lot can be bought for $375 - t he other for $350, Town water right in f ront. Sewer not far away. Also, f oul' lots l'ig ht back of t hese but facing another street, (Buy a ll the way throug h and ha ve a f r ontage on each street.) can be boug ht fo r less t ha n $100 each. W onderful bar- 1\tl iss Ca l'olinen orton pent t he gains fot' being so close to the new week-end with r elatives in Coates- school a nd but a f ew minutes wa lk vill e, P a. to bu 'iness section of town.- Ad v. ~ l i s E lizabeth Brown is spending Messrs. Cla l'e nce Palmer and 'N. GRAPE TOUR thi~ week visit ing p oints of interest J. Ada m, of Somer s Poin t, Menke have r eturned to t heir homes Dea n Me ue, Dr. Doz ier, and Dr. in 'a nada. N. J., a nd Rose N. Naylor, of Ocean. B f 10 e fte spending their va ity, N. J., were taken into custody n a n ' a r ', - Mann. will take part in t he co mple- :'. a nd Mrs. A. D. Dean, Misses by 'heriff J esse E. Pierson Saturday cation a t Garrett Grange. t ion of t he annua l grape tour, which Helen Pierson a nd Mi ldred Miller a nd morning just as t he prospect ive 1iss Addi e ~ e spent Sunday was postponed f rom last Tuesday, due \\' illa rd Pierson motored to Oak brideg r oom was a bout to secur e a in Atlant ic City, N. J. to t he rain, to t his F riday aftel'l1oo n. Orchard, Del., and spent the week- marriage license f r om Deput y Clerk - - ounty Ag r i c ul t u~'a l Agent Russell E. end.. of t he Court F rank G. Pratt, on com- Mr. and Mrs. H o\yard H.. P yle, of Wilson, of Dovel', anounces t ha t t he pla int of the g i!'ls' parents, who claim Frankfo n l, Pa., a re spendmg t her vineya rds of J. H. Hipwe ll, N. W. :l l'. and Mrs. J. F. Spa rklin, Mr. she is under age. The couple were vacation wi th t heir a un t, Mrs. Eva J., Taylor, B. B. Chase, Denney P lea s and Mr '. D. Roy P erkins a nd daug h- detained a t the Sheriff's offic e unt il Singles. anton, J acob Kes elt'ing, Dr. Alfred tel', Lorene, s pent Sunday with Mr. Saturday evening, when t he parents Mrs. Anna L. Wha nn visited M's. Smi th, and W. V. Cosden will be inlind Mrs. L. L. Shockley in Wilming- of the gi rl a1'l'i ved a nd escorted them Mahala E. Sent man, of Wilming ton, spected. ton. t o t heir J ersey homes still s ing le. las t week _ F ish and Milk Together.;\11'5. J ohn T. Petel' on a nd Miss S. Ra lph A ndl'c\v5 ha. a nnounced lv's. 8 rl"i e Sin it h, of E lkton, Md., Delia Peterson ar e spending the week hi mself a ' a candidate for Clerk of is vi sit ing Mrs. L. C. Ga rrett. The idea tha t it is harmful to eat at ehoboth Beach, Del., a nd Ca mden, Cou r t fo l' ecil ounty. He is presi i h and mil k together is entirely :-:. J., making t he trip by auto. dent of the Cha rlestown Sand 'and F li nt fi l andkemblesvill e M. E. er roneous. F ish and 1l1ilk are i r e :\iss rene Harris, of Wilmington, tone Company. S u n ~ a y Schools will hold t heil- annual qljent ly cooked toge.the,: a ~d _ ea~e n. in piclllc. at Delaware Beach, August t he f o ~m of chowd el s 0 1 i, the g uest of Mrs. J. F. park lin. mil k g l avl es. ~ l r. and Mrs. F red Cobb and chil h'cn, of Claymont, Del., vis ited her paren ts, Mr. and :\1rs. John Conaway,!'everal days the past wee k. Elkton Firemen opened t heir carnival on Monday evening w ith a la rge crowd present. Owing to n ii ny wea ther t he opening ni g ht was post pon d from Friday las t. Tuesday n ight a large pa l'ade of visiting and local firemen was held Crea med fi sh on toast or ser ved with " potatoes is a fa vor ite di sh and is Elsmere often g iven to children. Cer tainly if Miss Bertha L. Gregg has r eturned to hel' home in E lsmere after pending her vacation wi th hel' a unt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. George D. Cra ig, S. Ralph A ndrews a nd L ynn B at E lkins Park, Penna. Gi ll espie vill r epresent t he E lkton Mrs. harles R udolph and Miss meal. Hertha White, of Wilmi ngton, ar e spend ing two weeks w it h Mr.. a nd.\ 'S. Charles G. W ells. R otary Club a t t he Executive Confer Mrs. Margaret D. Gregg, who has ;V'. a nd Mrs. J. B. Decker ar e ence of t he T h irty-fo ll~ t h Dist rict, n been ill fo r t he past four month, has. pending a couple of w eeks a t New ternat iona l Rotary, at Lancaster, Pa. r ecove red and is a t t he home of her Foundl a nd. Wednesday and Thur day of this parents, M'. and Mrs. J. S. Dayett. week. Miss Mary L effl er is the' g uest of McClellandsville.\ iss H elen DeHart at Harrisbu rg, J acob Sing ma n, who was bul'l1ed Pa. out in the Howard Hotel fire in April Miss Ethel Cr owe has returned Mi ss Jane Constable is entertaining has had his store r emodeled a nd re home aftel' a two weeks' visit at opened his gents' f Ul'l1ishing!l nd Cha rlestown Beach and W ilmington..vi s Beatrice Stone, of The Plains, clothing store last week. ' Virg inia. Miss Caressa Crowe is spending t he Joshua H ua son, employed at the week at Brack-Ex. Miss Corinne J ama r is visiting Mr. E lkton gas works, f ractured a r ib by and Mrs. R ichard R eese at Lewes, falling over the ha ndles of a wheel Delaware. barrow last week. Dr. Paul K. Musselman GLASGOW Mrs. Laur a Harris of Wilmington i ~ the guest of Mr s. J. F. Spark!!n.. Plans To Save Historic Trees Washington, D. C., August 25. Trees that are living memorials of America's historic past are to ~e preserved for future generations, without cost to t he nation or histl)rical associations. Congressman Martin L. Davey, of Ohio, who is President of the Davey Tree E xpert Company, of Kent, has agreed to make this unique contribution to the records of American history. He will donate the services of ltee s urgeons of his company to preser ve one historic tree each year. The trees will be selected by the alional Socity of the Daughters of the American Revolution, at whose request Mr. Davey makes ~i s contribution. Each state organization of the D. A. R. is gathering data on the tr<:cs of its state, to be given to the l\ati ona l H istoric Tree Committee, headed by Mrs. Frederick E. Frisbee oc Sheldon, owa. The idea grew out of Mr. Davey's generosity in saving the famous horse-chestnut tree at Fredericksburg, Virgin ia, which was done at the sugg slion of Mrs. H. H. Smith of the Kenmore Association. This tree war the last of thirteen, symbolizing the or iginal states of the Union, which were pla nted by George Washington to Rhade t he walk from h is mother 's h me to the borne of his sister, Betty. wis. 1:0bb-e-d-h-a-ir..... h.. as.. b... ~~n-t -ra-c-e d to its lair. The vogue was started by the soldi ers of t he Revolutionary war. Bobbing W S a pa rt of t he general ord ers fo r t hes'e two a r t icles of diet are not harmf ul when cooked together t hey will not be when eaten at t he same CECLTON CARNVAL Cecilton; Md. {Jiggest, Brightest, Best Sept. to Sept... Amusements of Miss Marion Titter a nd f ather, and George Rothrock, of Wilmington spent Sunday w ith Mrs. Titter a nd Mrs. Flora Brooks. Mr. and Mrs. R. Brown and family of E lkton, called on Mr. and Mrs. T A. B rown on Sunday. DENTST 143 W. Main Street NEWARK A1nounces the nstallation of a New X Ray Machine OFFCE HOURS : Daily 9 to 5 Tue.day and Friday Evening. 6 to 8.30 all kinds Valuable Prizes will be awarded EVERY ONE NVTED Crawford Sheldon a nd W ilbur Lea sure motored to Better, Md., on Sun- ~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~il day. Mr. lind Mrs. Earle Brown a nd daug htel', of Newark, called on h S parents of this place on Sunday. Mr. a nd Mrs. O. J. Gleave', of Christia na, a nd M'. a nd Mr s. C. A Leasure a nd son, of t his place, went to Ber lin, Md., for a f ew days re cent ly and visited Mr. a nd Mrs. N. C Holl oway, of near W ha leyv ill e, Md. Mr. lind Mrs. Or'own and daugh tel' called on his parents on Sunday. Mrs. D. Wrig hti; recovering after a f ew weeks' illness. Mrs. Titter, ~Wilmin gt on, has been with her sister of t his place, for severa l weeks. M'. a nd Ml s:-o. J. Cleaver, of Christia na, s pent. Sunday evening with her pll rents, M '. and Mrs. C. A L easure, of this place. There will be -;;-preaching at t he Pencadel' Pl'esbytel'ian hurch Sunday, Aug ust 29th, owi ng to the absence of the pastor, Rev. J. Mc Murray, who is biking his vacation... _-- this month "'" "The history of the wo rl~ the biography of great men. is Don't Swat The Fly-- t's lost motion- for he always comes back. Come here and load up with our famous MOSQUTO AND FLY SPRA Y - and the problem's solved! t's safe, sure and cheap_ FOR EARL Y FALL PLANTNG. Turnip, Fall Radish, Kale, Spinach - Now in Stock. THOMAS A. POTTS THE HARDWARE MAN OF NEWARK Annoancing an outatanjing improvement in travel convenience Bellinning Auauat 29th MOTOR COACH SERVCE will be established by the Baltimore & Ohio direct from trainside at Jersey City to two new stations in the "Heart of New York City" COA~:!!N2~~:'c:. ~:: ~ a~( commodious motor coaches will be placed in operation for the exclusive use of Baltimore & Ohio patrons, entering or leaving New York City. On arrival in J ersey City, you Btep (rom your train into the waiting motor coach wh ich will toke you and your hand baggage direct to the heart o( New York's activities, with choice of two routes. Coach stations will be located in the Pershing Square Building on 42nd Street, opposite Grand Central " erminal, al80 in the W aldorf-astoria Hotel, convenient to the uptown business, hotel and shopping districts, subway and su ~(a c.. lines. No additional charge_ Regular schedules, over fixed routes, uptown and downtown New York, will be maintained between these coach stations and the J ersey City train terminal_ This service will provide the traveling public with a personal convenience heretofore not available. For in(;,rmation and reservllt;on., apply to localticket otent. On Au,u.t 29th-Sa/timor. &- Ohio train. w ill Ji.continu. th. u of P.nn.yiuanio StGtion~ N.w Yor'\ City. Baltimore t Ohio THE LNE OF THE CAPTOL LMTED - NATONAL LMTED 'So Little for So Much' The very words and expression we have received from many a delighted purchaser of t hese repriced M en's and Y oung!v e n ~ s Suits At $27.50 A goodly selection,- excellent woolens and patterns,- 3-Pieee Suits, Golf Suits, and Suits with Extra Trousers. Pack One A way Men's Stiff Straws 1 2 JAS. T. MULLN & SONS, nc Wilmington Men', and Boya' Outfittera Holloway Beach Delaware r ; 1 Ch~~er~~:~~ Boating, Bathing and Refreshments FREE PARKNG Dancing every Tuesday, Friday and Saturday Nights, Music by Symphonians :;: Special rates for Sunday School Picnics Phone 9.6 F-5 North East, Md.,::, ALFRED E. GREEN, Manager L ~ EVERY DAY 12th and Orange A Clover Dairy truck delivers Pasteurized Milk to Newarkers who want Sanitary Service CLOVER DARY CO. Wilmin,ton 3,

4 4 The Newark Post ssued Every Wednesday at The Shop Called Kells NEWARK, DELAWARE ESTATE OF EVERETT C. JOHNSON-Publisher Entered as second-clase matter at Newark, Delaware, under Act of March 3, Make all checks to THE NBWARK POST. Telephones, 92 and 93. The Subscription price of this' paper is $1.60 per year in advance. Single copies 4 cents. W. want and invite commun~ations, but they must be signed by.tho write?"s name---'!tot for publication, but for our information and proteotlon. "~.n~.nabs..lj!l... s.,arks. ),lff &,~ 1!11ft,.. Jurr lattr, 1Jl'rr11~.Air, &un11~int anll Dork for Utl'l1bolly_ "-OUR MOTTO. AUGUST Just A Prayer "Let me do my W01'k each day; and if the dar'kened hours of despair over'come m e, may not forget the str'ength that comforted me in tlte desolation of other times. Ma-y still remember the bright hou'r's that found me walking over the silent hills of my childhood, or dreaming on the mm'gin of the quiet river, when a light glowed within me, and promised my early God to have courage amid the tempests <f> the changing year. Spare me from bitterness and from the sha1'p passions of unguar'ded moments. May not forget that pover ty and riches are of the spir it. Though the wor'ld know me not, may my thoughts and 'J,ctions be such as shall keep me fr'ienclly with myself. Lift my eyes fr'om the ear'th, and let me not forget the uses of the star's. Forbid that should iudge other's, lest conrlemn rnyself. Let me not follow the clamor' of the wor'ld, but walle calmly in my path. Give me a few friends who will love m e for' w.hat am; and keep ever' burning before my vagmnt steps'the kindly light of hope. And though age 'and infir'mity overtake me, and come not within sight of the castle of my dreams, teach me still to be thankful f01' life, and for' time's olclen memor'ies that are good and sweet; and may the evening's twilight find me gentle still."-max Ehrmann. ' Epitaphs (Editorial reprinted f rom the August 6, 1924 issue of The Newark Post.) f you could write your own epitaph,-honestly, what would say? Very like, your epitaph will fl atter you. They usually But if you could leave instructions to carve your secret amon your tomb, what would it be?, Our one supreme ambition is something the world seldom ears. The longing of ou r heart's best is in,most instances a iet but well-guarded secret. Once in awhile, a biographer will of an ambition of his subject, that the world never dreamed Great men, serving well, r eceiving deser ved applause, go into the Unknown and t he world knows not t he persoria l that was theirs. The honor, most coveted, was not theirs. ~ o rn e 1G irrl es, however, in reveri e by the fire with a comrade, friend, of his heart, man will tell his most cherished desire. man wishes said of him when he dies is, perhaps. represenve of the best in him as well as the frailty of human nature. or illustration, Lincoln gave, believe, hi s best when he said: " want to so live thc~t when die, those who knew me best, will say,' 'He 1Jlanted a r'ose cmd 1Jluckecl a t ho l'1~, wher'liver' he thought a r'ose woulcl grow.' " That, to me, best typifies Lincoln. believe it was his secr et t escaped him in some off-guard mood. Tender, full of yet r ugged in pioneer common sense ; national and character' that his life and work made him, like to read sentiment of his. t was his ambition. n Memory's Shaft have erected to Histor y's Great,' those are the words rve as his most fitting epitaph. Speaking of epitaphs, there are but a f ew that are truly exve. But her e is one picked up the other day. Sir Chris Wren, the great English architect, designed many of Lonfinest buildings. After devoting his life to the passion of music" he lies in the heart of the city he made so beautiful. his grave is a stone, upon which is engraved: "f you 'Would see his monument, look about you.' TD:!: NEWARK POST, NEW ARK. DEt;A WARE,!B B ALL KNDS OF PEOPLE B B What A 'Difference A Few Years Make! There appears in these columns each week a department under the TMES HA ye CHANGED title of "Times Have Changed." Perhaps they have. Anyhow the four We quote from Carl and., At the Sesqui following letters, found among the burg's Abraham Lincoln, only t isn't that there aren't wonders hit something, but they get nothing. dust-covered volumes of The Newark as far back as the year of Lin, here to see-one building covers more Post of a few years back, are not re- con's nomination for th Presi. than can be seen in a day. But it had a chuckle when the man of printed to refute "Times Have dency: "Women in ballooni h takes all kinds of people to make a color who would be my janitor, warn- Changed." hoop skirts walked the streets world. One is interested in one thing; ed me to lock up the booth securely at lightly and gracefully with the another in something else ; many nights, because "they is so many com- Newark, Delaware, wind, and otherwise again t the seem to have such a few interests. s it that the day of thrills is over, that causes the people to wander by so aimlessly? wonder why they came. Huge displays, free sainples, noise halts them for a few moments; but there are no exclamations, no excited faces, no thrills. mon white boys hangin' 'round." December 11, wind. Loafers sat on bench s,. --- Dear Santa Claus: ' under the trees of the cou rthouse sn t t a fact that we are glad be- Please bring me pear of gloves and square. AQng the plank. _ ~ond m:asure to se~?a f;~e ;~ k~ow please bring me a drum and please ments drove teams and w a~~~~ ~~ st n::aa~~eos~r~;ov~d em:arr::s:~: horn and plase brin. g.me a banana. h?rses and buggi~s, glossy steed' to me. A man and a little girl en- -Wilham E. Hayes. ~~~cchhee~ to phaetons and ba tered the.b.uilding.. ~heir faces were Newark, Delaware, Groc~rs and butchers threw very, famlitar. PO~lttve 7 hat knew December 14, into back alleys barrels and t is hot, sizzling hot. Small wonder that the people are indifferent. ap~roached, because. could not recall would like for Christmas a big oranges, scraps of meat and them, became a bit pamcky as they Dear Santa Claus: boxes of decayed apple and Again wonder why they came. n ~e~~e n:h~:' a ~~nd, t seemed so good doll, a doll piano, and a little chair sheep-feet. More than a thouthe group just passing are three: a... g.. for myself. sand saloons ran free-lunch mother, carrying a tiny baby; a man,. Just n ttme, luck saved me, the Please put good candy and toys in counters; sample rooms, beel' with a heavy suit case, and a young picture b.eca~e clear. Yesterd,a y, as my stocking. tunnels, liquor stores, tavel'ns girl with coats. All listless and tired. had w~lted n fro~t of M--- s gar- Please would like a pair of skates 1'0 sh b ht k f b : could imagine the waiting Ford, in age, whtle mechamcs worked on my g g ops, oug cas s 0 eel. '" too. unloaded by brewery wagon which they didn't dare leave the car, this man and the httle girl waited Please do not forget me. d,'.. th'. " wraps, and the bag, and the baby! near me. n my idle moments, had,. lv e~s wear!ng e~ el apl on. t d' d th ' f t'l th h d b Your s truely ThS was n Chcago. ~o':n~efa mi~::r. aces un ey a e- -Charlotte Hossinger. But why do they come? Well, it reminds me of the story told me yesterday of the little boy who was such a good shot that he could hit every telegraph pole.at which he cared to aim as he rode along in the car. What did he get? He hit something, didn't he? So with these aimless ones, they Personal and Social (Continued from Page 5. ) lyn Worrall have returned from a week's visit with friends in Philadelphia. Speaking of all kinds of people, did you ever notice how cheerful mutes usually are and what fun they seem to have? Four just passed, laughing and gesticulating. s it not a blessing to be able to laugh?-l. S. vania, at 7 o'clocr, daylight saving time, Saturday evening, August 2R. AMONG THE SCK Dr. Kollock, who was taken ill last Friday morning at Ocea n City, Mary, land, where he was spending a ten ---. days' vacation, i improving at his Helen Leak, Hannah Lindell and Mr. - and Mrs. A. L. Geist have r eturned W. H. -enning Married from a week's motor trip to N iagara To Miss Lydia Youno Falls. b W. H(,l'bert HE:n ning, of t hi s town, Misses Ruth and Margaret Vin- and l1is Lydia Young, da ughter of UNVERSll,y NOTES singer, who are summering -at a pe 01'. and Mrs. S. Taylor Young, of ;\ri ss Edwina Long landed in. New May, spent Monday at t heir home :'\iddl burg, Virgini a, were quietly York N!:onday after spending the sum here. ma l'l'ied in "The Li ttle hurch..\round mj!r in E urope. he returned to Newark and resumed her duties at the ---. the Cornel''' in ::-' w York City on Mr. and Mrs. GoodWn Mathews, O1. 1la t atmday.,romen's ollege yesterday. The Easton, Maryland" r e ~u.rne~ ho":e To t he l;lany friends of Yll ung "8a\'oi~, " the boa t on which she r e Sunday af~ e r a week.s VSit Wth t heir H nning this culmination of a 1'0111- turned, ran into a big stol'm on the paren.ts, Reverend and _Mrs. Mathews, ance of some standing, was not en, way bac k, but weathered it successfully. of t h is town.. tirely unexpected. The young couple Mrs. J. R. Down~e turn e d on Mon- wer e unattended. They a l'e pending da y from a short visit at P reston a f ew days in New York and will Maryland. ' then go 0 vi it with the bride's '-! parents in Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Frazer and Later they wi ll return to ::-';ewal'k, Misses Martha and Lydia Foard r e- where they will live. M'. hi enning is turned Saturday night from a motor employed in the local Post Office, trip to Delaware Water Gap, Eagles- where he has been working for sevmer e and G e t~ysb urg. eral years. Mr. a nd Mrs. Francis Cooch, Wilkins Cooch, and Miss Mabel Lazalere left last week for a vacation motoring in the White Mountains. Mabel Collin.', Pauline and Edna Moore, of Newark; E lizabeth Huffnal and Frances Ha1'l'is, of Middletown, are enjoying a '\leek's cljmping at Ca mp Trouble, Charlestown, Mary Epitaphs should be our ambition. What's the moral, say you? t is this,-have you, a citizen of. Delaware, of Newark, an ambition such as Lincoln had? Will Newark read in memory of you, "f you would see his monument, look about you"? Will land. The party is chaperoned by some say, "There is his real monument for it represents what he Miss Rachel Shockley;' of Newark. did when he lived among us"? Mayhap it is just a tree, a build- Mrs. C. S. Pennington will return ing, an event celebrated-anything. t is great to erect one's today from a week's visit to her home own monument, yet we are doing it every day. ', at Yonkers, New York. The Tactful Art f!) the Reporter The editor was giving instructions to the new reporter. "n writing up a news article," he said, "be careful never to state as a definite fact anything of which you are not certain; otherwise you will get us tangled up in a libel suit. n cases where you are not sure use words such as 'alleged', 'claimed', 'reputed' and so forth. Always be careful what you state as a definite fact." The cub reporter was impressed, and the succeeding day the social page of the n ewspaper was adorned with the following masterpiece: "t is rumored that a card party was attended yesterday by a number of reputed ladies. According to gossip,. Mrs. Doe was the hostess. t is alleged that the guests, with the exception of Mrs. Bellinger, who says that her home is at Leavitt's Junction, were all local persona. Mrs. Doe claims to be the wife of John Doe, the so-called lawyer." j rrepa ra~l e." A Fine Little Book "W. T. Derickson, director of the Bureau of Markets, and t he member s of the State Board of Agriculture of which the Bureau of Markets is a part, should well feel proud of the results of their efforts to give ~he people of Delaware a book concerning their State that contains a brief but Newark, Delaware, Miss Bertha Gamble December 14, To Return To Newark Dear Santa Claus: Please bring me a ' popgun, and a poliseman suit and a cow boy suit. Thank you. Your little freind, -Justin Steel. Newark, Delaware, December 14, Deal' Santa: Please bring me a sled and a gun they are what want most. And want a pear of ice skates and a bag of marbles and a dask and a tablet and plea e bring a dog and a basket ball and a football suit. Friends of Miss Bertha Gamble will be glau to learn that she expects lo retul'l1 to Newark early in eptember again to make this town her home. Miss Gamble's home, until the death of her parents, was on Main street, on the site of the newly-developed part of the University campus. For the last three years she has made her home with her brothers, Harry Gamble, of Muncie, ndiana, and Allan Gamble, of Covington, ndiana. BECOMES LBRARJAi Miss Essie McKeon is visiting her ho me her e. sister, Mrs. Harry Hill Hel11'Y White'llan is ill at the hom e M SS Altce Charsha spent last week- of his mother, ;\1rs. Hattie Whiteman. end with friends at Trainer, Pennsyl- A Mar y Christmas to you. Mi ss F r ance Buttles ha accepted a posi tion as librarian with the From James Hossinger Thompson. American-Brown Boveri Electrk Corvani a and attended the Merion-Walton Mrs. J oseph Steelman is a patient wedding at Valley Forge on Saturday. at Delaware Ho pital, W il mington. P. S.-To the authors of' the reprinted letters. Did you laugh, too? Mi s Buttles attended Womc':'; Col poration of Camden, New J er,e\'. Misses Gertrude Hill, Alice and J. 1". Armstrong is on the sick li st. leg Un iversity of Delawllrt!, for The following Newark boys are enjoying a camping trip at Charlestown, Md.: Wm. Doyle, James Malone, Amos Davis, Martin Doordan, Reginald Rose, rving Chalmers and George Chalmers. To M'. and Mrs. Paul Murray, a complete history as well as much de- da ughter, on Friday, August 20. scriptive matter concerning various To Mr. and M s. Wilib m Lloyd, 31 activities and products of the three C l ~ veland a venue, a daughter, on Fricounties. day, August 20. "Delaware" is the name of the little book which r ecently came from the To M'. and Mrs. Daniel Miller at presses of Kells, at Newark, and it is' E lk Mfll s, it son, on Sunday, Au ~u s t another example of the ability of the 22. craftsmen at Kells. The cover, printed in blue, black and gol(~ with a design of the Cape Hljfllopen lighthouse is very attractive as well as highly appropriate for such a book. "The Bureau of Markets is deserving of the many congratulations that are coming its way for the merit of this book which is highly prized by all who have obtained a copy of it." -Editorial from The Delaware News. To 01'. a nd Mrs. Wallace M. J ohnson, at t he ~om e ojia t hic Hospital, Wilmington, a daughter, Wednesday, August 18. The infant died a few hours after its birth. Mrs. Johnson who has been se1'iously fl, is vel'; much improved. M'. and Mrs. William L. Todd, of ortb Chapel stl'eet, are the proud parents of a twelve-pound daughter, born on Saturda~rning. COACH SH PL-EY MARRED Mr. and Mrs. H. V:- Rhoades, of Howard Burton Shipley, at one time neal' Christiana, are rejoicing over the Athletic Director of Delaware College birth of a son ~ and at present Assistant Coach at "The light shineth in darkness, and the darkness com pre 'the University of Maryland, was mat'ried to Miss Miriam Leah ' The members of Osceola Lodge, No. hendeth it hot.". Sterling, at Westminster, Md., on 5, K. of P., including their wives, "The lack of wealth if'! easily reo' paired; but the poverty of the soul is atul'day. The newly manied couple are invi ted to a watermelon party at Or did you f eel that your dignity had slipped on the ice? f you are angry, a pologize for. probing in to YOU' pasts and exposing the fact that you were once little children. - C. T. 01'. W. O. Sypherd returned to?\ewark today f roll! Ca mbridge, :\la:.., where he has spent the past 'ix weeks. P rofessor Geo rge Brinton, who has been in France with hi wife a nd child fo r t he past nine months, wi re urn to Newark next week. Blazers thr ee years, and was gradualed l a ~t June f r om the Library chool,,,' Dr xel nstitute, 'Philadelphia. School Days will 'oon be here. Jla c your ch ildren's eyes exami ned ~ nd be Sllre about them. Their snccess a t sch ool depends largely on g-o d Eye.ighl. S. L. McKEE Optometrist-Optician 16 J'VrARKET STREET Wil mington, Del. Suits at 10 Price We have selected the following Spring and Summer Suits and Sports Coats from our stock to be sold at exactly half price. 14- Suits $ 9.00-Were $ : Sport Coats Knitted Golf Suits All Alterations to be Charged For at Cost. MANSURE & PRETTYMAN DU PONT BULDNG will ollege ma~ilicirhom Heights, Maryland. e ~B e~h S ~" ~Br~ Road, W~W. a t Ze?ley's Kn owk Comer, ~ ~ ilie Pennsyl- Fa~k l. l~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ M'. and M have returned spent at t~e s making the ' Hageman was Keeley, of this Edward Maryland, way Mrs. Paul Sh t~ rs, Misses V Shumar have mon ths' tri p to fornia. Mrs. 1. Newto been visiting in the first of June, is end of this week. to Newark, Mrs. in Anderson, ndi Mo., and ----.

5 \' dnesday, August 25, 1926 THE NEW ARK POST. NEW ARK. DELAWARE. CLUB AND SOCAL NEWS :111'. and Mrs. Joseph E. Hageman h8\' returned from. their honeymoon, pent at the seashore, and are now making their home at Stanton. Mrs. Hage man was formerly Miss Mary K r~ l e y, of this town. The Weektln Review Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Goucher, of Philadelphia, were week-end guests of Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Baker. Mrs. Lawl;ence Cann, oi Richmond, is spending this week with Mrs. J. Pearce Cann. Edward Wilson, of Snow Hill, ~l ar y l a nd, is visiting William Hollo- Mrs. John Shaw entertained a few way. friends at bridge last Friday, in compliment to her guest, Miss ciagett. ~ [ r. Paul Shu mar and two daughters, Misses Virginia and Margaret Mr. and Mrs. John E. Huston, of h mar have returned from a two Camden, New Jersey, are spending month' trip to ndiana and Cali- this week with Mr. and Mrs. A. C. fornia. Huston. :'. 1. Newton Sheaffer, who has been visiting in Buffalo, Minn., since th fir, t of June, is expected home the end of this week. On her way back o :>iewark, Mrs. Sheaffer will visit in Anderson, ndiana; Kansas City, )[0., Rnd Pittsburgh, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Downing, of Downingtown, Pennsylvania, were guests of Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Bowen last Thursday. Albert Fritz and George Clarke,.of Baltimore, were guests of Mr. and Mrs. George Phipps last Sunday. Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. R. Raymond Lewis, Chas. R. E. Lewis, Mrs. Florence E. Strahorn, Miss Doris E. Strahorn, Mr. and Mrs. David R. Eastburn and family and Mr. W. E. Weller returned on Sunday, after spending one week motoring through the Appalachian Scenic Highway, covering a distance of over 700 miles. Mr. and Mrs. Wallace George entertained at a watermelon party at their home on Lovett ayenue, Tuesday evening. Among the party were Miss Naomi Davis, Miss Dorothy Aikens, Miss Margaret Richatds, Miss Bonnie Walker, Miss Alice Fell, Messrs. Frank Smith, James Bolton, Charles Sweeney, Sam Sweeney, Wesley Dempsey. Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Cooch and boys have returned from a week spent at the Belhaven, Rehoboth. MEETNGS PERSONAL NOTES R. Curtis Potts is spending some time with his sister, Mrs. Eddie L. Miller, of West Chester, Pa., and Mr. and Mrs. RaymQ.nd L. Kramer, of Philadelphia. Miss Helen Register celebrated her eleventh birthday last Saturday evening at the home of her aunt, Mrs. of Palatka, Florida, are guests this is the guest oc her sister, Mrs. A. S. week of Mrs. Everelt C. Johnson. Eastman. Mrs. J. rvin Dayett and Miss Mrs. Lula Babcock has returned Charlotte Dayett will leave today for from a thne weeks' visit with her a week's stay at Asbury Park. sister in BuTlilu. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas ngham and two sons, Tommy and Teddy, and Miss Kathryn Woods, spent last week-end at Rehoboth. Colonel and Mrs.. J. Smith and their guests, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Arthur, of Covington, Kentucky, spent two days of last week at Rehoboth Beach. Mrs. Harry T. Cummings and daughter, Dorothy, of New Castle, James Hutchinson spent last weekwill be. the guests this week-end of end with his family, who are spend- Mr. and Mrs. P. M. Sherwood. ing the month at Bethany Beach. Miss Jessie Clagett, of Baltimore, Mr. Laurence Bet tnol', of Ambler, who has been the guest of Mrs. John Pennsylvania, spent the week-end at Albert Boys. The guests were: Mr. Shaw for two weeks, returned home the home of Mr. and Mrs. H. Warner and Mrs. William Register, Ethel and last Sunday. McNeal. Donald Stephan, Dorothy Boys, Eu- Mrs. Jennie Rllub Frazer and Miss T. R. Dantz is spending this week gene Robinson, and Mrs. Howard Martha Strahorn, of Wilmington, with Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Vinsinger at Robinson. spent Sunday with Mrs. Laura Cape May. Mrs. Perry Towson is v!siting rela- Hossinger. Samuel J. Smith, Jr., of Chesapeake tives in Oxford t his week. Mrs. Nora Bryan, Mr. and Mrs. City, is spending this week with his Mrs. Roy Whitney, Louise Whitney, Leslie Truitt, Misses May and Edna grandparents, Colonel and Mrs. S. J. and Mrs. Seeley are visiting Mrs. Chambers, Mrs. Shellender, Misses Smith on Welsh Lane. Whitney's parents, President and Katherine, Helen and Florence Steel Miss Elizabeth McNeal, of Darling, Mrs. Thomas, of Rutgers College, formed a party of Newarkers who Pennsylvania, spent the week-end New Brunswick, New Jersey. spent last week-end at Rehoboth. with her parents here. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Pond and in- Charles Davis returned Monday Miss Madge Nickerson entertained Paul Cheney, Jr., underwent an Phipps and two children, Elizabeth Mrs. Joseph Wilkins has returned fant son, of Philadelphia, are isiting from Washington, where he spent the two tables of bridge last Friday in operation for removal of tonsils and and Buddy, are spending this week to Cooch's Bridge after a visit in Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Frazier. week-end with relatives. honor of her guest, Miss Anne Scott, adenoids, Monday morning, at ~he with relatives in Baltimore. Baltimore. Miss E. M. Lord, who has been Mrs. Carl Rankin entertained a few of Milford. nderwood Hospit~l, at W.oodb~ry, J ohn Credick has returned to New- Miss Saran E. Po.tts, of East Main visiting her sister, Mrs. A. S. East- friends at bridge last Saturday even- Mrs. N. W. Worrall and Miss Eve- ~ e w J er sey. Paul S recovermg mce-. ark after spending a few days with street, is spending two weeks at man, returned today to her home in ing in compliment to Miss Lord, who (Continued on Palr8 '-) y and is expected home Saturday. his p,arents in Felton. Wildwood Crest, N. J. East Hartford, Connecticut. Reverend Henry Eckel, of Fort Midshipmen Robert M. Downes and,,'orth, Texas, spent Monday in this Albert Strahorri have just returned to tow n, calling on old friends. Annapolis after their practice cruise. ~l is s Sara Wilson and Miss Delena They are expected home this week to Lea k left Saturday for a week's trip spend their fall leave. to )lew York City and as far north a )lontreal. Next week they will pend at Asbury Park. :'. and Mrs. D. A. McClintock motored to Asbury Park last SaturrlR\. M'. McClintock r eturned Moncla~' evening. Mrs. McClintock wij ]' e ~ain at the Brockmorton ten dars. Her daughter, Mrs. H. C. Simpkins, and her granddaughters, Nl isses 'lary.\nnc and Peggy J ane Simpkins, of \\'llmington, are with her. Mrs. G. A. Frank, of New York, and Mr. and Mrs. Raymond L. Kramer, of Philadelphia, spent Thursday with M'. Robert Potts and family. - M'. and Mrs. Cecil Lynch and family, of Frankford, P ennsylvania, are visiting Ml s. Lynch's mother, Mrs. Laura Willis, on Cleveland avenue. Misses Dora and Beulah!.aw will Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Frazer and Mr. and Mrs. Eddie L. Miller and sail from Philadelphia on the Dorchester for Boston on Tuesday. They Mi es Lydia and Martha Ford spent little daughter, Virginia Edwina, of several da~' motoring in the Pocono 'Vest Chester, Pa., have returned will spend from a' week to ten days Mountains. after a three weeks' visit with Mrs. in Boston and plan to stop off in New Miller's parent, and Mrs. Robert YOJ;'k City on their way back to Mrs. J ohn R. Downes ha ret.urned Potts, East Main street. Newark. rom a few days' visit in Preston, Maryland. Mi s Rosalie st;cl returned ye ter- ' Professor and Mrs. Elisha Conover day hom a visit to Miss Audrey Pie reurned home last Friday after a two Mr. and Mrs. \\ i~liam \ hittaker, of in Lansdowne, Pa. weeks' stay at Seaside Park, New Swede boro, _. J., a nd grandson, J ersey.. Billie Fannigan, of Aubmn, N. J., iuiss Marion Skewis will return pent htu : d r.~' and unda ~' of last f rom a trip to Pitt burgh t his week. Mr. and Mr. J. P. Wilson and their week with : 'S. Whittaker's i tel's, -- two sons, George W. Wil on and J. :'. Paul Cheney has returned from :l iss Lou anti M i Allice Wilson. George L. Town ~nd, 3rd, and Penrose Wilson Jr., are spending a month's vacation spe11t in Louisiana, -- Charlc Dever, of Wlkesbane, Pa., some time at' Congress _Ha ll, Cape Texa:, Arizona, alifornia, and Col- Robert Harcourt, of Loui vi lle, were recent Newark visitors. Th ey May" New J er sey. oratlo. Ken ucky, pent la t week-end with went to Harrisburg, Pa., accompanied \Yilliam H. Walker, Jr. by Floyd Hubert.. '. and Mrs. A. S. Eastman, Miss Dick ~anns w nt last Friday to Lord, and Professor and Mrs. Rankin Petersburg, Virginia, to visit friends :\rs. Howard F. rawford and little Mi E. orinne BelTY is \"isiting motored to Atlantic City on Monday there until Tuesday. Donald Arm- son, Howard, Jr., are spending so me. her aunt, Mr. Julian Jones, he ter- for the day. 'rong, who went to Petersbul'g time with j\lr. Crawford's aunt, Mrs. town, Maryland. uulier in t he week, returned yester- Porter. Mrs. R ichard Whittingham nter- 'th i\1 i\ Dr. B. L. J efferson, profes or of tained last Thursday informally at (ay "'1 1 r. anns. Ralph Edmanson has returned from English a t Ohio Univel'sity, and E. A. luncheon in honor of Mrs. Under- :111". J. C. Ha tings and daughter, a short stay in )lew York ity. Silv 1', of the Engineering Experi- wood a nd Miss E lizabeth Underwood. nnchel Jane, returned on ivi onday. -- ll1f!nta l Station of Ohio State niv 1'-. 11'0111 Sharptown, Maryland, where.~lr s. George WO?d". pent yesterday sity, have been recent guests of Mr. Joseph,underwood, of New York they visited i\r. Hast ings' m o lh~r, w1th il'lends 111 Wtlmmgton. and Mrs.. R. Runk. City, spent the week-end with his :1[1' -. 1<'lora Collison. Mrs. Hastings :ll'. R. J. Colbert and si tel', :lliss i\'jr. and i\ll'. ~. Bl'unda e and mother, Mrs. E. Y. Underwood, on a~ld her daughter ha~e been a~.ay. S mit~, r eturned Monday from a family, of Staten s land, are \~ iting Orchard Road. _ ~l1r e July fi.rst, spel~d mg the ealler week s visit with their brothel', T. S. :[rs. Walter Anderson on Ol'ch'll'd Mrs. Grace Reese and Mrs. Mary ~art of their vacaton at Rehoboth Smith, at Bridgeville. Road. Mr. Anderson,' who is l;ow McConn, of Baltimore, are spending eac 1. Floyd/ Hubert ~t last week-end loca ed at ewark, ~ew Jersey, spent this week with Mrs. H. Warner :liss Emma Bland~', of Washington, with friends in Harrisburg. ia t week-end w ith hi family here. cneal. D. C., is visiting at "Oakland." " -- Miss Anna Gallaher is spending Harry McDonald, formerly of the Mrs. George Carter and son, Gray :\11'. A. M. Mackey, of Wa hington, this week with Mrs. HalTY McCleary, High SChoo.1 faculty of this town, now Carter, were guests last Friday of D. C., is spending some time with at Lewi vill e, Pennsylvania. of Frederick, Maryland, was the Mrs. H. Warner McNeal. his sister, Mrs. Thomas L. Brown. guest of William H. Walker, Jr. Mrs. Lee W. Warren, Mr. and Mrs. Mrs. Guy Hancock and Mi ss Els ie Monday nigh t. Professor C. O. Houghton and son, Hubert left last Saturday for Smith- / Walter Tilghman and four children, Courtland Houghton, returned last town, P ennsylvania, to spend a ten Mi ss Ruth Anne O'Daniel, of Ocean Friday evening from a month's vaca- days' vacation. Grove, spent several days last week ion pent with relatives at Potsdam, -- with Misses Nell and Etta Wilson. _ -ew York, and at Cornell University, A party of Newark peo ple spent... --:-. h h tt d d the nternational last week at Ott's Shore near Locust M SS L11he L. Wlhs has returned were t ey a en e P. ' h f k' t t R h b th Congress of Plant Pathologists. Mrs.) omt, M~ryland: The party in- B~:eh lorn a wee s s ay a e 0 0. ~e Autumn Hat Houghton, who has been spending a cl~ded: Ml sees Elzabeth Crooks, L?ra. ii month also at Potsdam, is expected L1ttl e'remm"~h,wt elsh, FLranctes WWhh~te- Miss Emma Willis is spending two ld man, ay "Y 1 eman, oue ta 1te-. ; ; home today. man and Mrs. Margaret Reynolds. weeks. at the Y. M. C. A. camp at!~! M' Vir inia Smith, of Milford, is -- Dow~mgt~wn,.as a gue~t of h~r 1;1 J'.J',. ~. ~ ss, Mi~S Rosalie Steel. Mrs: James. L. W.arren of ~iddle- ~o u s m, M SS Ehzabe~h LeWS, who S,! J you want one OJ \ tmg town 1S spendmg this weel< Wth her m charge of the outmg camp there. if-i h H :ll' George Townsend returned sister, Mrs. G. Burton Pearson, here. M d M H- ji~ 1.1 e new Fall a s,.'... M nda to stwy at r. lin rs. arvey Hoffecker, of ii; e1 0 '. dred Richards returned Monday even- tel' a two weeks' vacation at Ocean i"j ~lo.n~ B;~t1:~.:e u~t~1 to~orrow, when Mrs. Eva Gillespie and Miss MiT- Main street, have returned home af-!.! call at she wi ll return to Balt1more. M.t. ing fro~ Atlantic City, where they City,. J. F! MRS. PENNNGTON'S Townsend is much improved, but w111 Epent the week-end. i-i. not l'etul'n home for several days fl'o m Johns Hopkins Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. L. Ray Nelson Of shallton, spent Saturday a nd Sunday i'l New York City visited their mothe'r, with his sister, Miss E lizabeth i-! Mrs. Fannie Nel on, here on Monday. Naudain. :ll'. and Mrs.D. E. Strayer and t hree children, of De Graf, Ohio, spent f rom Friday until Monday with their c'lusins, Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Cobb, of hia town. Mr. Arnold Naudain, of near Mar- H East Main Street. Thomas Armstrong is r ecuperating Mrs. Louise Sentman', of Wilming- i"1 fl good line for both from an operation for appendicitis at ton, is visiting her sister, Mrs. 1m Ladies and Children the home of his parents. He will soon Maggie Jamison. f:l! return to Win ton-salem, N. C.,!=i at moderate prices. :[rs. George Dutton and George wher e he is working for the Reynolds J oseph McVey returned Monday 1~1 Dutton, Jr., returned last week from T b cco Company fl'om a two weeks' business trip to visit with relat ive in Baltimore. :'S. Dutton is entertaining, this week, her niece, Miss Alice Carmine, of Baltimore. o a.. shpeming, Michigan. }. :.. 1i"T " r.. r.... T:!.!! ihi..!! The engagement of Miss Mary S. Eliason of New Castle to Mr. William A. Gordon, Jr., of Shelton, Conn., has,r;,===========================", been announced by her mother, Mrs. )[iss J ean Webb;r has returned Lewis S. Eliason. from a vacation spent in Nova Scotia. Mrs. Sol Wilson and children have ~rrss LARSEN r eturned from a month's vacation in G EST OF HONOR the Pocono Mountains. illis. Magdalene Larsen, of Westby, Mrs. T. J. Willis spent last we lk ;\[onlana a member of the Foreign with relatives and friend at Consho lcly G;'oup f rom the University of hocken and the "Y" cam at Do\rn Delaware list year, was the gaest of ingtown, Pa. :l1i.s Kathryn Hubert last Friday and aturday. Miss Larsen had just re- Mrs. Robert Mts has returned lurned f rom France and was en route home from a visit to Philadelphia and for her home in Montana. Wildwood Crest, N. J. i\liss Hubert entertained at dinner..:.:..:=.:.:.:.::...:.:...-: :-~- on Friday evening in honor of Miss W ANTED- Child's nurse, middle- La rsen. The guests, all members of aged woman preferred. Must have M' the Foreign Study Group, were : 1SS reference. Call in person. MRS. FRANCES B. MOORE, Edith Bogdanoff, Max Gluck, and k John Dale, all of Wilmington. 8,26,2t Newar nn. M Beginning on September 5th the BLUE HEN TEA ROOM will be opep every Sunday, as well as on week-days, from 9.30 A. M. until 8.00 P. M. Special Sunday Dinners will be served for $1.00 and $1.50 Reasonable Rate. for Board by.the Week Telephone 163 R MRS. H. D. REYNOLDS, Ho.te UNUSUAL VALUES N TMS Big Zsc ~ale! For the en lire week We will feature a.ale 0/ mo.t unu.ual buying opportuniti... Take adoantag. 0/ this eoenl and enjoy your.hopplng in our.potl... ly clean.or - where the tradltlonal "Courte.,. and Service" never varia! An exclu.ioe,blend beaul».oap :Palmolive Soap 4 eake ZS C Made from he jin.. 1 New Yor.\: Siale Apples AsP VNEGAR, Z2:;~zZSC SULTANA SpiCES 4 pkg. Z5 C Thejin 1 0/ cereal be"er gel-.eroe hem coldl UnderwC4:d's Deviled Ha2l1 3 cans ZSc AUF' JeUy Dessert Assorted Flavors 3 p/~gs Zsc Fancy Columbia River Salmon can ZSG: Very delicute and 8ubtlo in taste c 'Will not harm the mos t delicnte color LU 'X CLlCQUOT CLUB GNGER ALE Z bal. Z5 C Plus bottle deporit 5 C AUP Macaroni 3 p/~gs ZSc Crisco for Shorlening can ZSc Crispo Fig Bars Z bs ~Sc A6P Sauce bal ZSc l<"anc:y Wbite Meat Tuna Fish - can :&5c: Drl gl{ulti' ~':C~ Slic:ed Pineapple ~r::~:~ 25c: Schimmel's Pure Grape JeUy Z glasses 25c: Sun-Maid ~~~~~.~ Raisins 2 pkgs 25c:.Jar Caps lona Peas Picnic Plates daz ZSc 2 cans ZSc 3 pks' Z5c ASP String Beans can 25c Kipper Snacks 4 cam 25c Blue Peter Sardines Z cam Z5c ASP Baked Beans 3 cans!l50 Royal Gelatine Dessert - Z pkgs Z5c Spaghetti Our Own Brand 3 pkgs Z5c Sultana Kidney Beans Z cam Z5C lona Lima Beans Sun Sweet Prunes Z cans Z5c 2-lb pkg Z5c " ASP Ketchup Z 8-oz bois 25c Sultana Jam A ~:i~~"p!'t~: r. CampbeU's Baked Beans 15 ~ -oz jar 25c: :5 cam 25c: S""rillo Glnler Ale ~ bot. ZSC LPTON'S TEA!-lb pkg Z5c Plus bottle deposit Or.n.e Pekoe or Ce),lon Gibbs JeUy A.OR~~hDp:;;'ti!VOR. :5 glasses 25c: lconf. XXXX SUlar :5 -b pkgs 25c: vory Soap 2 cakes Z5c Young's Soap Chips - Brillo Cleans like lighlning 3 pkgs Z5C 3 pkgs Z50 Lux ToUet Soap 3 cakes Z5c Fab nakes p/eg 250 Babbitt's Cleanser Double Tip Matohes 5 cans 25c 5 boxes 25c Oold Dust 6 pkgs 250 Satlna Tablets 5 p/ep 250 Dellelou. when,eroed with ehl"ped ce Red CrC:le Coffee b4z" Your first tnlte will prove the difference r GRANDMOTHER'S Breadpan7C Ral.ln Bread A thoroughly good tea--try t feed THEA-NECTAR TEAS MXED loa/ i-b ~4C ~- 16 ZC p~, plcg Or P."_,." -c:.,oloe.._0 "0..._ loa/oc ~-b 17c C pic, p~, '=T ATlLANTC. PACFC T~

6 ~:~t:::re.:..,... Forty-six Delaware Oflicers n U. S. Military Service Major Reybold and Captain 0' Daniel Both Holders of Distinguished Service Awards Throughout the struggle for American independence, when the armies of the colonies were valiantly battling against overwhelming numbers, native sons of Delaware fought side by side with soldiers of Maryland, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. n the THE NEW ARK POST, NEWARK, DELAWARE, Wednesday, August 25, 1926 Rain Stops Sports The rain last Saturday interferred with the local sport schedule, causing a postponement of practicall y everything in the sport line scheduled for that Jay from baseball on down to golf. The continual drizzle a ll day long made it impossible for t he local teams to get into action. The games planned for last Saturday will be played this Saturday. second war with England they were with Perry on Lake Erie and Early Dope On Del. Football s Hazy. with Jackson at New Orleans; they fought beside the gallant defenders of the Lone Star State in the War with Mexico; 14,000 of them answered Lincoln's call.to arms in 1861; they battled valiantly beside Roosevelt's Rough Riders at San Juan; and they braved machine gun bullets and exploding shells on the bloody fields of France. Delaware's traditional figh t ing won his commission from the Naspirit is s till alive. That blue and tional Guard in He was a disbuff clad regiment, the " Blue Hen's tinguished graduate of the Coast Chickens," which helped win f reedom Artillery School in 1909; a graduate in the first great struggle with of the School of the Line, 1922, Gen George, and which was accla imed eral Staff School, 1922, and of the one of the best regiments of all those Army War College, His services under the flag of t he new ' nation, is during the World War won for him also alive. the Distinguished Service Medal, mportance Of Golf Semi-Finals This Saturday T f T -- an 10 L a b or The semi-finals in the Treasurer's Cup tournament now going on at the Newark Country Club will be played of!' t his Saturday, the weather permitting. E. W. Steedle will play H. L. Haney and H. A. Turner, Jr., wi meet Roy Brinton. Last week Steedle defeated S. J. 'furner, two up and H. A. Turner, Jr., won from "Doc" Rhodes, seven up and six to play. Edward Ginth'er, the local professional, played in the sectional qualifyi ng test at Torresdale Country Club on Monday: Thill coming Monday he will play at the Philadelphia Country Club in another rourid of medal play. Scoop" Hubert May Enter Another - College s Report T he Blessings The University of Delaware football candidates have been notified to report for preliminary practice on September 1,3. The squad will not go away this season, but will do all of its training on Frazer Field. Coach Forstbul'g is busy making arrangements for the wearers and would-be wearers of moleskin that are expected to arrive in Newark on the 13th. t is reported that a number of The unique cognomen that char- which is given only "for exceptionacterterized the first of the State's a ll y meritorious service in a duty of famous fighting organizations has g reat r esponsibility." Colonel Dunn been adopted by the people of Dela- is now on duty with the General Staff ware, and today, in every branch of Corps in t he office of the Chief of last year's vrsity will not be back to the U ni ted States Army, the Blue Staff of the Army. college this season. "Scoop" Hubert, Hen's Chickens are to be found, doing Lieutenant Colonel Albert W. Foretheir full share in r endering the coun- ma ry was appointed a second lieu mainstays in the backfield for t he a local boy who has been one of the try safe from attack or invasion. tenant in the First Delaware n past two or three years, will probably transfer from Delaware. Cop The infantry, signal corps, medical fantry during the Spanish-American corps, coast artillery, fi eld artillery, War. He entered the r egular army as dental corps, cavalry, chemical war- a first lieutena.nt of infantry in 1901, fare service, quartermaster corps, air and has served in that branch ever pock, the former P. M. C. star who played in the line last year, may not return to Delaware this year. At present prospects are uncertain and what a va ilable material will be corps, adjutant general's department, since. He became a' colonel during ordnance department, CO l'ps of engi- t he World War, and won the Distinneers, veterinary corps, judge aelvo- g'uished Service Medal. Colonel Forecate general's department, and the man is a g raduate of the School of known. t is rumored that Walter fo und in the Freshman class is un medical administrative corps all claim the Line, 1915, and of the Army War t he services of native sons of Dela- College, He is now on duty ware. with the 17th nfantry at Fort Crook, Nebraska. The number of men fro m the Blue Hen State now in the ranks of the Major Eugene Reybold, who a lso Army would be difficult to determine, holds the Distitlguished Service but the number in t he commissioned Medal, is now on duty in -the Comgrades is forty-six. Ten of these have mand and General Staff School at won their commissions by force of Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Major sheer merit, for, entering t11e Army Reybold was an honor graduate of t he Coast Artillery School in as enlisted men, t hey gradually work- Another Delaware officer of distinced thei r way upward until finallr, tion is Captain J ohn W. O'Daniel, now passing the exa minations held at an instructor of t he National Guard. every military post each year, they at E lizabeth, N. J. Captain O'Daniel were appointed second lieutenants. The Delaware officers include one served as a corporal, sergeant, and Green,. former Wilmington High School f ullback, who played a tackle position on t he Dartmouth Freshman t ea m last year, may enter Delaware. Captain-elect William Lohman, who was in Newark on Monday, could give no ot her infornmvion than t hat a number of good men were exp'ected in the incoming Freshman class. Tomato Growers To Have Annual Tour of Electricity A picture of an electric wire in a modern house excels a fairy story. t comes through con duits or on poles. Once inside the walls it divides into a score of tentacles that burrow, climb, and reach, each ending in some separate service. n any house, at the same hour, electricity might be producing heat in one room, cold in another, light in a third. To yet another it brought the yoices of friends thousands of miles away. heated water, it cooked, it froze ice in the refrigerator, it carried healing through ingenious pads that curved on aching backs, it swept, sewed, ironed- and it provided heat for the curlingiron with which the housewife beautified herself for the evening's gaiety, a housewife who in the preceding generation would have accepted old age at forty and been too much occupied with the work, now done for her by electricity, to give much thought to adornment 01' gaiety. "Modern Woman," said the Waco 'News Tribune' in June, 1925, "may have fau lts, but she doesn't look as bent and worn as a 'dutiful wife' did in the old days."-from Mark Sullivan in. "Our Times." The ' reason we have criminals is that there aren't enough soft jobs to Dr. T. F. Manns Will Be One Of The go around.-life. supply sergeant in the First nfantry, S h A h' Lf pea ers t next nee S meeting brigadier general, one colonel, four Delaware National Guard from July, lieutenant colonels, seven majors, sev- '1916, until February, 1917, and was en teen captains, nine first lieutenants, then commissioned a second lieuten- Delaware and i\aryland tomato and seven second lieutenants. Of this ant in the Officer s' Reserve Corps. He growers will celebrate Tomato Day number five have won formal recog- was called to active duty August 15, on Tuesday, August 31, by a to Ul' benition for their devotion to duty or 1917, and in October of the next year ginning at various points in the two fol: bravel'y on the field of battle, and was appointed first lieutenant, U. S. s tates and converging at Ridgely, are entitled to wear either the Ois- A. For exceptional her oism on the Mar yland, at 1 p. m., fo'r lunch and are entitled to weal' ei ther the Dis- field of battle he was awarded the t he annual meeting. tinguished Service Cross. Distinguished Service Cross. The North Delaware growers will Brigadier General Herbert Deakyne, Lieutenant John H. Veals served in meet a t t he test plots located on the senior officer of the Delaware the ranks of the 19th Engineer!! from farm of Mr. William Reynolds at Newark's Ne\v Paint Shop contingent, was graduated from the 1917 until 1918, when he donned the Blackbird, Delaware, at 8.3 a. m., and Wallpaper Store H United States Military Academy in gold bar of a second lieutenant of the proceed south to join the Middle and , as the third highest man in his corps of engineer s. He is now sta- South Delaware tomato growers at i i ~ ' 1 class. He was immediately commis- tioned at Las Cruces, New Mexico, as the Green, in Dovel', Delaware, a t 1 1 will be ready i':j time. ~~~'~::sof:ee~!1;:irs~:~::~~[~ For several months during E:::~~ and :i~i~;::!:!:~:;i:{~~:~~~:'~~~~ ice of their country include: Captain she~:~ ~~~:i~~;ee!::~i:~:;~~~~;~~~;!~ The program at Ridgely includes. '....._---:;",:'.~:" _... _-.-.~~::.,:.:, immediately after the World War he Marvil G. Armstrong, assistant mili- lunch, t he inspection of extensive served as a brigadier general, but tary attache at Peking, China; First variety tests conducted by the Un i when the Army' was demobilized after Lieutenant Albert J. Clayton, promi- versity of Maryland Experiment Stawar he was returned to the grade nent army balloonist; First Lieu- tion, and addresses by prominent! ~!. Newton Sheaffer 1~i colonel. Now, however, he is al!:ain tenant Perry Wainer, instructor in tomato specialists such as Dr. Prit-. ' ~ a brigadier general, and is on duty as communications at Chanute Field, chard of the U. S. Department of.lj ',1 assistant to the Chief of EngineE'r8 at ll., and First Lieutenant Ephraim P. Agriculture, Dr. T. F. Manns of the -...,.i.!1 Republicans Haue Euer Stood For A Protediue Tarid nomic hand of the foreigner been given opportunity to con trol Our economic life and the standards of living. And, never has that been done by the Republican Party. "The wise men of a l! parties in the past have upheld the policy of u pro. tective tariff! For three ellr!.! li nd The following is an extract from ou'. yelll:s the genius. of th Re. the speech of the Hon. Willis C. public, With the exception of u few Hawley of Oregon, delivered in the scant an~ sorr~wfu l years under House of Representatives during this DemocratC conla 0 1,. has kept U' n ast June: fr~ e people economically. We pay p tribute to none.. "The colonies which became the United States resisted the attempted domination of their business enterprise. Resistance to such domination became a material factor in forming a sentiment which led to the war of 1776 and to independence. Since that great day, the foot of the hostile invader has come in only to go out in haste. "n pursuance of our policy to be free from foreign control in every respect, the first general law adopted under the Constitution was a tariff act for the protection of our industrious people.. f we resist political invasion, why not economic invasion? "Washington's advice of continuing wisdom and permanent vulue CO Ull. seling 'entangling alliances wilh non but fl'iendship to all' is as importa nt to economic as to political enlangle. ments. When in the convocation of the world older states and nations boasting of their long str u g' gl~s to attain their economic independence and to establi.sh their own national standards of living, shall ra is their voices and say 'With a great price bought we this freedom,' America shall lift her head with the yet ~rouder answer, 'But, was free. born'." Both are equally harmful to the Counted Out.-Little Hans tame liberties of our people. home. with two black eyes and a bat. "Protection has been the policy of tered face. "Fighting again," said statesmen, whose great names and ij- his mother. "Didn't tell you ihnt lustrious services to the Union adorn when you were angry you should the pages of our history as the stars count to a hundred before you do anythe glittering firmament. But few thing?" "Yes, mother, but t he other t times, and those to the sorrow and boy's mother had told hi m only to L' disaster of our people, has the eco- coun t up to fifty."-der Gats. 1 Tired, Aching Feet kl relieved with Dr. SchoU',, ro':t - ~azer. Re.tore. weak and Bunions broken down an:h... $3.50 per Pair. Coms ~ n. SchoU', Zinc>-pede.. top pain at once. Re-- move cau8e, friction and, jpreaure. Quick. safe. /,!:._ oure rcllef. 35< per bol Special-Free Foot Comfort 'DEMONSTRATON August 27th and 28th Foot troubles are universal. Government records show that 1 out of every 10 adult people have some form of foot trouble. You are probably foot-miserable yourself. t may be only a com, a callous, a bunion or some more serious trouble, such as weak and broken-down arches. You might not know the nature of your trouble but you do know that your feet ache, pain, and get all tired out on the sli&htest provocation. Foot Expert from New York Coming This man is from the personal staff of Dr. W m. M. Scholl, the recognized foot authority, and demonstrates Dr. Scholl's Method of Foot Correction. Come in, on the above date, and meet him. t's well worth your time. There's no charge for this valuable service. Free Pedo.. graph Prints of Your Feet n a few seconds' time, without removing the hose, he will make, without charge, a perfect print of your foot that positively hows if you do have foot troubletl and to what stage the trouble has progressed. Free Samples Come in and get a free sample of Dr. Scholl's Zino-pads for corns. They remove the cau~friction and presaure. natant, tale, sure relief..put one on-the pain u gone. M. PLNCK NEWARK'S EXCLUSVE SHOE STORE E, MAN ST. ~~~~nq~~~~ooh~ci~~~"~~ry~~~~ci~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~m~rn~rn~rn~rn~w~~~w~m~m~w~m~~~m~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~_ graduated from the Army Wa' Col- Panama. Station, Mr. H. F. Hall of the Camp- ::: lege in 1917., The Blue Hen's contribution to the bell Soup Company, Dr. T. B. Symons ~~lli~~&h~hl~~~~ci~~~~~~~ci~~~~~ci~ry~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~w~~~~~=~=~w~~~~~=~=w====~~~ next in rank, graduated from the Qf which it may well be proud. Mr. A. D. Radebaugh, formerly of the military academy in 1894 as an addi- Wherever the Stars and Stripes wave University of Delaware. tional second lieutenant of cavalry. over army posts and military reser- t is conceded by tomato growers ~Ueri::s t~:o~~t:~is~~afi;:~i!~e:te~aanr~ ~:t~::~d~~r~~sb~;d~e~~w:::d::ea:~ ~~~t:~l~n;~~a~~k;~e~~~~st~~f ~~v:: An Oun' ce' of Cure t Wt h Pt d ii P. ~l For a time he served in the commis- from ocean to ocean; in the jungles Delaware, that the annual meeting of sary and inspector general's depart- of Panama, where the soldi ers in tomato growers for a field meeting is ~ ments, nd was a colonel of infantry khaki labored so energeticall y to having a beneficial effect on the 1 during the World War. He now eom- make the great canal a possibility; in tomato canning industry. The grow- S t,\!; mands the 3rd Cavalry, the "show" the ice-bound reaches of Alaska; un- ers are able to inspect the improved or a ' oun :j cavalry regiment of the Army, at del' the tropical skies of Hawaii; and varieties best adapted for canning :! Fort Myer, Va. Colonel Hawkins is a in the once fever-stricken Philippines. purposes, observe modern methods of Of graduate of the Army Staff College, a Even in the Orient, where Old Glory culture under field conditions, and to reventlon distinguished graduate of the School flutters j).:-oudly beside the vari- exchange ideas with other growers ' of the Line, and a graduate of the colored standards of the Chinese Re- from different sections of the two il Cavalry School. public, the Blue Hen's Chickens are states. Last year's meeting was at- " One of the most prominent of the loyally protecting the interests of tended by over 500 toma.to growers, :l Blue Hen's Chickens in the Regular America. and it is expected that there will be Keep it well stocked ---After the accident has happened. " Army is Lieutenant Colonel Alex- even a larger attendance t his year. :' ander H. Davidson. Colonel Davidson N MEMORAM,1 served in practically every enlisted n memory of our beloved son and Auto Races Called Off t is impossible to prevent all accidents; consequently, every home should :: grade in Troop E, 4th Cavalry, from D T M dd T k :j brother, Charles A. Davis, who passed ue 0 u y rae have a well-stocked first aid cabinet. When you need something from your: '!' M arch, 18~O, to Jly, 1899, w h en he away August 17, 1923 : ' was appointed a first lieutenant in the The automobile races scheduled to first aid cabinet, you need it at once. Therein lies the importance of keep- 36th U. S. nfantry. For a short time W ' t.. f th h ' h h' " after he was mustered out at the e S en m vam or e urrymg be eld on t e dll't track at Elsmere ing it always well stocked. il' close of the Spanish-American War ~r!s.and the sound of a voice we on last Saturday were postponed on We long for the touch of a vanished account of the wet and dangerous Th b f d d bl d he served as private, sergeant and hand d h 's smile full f ch ' condition of the track, to this coming ere are anum er 0 epen a e.rugs which we would be pleased to ~ : ' first sergeant of Troop K, 13th Cav- and b~as~.. a eel' Saturday, August 28. After a me- recommend to you for your first aid cabinet. Let us cooperate with you in airy. n Febraury, 1901, he was com- We long or his ripphng laugh and chanic, driving a Stutz roadster, missioned a first lieutenant of cavalry. tri~h/~~d h~~y.songs that were s kidded and nearly turned over while keeping that cabinet well stocked; we will be glad to aid you in choosing a ii During the World War Colonel We long and we grieve, and we can't trying out the track, the National complete and correct assortment, if you will stop in? D.RUG 'STORE " Davidson was decorated with the Dis- believe that Charles has passed Motor Racing officials immediately t! tinguished Service Cross "for extra- away. considered it the wiser course to call,! ordinary heroism against an armed Sadly missed by Mother and Sister, off the races that day. The same pro- ' j enemy." n 1923 he graduated from Lavinia D. Burns. gram scheduled for last Saturday will RHODES' the advanced course of the Cavalry - be held on the 28th. : School at Fort Riley, Kansas. He is The trouble with the franc is that _ i now stationed with the 104th Reserve it goes down every time the French About all the average Europe:m na-! Division at Salt Lake City, Utah. try to buy real money with it.-dallas tion now likes about A~erica is Santa ~j Lieutenant Colonel John M. Dunn News. Claus.- New Bedford Times. ~ ~~iti ~~=~~"i~. =~~ ~~!i!ic"i!=~!i~~~=!~!!i!i!i!i!i~i!;~i~~'~;~.', ~, ','... ~ Wednesday, Au Green man uri methods used to the productivity Romans used leg sown in Scptembe in May fo ' the ing crop. Lettuce pl'c)du,~ ti~. important Shipments

7 to \\'t c!n sc1ay, Augu t 25, 1926 THE NEW A RK POST, NEW ARK, DELAWARE. 7 PLACE YOUR AD HERE-GET RESULTS CLASSFED ADS PAY BG! Classified Advertising r THE COMMUNTY MARKET PLACE ADVEilTSEME T FOR BDS F ARM, HOME, ealed propos-a)- s -w-ill be l'eceived by the State Highway Depal'tment, at its a nd GARDEN office, Dover, Delaware, until 2 o'clock '1b========='====='11 1 P. M., S ptember, HJ26, and at that place and time publicly opened for Do As the Romans Did contracts involving the following ap- Gp 'cn manuring is one of the oldest proximate quan_ti_ti_e_s'_' sertion; 30 cents subsequent inser- Apply ml'thods used to maintain or increase Contract 69 4.S6 Miles tions. F RA K GARATWA, TOWN COUNCL 1 TOWN LBRARY f1afublc SALES: 50 cents per inch -25-3t 105 N. College Ave. MErb:n D~l<,:a~:~~nt of Council-- The Library will be opened : the productivity of the soil. The Section "A" Rom an. used leg umes, which were Ha rr i n g to n-m ast~ns Corner 2.46 Miles own in September and turned under 1 Big AS h_wa~r:c~:o~c~:~1 DRECTORY RATES: FOR RENT! Want, For Sale, For Rent, Lost and i ~hii~lr: ~~gt ~~~rt;!r~c~':r~~~:: F~:1\~;i;n~:S, e~en;:.:: ::~c~o~ v~n:!~ 1 1i!!!:l!!!!l-2!;2!;-;;;i-~-;;;i--=-=-=-;;;-;;;;:-;;;-;;;i-=-~=-~--;;;-2!;~~-=-=-~;;;;-:;;;;;:;~~--==~-;;;;;;;;~-=-~;;;;;;!;;:11 All advllrtis in~py for this page FOR RENT-7-room brick dwelling, ORGANZATON ~::s~::. : : :~:: :::: 2.40 Miles in \lay fo ' the benefit of t he follow- 1 v... Acres Clearing should be in this office before 4 P. M. with bath, heat. East Main St., E astern District-A. L. Beals, J. L. Frl'day 3 to 6.'45 p. L ing l rop. 11;.1 Acres Grubbing Tuesday 'pr e c edi ~g day of publicatio!l ' j ewark. Rent, $30 per month. Grier Cu. Yds. Excavation Advertismg received!,ednesday Wll ewark Trust and Safe Deposit Co. Central Distl j<'t-r. G. Buckingham, Saturday 9 to 12 m. 7 to 9 :00 p. m. ;Hany Juices Make Vinegar 800 u. Yds. Borrow not be &,uaranteed poston.,4,4t. Real Estate Dept. Howard Patchell. 0 ' Tons Broken Slag Base Course Western District-E. C. Wilson, o. Jf: n~' fr Ui t JUices are well SU ted to for secondary road ~. FRE ALARMS FOR SALE FOR RENT-lor 2 bed-rooms, living W. Widdoes. vineg ' making, as t hey contain 1280 Lin. Ft. 15 in. Co rrugated Metal -- room, dining-room and kitchen, Attorne:v-Charles B. Evans. ca~ln ca~e of_ fi re,_ da y _ or ~ight 329 SU(, r in the proper proportion and P!pe. other necessary. or desirable sub- 68 ~i~~ Ft. 18 m. Corrugated Metal FOR SALE-Rye. 84,1t CALL 21 W SeC?'etary and Treaaltrer and Collector Bu order' F 're Chl'elf E 'son. J. L. HOLLOWAY, ".. of TlUles-Mrs. Laura Hossinger. J tal1(:('o. The Umted States Depart- 72 Lin. Ft. 24 in. Corrugated Metal 8,25,2t Phone 181-J 4. FOR RENT-Apartment for rent, Alderman-Daniel Thompson. mcnt of Agriculture has published a P!pe. th l'ee rooms and private bath. Superintendent 01 Streets-C. R. E. RALROAD SCHEDULES bulletin on making vinegar at home. 38 ~i~~ Ft. 30 ll. Corrugated Metal FOR SALE-Thoroughbred beagle MRS. FRED E. STRCKLAND, Lewis. pups,2 months old; pedigree papers 5-26-tf Park Place. Healthy Hens SUfa~bt~~~t of Water and Light- Note-All time. are Standard. ~ 70 ~l~~ Ft. 36 in. Corrugated Metal go with them. FOR RENT - Small-sized House. Police-Arthur Barnes. BALTMORE" OHO n di oinfecting poultry houses or 44 Lin. F t. 48 in. Corrugated Metal CLYDE ROBNSON, \ OJll'Cb where thel'e has been a n out- Pipe Apply BuikUn{1 mpector-rodman Lovett. DALY Prospect ANe. Mille nspector-h. R. Baker. break of avian tuberculosis it is important that t he liquids be sprayed or Elkton Road-Pleasant Valley School Assessor-Robert Motherall. Contract 70 Newark. 1_3_,l_0_,t_f._L_._HA N_D_L_O_F_F_._ Plumbing mpactor-rodman Lovett. West East FOR RENT-Five-room house. Apply S treet Committee-R. G. Buckingham, O. W. Widdoes, J. L. Grier, 4:48 a.lll. 6:20 a. m. oth erwise applied in a t horough manntt'o so that the area to be treated?~~~ g~: i ~ ~: :~~~t~~~tion Phone 196 J H: W. COOK, Howard Patchell. 8:54 a.lll. 9:52 a. m Miles FOR SALE-Fine Bartlett Pears. 3,3.tf A. E. CANN. 7:50 a. ll. 9:23 a. ll. llay be well soaked. After disinfection, the premises should be kept free for. econdary roads $3.00 and $5.00 a month Tons Broken Slag Base Course 8,25,3t Paper Mill Road. FOR RENT-Private Garages, $3.00 [,;ght and Water Committe_E. C. 10:52 a. ll. 11:29 a. ll, Wilson, Howard Patchell, R. G, 2:03 p. m. 3:34 p. ll. Buckingham. 3:02 p. ll. 5:08 p. m. of fowls for several months. f conveni pnt it is advisable to place new 264 Lin. Ft. 1'5 in. Corrugated Metal BULDNG LOTS for sale on Dela- a,30,t! E. C. WLSON. Collecto.r of Gc.rbage-- William H. 4:00 p. m. 6:09 p. ll. Pipe Harrmgton. 5:54 p. m. 7:11 p. m. 32 Lin. Ft. 30 in. Corrugated Metal ware avenlle, opposite Wolf Hall. 1 PARRSH will fit you with the 9:40 p.lll. 7:28 p.m. tock on gl'ound which has not been Pipe. Apply fin est spectacles or eye glasses.-adv. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 9:36 p. m. occupied by poultry for a year or 32 Lin. Ft. 36 in. Corrugated Metal 7,14 L. HANDLOFF. mure. Pipe HGHEST price paid for live stock. P?'osident-John K. Johnston. 8 M. Ft. B. M. Creosoted Timber n restocking, it is highly important for Bridges FOlt SALE-Sand, delivered. General Call or write ' l', ce-p esident-r. W. Heim. to obtain fowls, or eggs for hatching, hauling by truck. 1. PLATT, Secl'eta?'y-Warren A. Singles. from flocks which have shown no evid once of the presence of an inf ctiou disease for at least a year. Some Salad Lettuce productipn has become an important industry in r ecent years. Shipments in 1924 filled more than six times as many cars as in After Death Carcasses of diseased fowls should never be t hrown where chickens or hogs can get at them, as there is much greater danger of severe infection from eating tuberculous or otherwise diseased organs of a dead fowl that from other sources. Cabbage Progress of the commercial cabbage industry has been marked for 'a dbcade by the growth of newer shipping sections rather t han by total increases. Product ion has extended we tward where climate is favorable and markets are l'elatively good, and it has gained in the South in response to increasing demand and better shipping facilities for out-of-season vegetables. KOTTCE- TO Trespassing or Gunning on my farm. H. W. COOK, Paper Mill Road. PUBLC SALE OF REAL ESTATE Sou th College A venue, Newark, Delaware ' Saturday, August 28th AT O~E O'CLOCK, Standard Time. Real E state consists of 7-room britk ho use, steam heat, all city conren icnres, cemeted cellar. Lot is 50 ft. by 680 ft. Garage for 2 Cars Th i, property is located in a very de ~ il"abl e res idential section. Th is property must a nd will be sold for th~ high dollar. Come, buy and li ve where educational facilities predominate. A rm ~ rong, Auct, C. J. BURNLEY. Legal Notice Estate of Frances O. Elliott, deceased. Notice is he reby given that Letters of Contract 71 Concrete Wide4~~~g~1~~:swold-Smyrna 6,30,tf. NORMAN SLACK, Phone 197 R Cu. Yds. Excavation Cu. Yds. Cement Concrete Pave- FOR SALE-Lot on Amstel Avenue; ment 50x240 ft. Apply 1600 r~il~t Ft. Asphaltic Expansion J. V. PRCE, 450 Sq. Yds, Class "A" Concrete 5, Delaware Ave. Gutter Phone 289 Newark, Dc!. T? ectsul O? -D. A. McClintock. 1 Di? eoto? s-j. Earl Dougherty, J ohn R. Fulton, George W. Rhodes, WANTED Franklin Collins, J. K. Johnston, Henry F. Mote, Myel' Pilnick, J. W ANTED-A r eliable married man Newt~n Sheaffer, R. W. Heim, D. A. fo r farm work. House and privi- D:'{W!W!~c~Ul111::~~en A. Singles, W. D. HALLER, White Hall Farm, BOARD OF HEALTH m.;~:~~l~hi~cete~; (fgrd~~ss~f~el?oe~= :.~,~ SALE-Chestnut :.o~~c~~~ 8 _~~~te No.2 E lkton, Md. ~;~!1!~~r ~a~~nsdmrh~es. ~~~:~~n a~fs ;~c~ fi~d~tract and be com- -F-O-R-S-A-L-E-_ -_ -_ -_ -S-tr-ic-t-y--fr-e-sh-- e-g-g-s. ljf;;:;--~--;;:;-~--=-=--=-~--~-;;:;--~--=-~--=-~--=-~--=-;;:;--~-;;:;--~--;;:;-~--~,,11i Orlando Strahorn, Robert Jones, Mo nthly payments will be made for ~~el'e;{ ecaecnht ~o;fh. construction com- J AMES KELLY, 28 1;2 Academy St., Bidders must submit proposals 5,12 Newark. upon forms provided by the Depar.t ment.. PARTES Each proposal must be accompanied Having purchased a new 30-ft. by a surety bond, certified check, or money to t he amount of at least ten cruiser, am prepared to take parties (10) per centum of the total amount from North East on outings, or to of the proposal. Better ton, Md. Phone 238 J. The envelope containing the proposal must be marked "Proposal for Newark, Del. J. E. MORRSON the construction of State Highway Contract No " The Contract will be awarded or rejected within twenty (20) days from t he date of opening proposals. The r ight is reserved to reject any REAL ESTATE or all bids. FOR SALE Detailed plans may be seen and index plans and. pecifications may be New dwelling, opposite Country obtained upon r eceipt of two dollars Club, fin ely finished throughout, 9 ($2.00) which amount will not be refunded. room, laundry, hot water heat, open rooms including tile bath, breakfast STATE HGHWAY DEPARTMENT fire place. Pl'ice below actual cost 8,18,2t Dover, Delaware. LEGAL NOTCE Estate of Harriet W. Towonsend, Deceased. otice is hereby given t hat Letters Testamentary upon the Estate of Harriet W. Townsend late of Mill Creek Hundred, deceased, were dul y granted unto Newark Trust & Safe Deposit Company on the twentyfourth day of June, A. D. 1926, and all persons indebted to t he said deoeased are requested to make payment to the Executor without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhi bit and present t he same duly probated to t he said Executor on or before t he twenty-fourth day of June, A. D. 1927, or abide by the law in this behalf. Addl'ess -Newark Trust & Safe Deposit Company, Executor. 6,30,10t. Newark, Delaware. PARRSH will fit you with the finest spectacles or eye glasses.-adv. FOR FLOWERS Phone Wilmington 203 BRNTON'S 203 West Ninth Street and a r eal bargain. East s ide, double brick on Cleveland ave., hot water heat, bath, etc.; first offer $3000. Get this property, THE TME TO BUY S WHEN THE OWNER WSHES TO SELL. REAL ESTATE DEPT. NEWARK TRUST AND SAFE DEPOST CO. (REAL ESTATE DEPT.) Admi nistration Cum Testamento An- 9:.1==================="=======::; nexo UPO the estate of Frances O. Elliott, late of White Clay Creek Hundred, deceased, were duly granted unto Delaware Trust Company, on tha twenty-fourth day of June, A. D. 1926, and all persons ind 13 bted to the said d ceased are requested to make payments 0 the administrator C. T. A. without delay, and all per sons having demands against the deceased are requir d to exhibit and present the same duly probatod to the said administrator C. T. A. on 11' before the twentyfourth day of J rne, 0 A. D. 1927, or abide by the law 'n s behalf. ~~~ l~_ 9th ~ket Streets Wilmin pn. Del. S,25.8 Ad mi ni!trl C. T. A. QUALTY HOMES Situated in residential sections of Newark are now complete, and ready for occupancy. Arrange tor inspection.... NQURES AT ETHER TRUST COMPANY JAMES H. HUTCHSON USED CARS AT COST Ford Touring; Balloon Tires Ford Tourings, with starters Star Tourings Star Coupe Star Touring. These cars were traded in on new Star Cars, They have been put in good running order and will be sold at cost. Terms to suit., ::,': RTTENHOUSE MOTORS :: STAR AG!:NTS NEWARK, DEL. ;... i BOARD OF EDUCA'rON The Board meets the second Monday in each month at 8 P. M. Pr ident-.tohn S. Shaw. Vice-President-Harrison Gray. Secretary-J. H. Owens. R. S. Gallaher. MALS OUTGONG North ana East South (;om WeBt 7:45 a. m. 7:45 a. m. 10:00 a.m. 10:46 a.m. 11 :00 a. m. 6:00 p. m. 2:00 p. m. 6:00 p.m. 0 2:45 p.m. 6:46 p. m. NCOMNG 8 :00 a. m. 9:30 a.m. 12:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 8:00 a.m. 9:30 a. m. 12:30 p. m, 6:00 p. m. S UNDAY West 4:48 a. m. 8 :54 a, m. 10 :52 a. m. 2 :03 p. m. 3:03 p. m. 4:00 p. m, 6:40 p. m. 9:40 p.m. North. 5:17 a. m. 6:37 a. m. 7:37 a.lll. 8:31 a.lll. 9:20 a. m. 11:18 a. m, 2:43 p. m. 4:37 p.m. 5:55 p. m. 9:08 p. m. 1 :25 a. m. North. 8:31 a. m. 9:20 a.m. 11:46 a. ll. 2:43 p. m. 4:37 p.m. 5:55 p.m. 9:08 p. m. 1:25 a. m, P. B. &: W. DALY SUNDAY Ead 7:01 a.m. 9 :23 a. JL 9:52 a. m. 11:29 a. m. 3:34 p.lll. 6:08 p. m. 6:09 p. m. 7:11 p. m. 9:36 p. m. South. 8:03 a. m. 8:22 a. m. 10:30 a, ll. 10:50 a. m. 12:14 p. m. 3 :02 p. m. 4:51 p. m. 5:41 p. m. 6:45 p. m. 9:36 p. m. 11:26 p. m. 12:26 1).. m. South. 8:22 a. m. 9:24 a. m. 10:50 a. m. 12 :14 p, m. 5:41 p. ll. 6:35 p. m. 8:19 p. m. 9:36 p.m. 11:26 p. m. 12:26 a. m. WLSON LNE ~OOCH ' S BRDGE, DELAWARE N EWARK-DJ:LAWARE CTY BRANOH The Dr. Harter home on W. PHLADELPHA ncommg-9. a, m. and 6 p. m. Out- L N Main street, priced much below its going-7 :45 a. m. and 4 p. m. eave ewa.rk Arriv. N_" value. PENN'S GROVE, CHESTER 8:33 a. m. Schedule in EO'ect Saturday, May 22, STRCKERSVLLl 8:28a.m. AND KEMBLEBVLL 12 :16 p, m. 11:08 a. m. The Burnley home on Depot Daily ncluding J~;3ays and Holidays Rcoming-4 p. m. Outgoing-6 :30 p. m. 5:55 p :12 p. m. Road, brick, 8 rooms and bath, double garage. Owner compelled Daylight-Saving Time AVONDALE, LANDENBF..RG AND to live near his work and has n- Subject to Change Without Notice CHATHAM BUS SCHEDULES structed us to sell. Make offer! Leave Wilmington, Foul'th Street ncoming-12 and 6:30 p. m. Out- Wharf, >l!8.00, *10.30 a. m., a1.30, going-6 :46 a. J' and] :46 p. m. NEWARK - DOVER The Beale Home, 263 E. Main *3.00, 4.15, *7.00, b8.30 and.*9.30 p. m. (Standard Time) street, in excellent condition, priced Leave Philadelphia, Chestnut Street very low. Wharf, *7.30, *!l.oo, *11.00 a. m., BANKS DALY. -- The Crompton Dwelling, Acad C1.:~t:~~1~t*~ 2~~,~ 08r~~~. *9.30 p. m. FARMERS TRUST COMP/.NY N 8wark to Dov~r Dovn' to N work emy street, opposite High Schoo l, a Stops at Penn's Grove Sats" Suns. Meeting of Directors every Tuesday 7:16 a. m. 12:00 m. 6 rooms and bath. Wel worth th,!. and Holidays only, mominjil' at nine o'clock. 12 :30 p. m. 4:00 p. m. money asked. b Stops at P enn's Grove on Sundays and Holidays onl y. NEWARK TRUST AND SAFE A suburban home at E lliott c Stops at Penn's Grove on Saturdays only. DEPOST COMPANY SUN AT Heights complete in every detail, rd!n~~'i~:' land. Listed at a very Meeting of Dir~ctors every Wednesday evening at eight o'clock. 12 :30 p. m..:00 p.m. 8:20 a. m. 12:00 m. WLMNGTON PENN'S GROVE FERRY New Dwelling, South Chapel WEEK DAYS BULDNG AND LOAN WLMNGTON-NEWARK street extended, 6 rooms and bath, Leave Wilmington- 7.00, 8.00 and 4 garages. You cannot duplicate 8.50 A. M. from Fourth Street Wharf. ASSOCATONS BUS LNE t his property for t he price asked. Then every 20 minutes, up to and NEWARK' including 8.00 P. M., from Marine Terminal. SecretMJ-Warren A. SinJil'les. 9.00, 10.00, 11.00, P. M. and Meetmg-First Tuesday nijil'ht of each A. M., from Fourth St. Wharf. month. Leave Penn's Grove 6.00, 8.00 and 8.50 A. M. Then every 20 minutes up MUTUAL to and including 8.10 P. M" 9.00, Meeting- Second Tuesday of each 10.00, 11.00, P. M. and month at 7:30 p. m. A. M. fiecretaf'1/-j. Earle DOUJil'herty. Sundays and Holidays-Leave both Marine Terminal and Penn's Grove every 20 minutes from 6.00 A. M. STATED MEETNGS until A. M. Mondall-2d and.th, every month, Car and driver, 50c. A. F. and A. M. WLMNGTON.RVERVEW Monooll-Jr. Order American M. BEACH M=cs.:!:~~~::. LodJre No.6, Thursday, Friday and Saturday KniJrhta of Pythia., 7.80 p. m., Leave Wilmington, 9.15, a. m., standard time. Fratarnal Ball and 6.15 p. m. TueBdat-l. O. R. M., 7 :30 p. m. Leave Riverview Beaeh, a. m., Tuelooll-Aneient Order of Hibem noon, 4,16 and 6.30 p. m. ians, or A. O. H., Divaion No.8, Sundays and HolldaY8 2d every month, 8 p. m. Leave Wilmington, 9.15, Weane,ooll-HeptasophB, of S. W. M., 1.4t:~!5R~:~v~~ ~!:c~: 13:15 a. m., 7 :30 p. m noon, 2.30, 4.00, 5.30 a'nd 7.30 W:::::~Wht:: c,~: J:m;; Ne:~ p. m. Woodmen of the World. CAJSETRLSEE'yDEL. NEW FERRY Wednesooll-Mineola Council No. 17, Degree of Pocohontas, 8 p. m. WEEK DAYS Wednuoolf - Board ot Directors, Leave New Castie, Delaware, foot Chamber of Commeree, every 4th, Kf. C~~S:::~oS;;~~~~8 ~~~ir~1l~:'; T~,,:~a':v-. O. O. F. 7:!l0 p. m. 9.00, 10.00, and P. M. Thursaall-lst and Brd of each Leave Pennsville, N. J., foot of month, Newark Chapter No. 10, Main St., 6.30, 7.30 and 8.00 A. M. O. E. S. Every 20 minutes until 8.00 P. M; F~-Modem Woodmen of Arner- 8.30, 9.30, 10.30, P. M" an iea, No iu 7:80 P.,. N.. T 12.3~U'N~AYS AND HOLDAYS F~t;::~=:",P8 l).~ minutes service from 6.00 A. M. SGt"~-Knl~hta of Golden Eac\e, L_ :' until midnll(ht. 7,21,tf 8 p. m. Leave P. R. R. Station Wilmington: 5.00, 6.00, 7.00, 8.00, 9.10, 10.10, A. M , 1.10, 2.10, 3.10, 4.10, 4.40, 5.10, 6,10, 7,10, 8.10, 9.10, P. M. Leave Deer Park Hotel, Newark: 6.00, 7.00, 8.00, 9,15, 10.15, A, M.; 12.15, 1.16, 2.16, 3.15, 4.15, 5.15, 5.35, 6.15, '1.15, 8.15, 9.15, 10.15, P. M.; Midnight. LEGAL NOTCE Estate of John J. Lyneh, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Letters of Administration upon the Estate of John J. Lynch, late of Pencader Hundred, deceased, were duly granted unto Harry L. Dayett, on the sevent eenth day of June, A. D. 1926, and all persons indebted to the said deceased are requested to make payments to the Administrator without delay, and all persons having demands against the deceased are required to exhibit and present the same duly probated to the said Administrator on or before the seventeenth day of June, A. D. 1927, or abide by the law in this behalf. Address Charles B. Evans, Att'y at Law, Ford Building, Wilmington, Delaware. 6,23,10t. HARRY L. DAYETT, Administrator.

8 8 THE NEWARK POST, NEWARK, DELAWARE, Wednesday, Augu t 25, 1926 Prospects Good For N ew P aint Shop Local Poultry Exhibited Wesley Collegiate A n mprovement (Continued from Pa&"e 1.) Prospects for the coming school Newark's new paint shop and wallyear, at Wesley Collegiate nstitute, paper store will be completed and according to an unofficial report from equipped by the first of ne'xt month. the new president bf the institution,. N. Sheaffer has greatly improved Professor Clarence A. Short, appear the uppeurunce of his shop on Muin unusually bright. Professor Short, street by the recent remodelling. The assisted by Pt'ofessors C. E. Davis shop has un attractive front of yellow and C. W. Hale, is conducting u vigor- bricks with a large plate gluss disous cumpuign to pre ent to the public play window. nside the woodwork, of Delaware, Maryland, und Virginiu except the floor which is painted u the udvantages of the Dover Pre- dull grey, is ull a pure white. parutory school. The lighting is so arranged that it The enrollment this fall promises to rese mbles daylight; by a system Gf be a large one. The scholastic year frosted electric bulbs and specially begins the second week in September. co l ~ l: e ~ glo.bes the u s ~a l. glare from Professor Short is a former resident artfical ltghts s eitmmateq. ~r. of Newurk and was ut one time a Sheu~er ~ame to Newark from Ph.llab f th U' 't f Dela delphia SX years ago and has rapdly :::: ~:a~h ing esta~,v~:~~: c~nnecte~ built up u prosperous business in thut with the Mathematics Department. t ime. FOUR DELAWARE WOMEN HONORED Four Delaware women, all of whom have gained State-wide recognition and some nation-wide recognition for t heir work in science, education, civics, and welfare have been selected by a committee, composed of Governor Robinson, Mrs. Donald S. Ashbrook of Wilmington, and Mrs. Harry W. Viven of Bridgeville, to be especially honored at the Sesqui-Centennial on Delaware Day, September 20. Miss Annie Jump Cannon, Mrs. A. D. Warner, Mrs. T. Coleman du Pont, and Miss Emily Perkins Bissell are the ones honored by the committee's selection. Miss Carin on is a nationally known astronomer and is the scientific representative. Mrs. Warner, who has been a great force in the rapid growth of the Women's College of the University of Delaware, was picked for her work in education. Mrs. du Pont, whose efforts on the behalf of Community Service and the Yo ung Women's Christian Association, is the third member of the group. And Miss Bissell won the honor through her outstanding welfare work. CHURCHES The Methodist Episcopal Church The Cent ral Church-Rev. Frank Herson, i\1 inister 10 a. m., Session of the Church School. 11 a. m., Morning worship and sermon. ubject, " The Transfigured D antz L~aves (Continued from Palre 1.) Dantz, editor of the Vineland, New Jersey, Republican. The elder Mr. Dantz was a very close friend of former President Roosevelt--the two having ranched together in the West years before "T. R.'" entered into 1 cockerel, and 3 pullets a nd 1 politics. From this friendship t he cockerel. The fourth prize is twenty younger Dantz gained his name. dollars in mo ney. n all $125 will be "Ted," as he is affectionately known given as cash prizes besides t he high to the community, will be succeeded class breeding stock. These awards by W. Earle Jacobs, of Aberdeen, a re f urnished by the railroad as a r e Maryland. Mr. Jacobs, who was for ward for the club membeh winning four yea rs co-editor of t he Aberdeen them. Enterprise and for two years editor of the Aberdeen E nterprise ang Harford Mr. Willim has ten cl ub members in the Baltimore and Ohio poultry Democrat combined, has also club this year. They Jive around been on the staff of one of the big New Castle lnd Hares Corner com_ Baltimore dailies. He will take up his munities. t will be from this club work as Business Manager of The Newark Post on September 3. CHURC H FESTVAL The peach festival which was to have been held on the lawn of Bethel M. E. Church, Bet hel, Md., on Tuesday evening, August 24th, wi ll be hel d this Friday night. n case of storm the -festi val will be held in side the church. Proceeds will go to the men ted Mr. Wmim, "when it was made known that the Baltimore show was to be discontinued. But the railroad endeavored to keep their promise with the individual club me!'llbel's and del:med it necessary that t hey hold a creditable Poultry Show somewhere for their' 1926 Poultry Club members." t is planned that t he exhibit of the B. & O. Poultry Clubs at the Sesqui-Centennial show will consist of approximately 32 pens from four states, l1linois, Maryland, West Virginia, and Delaware. Three entries of five birds each will be made from t hree Maryland counties,_ making a total of nine pens f rom that state. Since New Castle County is the only one in this state that the railroad traverses, t he club inembers of t his county will exhibit,three entries of five birds each. Fifteen prizes will be competed for in t his exhibit by the Baltimore and Ohio members. The fil'st three prizes con&ist of high class breeding pens of 5 pullets and 1 cockerel, 4 pullets and that the three exhibitions will be selected. t is his plan to have Mr. H. S. Palmer, Extension Poultryman, visit with him all of these members and select the birds that will go to the Sesqui-Centennial Show. "We arc the closest ones to Philadelphia," said Mr. Willim, "and our entries from New Castle county should arrive there in better condition 13th Series Mutual Building and loan ~ssociation Of Newark No Meddling grade stock of White Rocks we distr ibuted to the B. and O. Club members this spring," continued t he club Young, and Mrs. Schultz, of Pocoho'ntas Council No. 1. n order to give the orphans in (Continued f rom Page 1.) agent, "the club members of this charge of the orde,' an outing the the welfare, of the Republican p' rty. county should not fear competition State Orphans Board will take a ll the The Republican party controlling thi from any state." orphans under t heir care to Newark county and State r eprescnls a sac r d to spend the day. trust confided by the peopl. 'i'h is Refreshments or a full meal may sacred trust, coming down from the be purchased on the grounds from day of the founding of the party a (Continued from Page 1.) Mineola Council, 01' those attending the expression of a high moral idea, for presentatioll to t he Democratic may take their lunch with them. shou ld not be abused, ncglecled or ( State Convention which meets t he Harv,ey J. Davis, great sachem, is forgotten. ' following day. There are expected 210 urging all members to show their in- "What may be called the lluchindelegates to the convention, 90 of terest in the affairs of the Home by a ry of the R publican part.y ill lhi which will be from New Castle large attendance on that day. county comprises a. First District county and 60 from each of Sussex _ Committee representing Wil mington, and Kent counties. M' W d T H d a Second District Comm itt.ee repre_ A candidate for the Levy Court on SS 00 S 0 ea senting rural New Castle,'unly, the Democratic ticket from Pencader Delaware Campers staunch and firm in its RepUblican. Hundred is Benjami n J ohnson. - - ism, and an Executive Committee rep. (Continued from Page 1.) resenting New Castle Coun ty a a nterest Picks Up :! Todd, Viola; Mrs. Mary E. Crane, whqle. Although registration return sf ~p- Harrington; Mrs. Lola S. Dill, ' Fel- "The d,uties of each body or com. pear to show.a general lack 0 lj1- ton; Mrs. Benjamin Hughes, H arring- mittee are clearly defined. There terest on the part of the voters of ton ; Mrs. William J. Brumley, should be no overlapping. 'l' here both parties, a keen interest on the Georgetown; MissLouise Cubbage, should be no officiou s meddling by one part of the citizens is being more and Milford; Miss Eleanor Mick, Milford; body with the affairs t hat belong more manifest each day as the prim- Mrs. Austin Peet, Milford; Mrs. J a- strictly to another body. Consid 1'- aries approach.. cob S. Smith, Georgetown; 'Mrs. ing the county as a whole the various P hi lip C. Elliott, Seaford; Mrs. bodies should cooperate f or mutual Red Men To Frolic Vaughn S. Evans, Laurel ; Mrs. M. A. benefit and for safeguarding peace Webb, Greenwood; Mr s. Annie E. and harmony with ears bent to hear (Continued from Page 1.) Watkins, Milford;. Mrs. Ed. T. the will of the voters. b Vaughn, Harbeson; Mrs. C. H. Nut-,.. Bag race,. O. R. M. utton. tel', Milford; Mrs. J. Romaine Elliott, ' ThS ll1ut~al respect fo r. the n ght 50-yard dash for fat men, box Oak Grove (Sussex Co.); Miss Elsie of each. body S the onl~ 10~ lca l Cou r e. cigars. M. Gray, Bridgeville, Mrs. White,. 1f~ for lstance, the '~t1mlll gto ~ C.om- 50-yard dash for fat women, box Viola; Mrs. A. H. Vincent, Christi- nllt.tee, or any cotene of W l l ml~g. candy. ana; and Mrs. Miller, Christiana. toman:,. should medd l ~ or me s With Potato race, men,. O. R. M. Miss Woods has had a great deal th~ affars of rural New Castle and button. of experience in camp work, having things should go.wrong, the ru ral Potato race, women, silk vest. been director of Red Wing Camp for ew Castle Committee would natur Potato race, boys, necktie. girls in Pennsylvania for six years. ally be censured when that committee Potato race, girls, box stockings. would be wholly innocent. And c o ~. Broad jump, auto strap. _ , trary if the rural New Castl" Com. Combination race, prize for both. mittee interfered with the affai r of B b C h k Wilmington. a y e S "Each body is supposed to knolv Pie eating contest. Balloon blowing contest. Relay race. best, and does know, we believe, the A number of local merchants are affairs and situation under its olvn among t hose who donated the prizes -FOR- jurisdiction. Hence mutual consider. for t he winners of the.above events. Fall Broilers ations and under standing and lhe joy The list includes: William H. Fergu- of serving the hi storical Republican on, Newark Department Store, j>uis Winter Meat party of Delaware should prevent Handloff, Clarence Dean,. Marritz, any in terference or rough riding M. Parrish, Sol Wi lson, p'rofessor AND which might provoke di sunity and Koerber, and Mrs. Stella Ely, all of - Spring Layers harmf ul con sequences. Newark; Harper Webb, Newport; "We are about entering upon a very Clifford White, Alfred Craig, Ebner Hatches ElJery Week important campaign. New Ca tie Brothers, Arthur Huebner, Mattahoon County Republicans should be true Tribe, Harris Brothers, Edward to itself, considerate, forebearing, Marvel Poultry Farms NOTCE-No trespassing on my property with g un or dog, under Georgetown. Delaware penalty of law. J. O. KOELG. Phone 46 R -12 8,25,3t. Newark, Del. harmonious and triumphant on elec tion day. That is our goal. Woe be tide any individual, or group of individuals, who might be tempted to obstruct this onward march." service. Clarence Woolery, of Wilmington and well -known to many Newark r esidents, has accepted a singing role in a new musical show, "Nightingale," soon to be presented by the Shuberts. The new show will open in.a:tlantic City about the middle of September for a short run prior to opening in New York City. Woolery has a splendid tenor voice. OPEN FOR SUBSCRPTON TO NEW SHARES DURNG AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER. APPLCATONS RECEVED AT THE Farmers T r ust Company J, E, DOUGHERTY, Secretary FORTY EGHT PER CENT Shoes for School Mother appreciates good school shoes for the children. She wants shoes for the boy and girl that will wear, even under the hardest sort of conditions. But at the same time she wants shoes that look w ell. There is not a better shoe on the market for wear, appearance anq comfort than the Star Brand Shoe. '. Remember, too, that we purchased this Fall's lot of shoes ahead of time, that we paid cash for them so we would be able to give you a good reliable shoe at a low price. Star Brand Shoes Are All leather Boys' Oxfords Original Price $4.00. Misses' Oxfords, Black Patent Leather and Brown Calf Leather Varue $3.50 at $2.95 Misses' Patent Leather Pumps... Are you one of the 48 per cent of people who buy their anthracite supply during the summer? Or are you one of those short-sighted persons who leaves your coal bi n empty until the firsl cold snap arr ives? Are you one of t he 52 per cent who take chances, or do you plan ahead for your wi nter's supply? The only possible reason for not buying YOUr coal now for next winter is that you are planning to shut up your house and go to F lorida or Europe. Are you? f not, join the sensible 48 per cent who are thinking and planning. ahead. Buy your coal now while it is readily obtainable, while it is easier to put into your cellar. Don't wait until snow and slu h frighten you into action. Don't let weather conditions be your rna lel'. Turn t he tables this year and rna tel' the weather. Place your order now and defy time and tide. The odds are all on your id e. You have nothing to lose, and all the comfort and peace of mind in the world to gain. Act now! FOR OPENNG SCHOOL DAYS AT $2.95 All Sizes Boys' High Top Shoes Value $4.00 at $2.50. The quantity is limited. Be sure to be among the first to get them. Marritz Department Store Value $3.50 at $2.75 Little Gents' Oxfords Value $3.00 at $2.25 East Main Street Newark, Delaware Order Before Septemberl Wholesalers have already raised the price of hard coal. Retailers must follow shortly, Wise buyers will get their supply NOW, The price is bound to go up later! H. WARNER McNEAL COAL LUMBER MLLWORK SUP phone 182 les /

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