Galena=Signal Oil Co. FRANKLIN, PENN.

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2 THE PRISCO-MAN RAILROAD PAINTS FOR ALL PURPOSES C~ach and CI~ (Ietal) Sorfa~er "Helal" Canran Prcsencr "letal" Canvas Proof Paint "Melalaloel" Paint Bdding and Station Paints Freight Car Pain11 ST. LOUIS SURFACER & PAINT CO. ST. LOUIS >IAKEBS- NEW YORK PANTASOTE The National Standard for Car Curtains and Car Upholstery AGASOTE HEADLINING WATERPROOF HOMOGENOUS in its Composition; will not warp, blister or separate. SEND FOR SAMPLE THE PANTASOTE COMPANY 11 Broadway, New York. F i r I. 593 Monnduock Illdy. Cblengo. Ill. Ynu 1~'rnn~~iseo. Cnl. Galena=Signal Oil Co. FRANKLIN, PENN. SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF CELEBRATED GALENA LUBRICANTS Perfection Valve and Signal Oils AND Galena Railway Safety Oil FOR STEAM AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY USE EXCLUSIVELY Guaranteed Cost Expert Service Free S. A. MEGEATH - President /Con. P. Curran Printing Co. Printers, Designers, Engravers, Lithographers, Blank Book Makers PHONES Bell. Mala 5191 Klalocb, Central 991 EIGHTH AND WALNUT STREETS ST. LOUIS, MO. &lention us when writing to advertisers, it will help us both.

3 THE FRISCO-MAN I Breams of a better, bigger home I of more comforls. more luxuries1 Breams 'Dreams of more of those things that make life ruorlh liuing I 'Dreams of- But Whv Dream? \\'lry nor y c Slor~tgolnery Ward & Co.'s ntrw 1000-],age catalogue back oc your dreams and turn dreams Into realities? TVhy not harness every one of your hard cilrncd dollars and make them yield for you more vnlua in ttie future than in the past-and the11 your dreams n'ill come true. 'l'he conservation of the dollar la ttie vital issue in these days of hlgh cost 0C IiVing..Znd the.\lontgomerj' \Yard L Co.'a critaloyue is the great tcxt-book that will help more than any other book to solve that problem. It tells how to purchase your foods, Curnlture, elotlllng, farm implements, luxuries, everything for the home, farm or field at the lowest possible pricea. wlth all the useless ~nlddleman's ~rotlt left OU t. It haw a thousand pages. wlth a hundred thousand opportunities for saving. This great last-book Is free for tile aslc- Inp. 4\11 you need do is to write us a note today saying: "Send your new yaxe book without cost or obligation to me"-nnd It wlll come by return mall. Sou have llnd the dream oc better living, of getting more comfort for all the famlly than you have had in the past. \Vhy not let this dream come true? \Vhy not send fnr the book today?- Sow, wl~lle you think of It? MONTGOMERY WARD & GO. New Yorh Chicago Kansas City Forl Worth. Trxas Portlard. Orcgon SECURITY SECTIONAL ARCHES FOR LOCOMOTIVES 30 Church Street, NEW YORK I AMERICAN ARCH COMPANY,comi,.,,,, c,,ca, UNIFORMS UNIFORMS JAMES H. HIRSCH & CO. 223 W. Jackson Blvd. CHICAGO Xention us when writing to advertisers, it will help us both.

4 2 THE PRISCO-MAN The Hewitt Supply Gol C. M. HEWITT, President HEWITT BABBITT METALS Standard Metallic Packing Rings RUBBERGOODS 303 Railway Exchange - Chicago THE TEXAS COMPANY TEXACO FUEL OIL Conformlnp to aovrrament S~ccMaatlon# HIGH IN FUEL VALUE Etaclend - Economical Texaco Railroad Lubricants Cut down the wear end tear on rolling mtoek Illuminating Oils Signal Oils THE TEXAS COMPANY Manufacturers of all kinds of Petroleum Products WHEN VISITING KANSAS GlTl STOP AT BLOSSOM HOUSE OPPOSITE UNION DEPOT XUROPEAN PLAN ST. LOUIS FROG & SWITCH CO. MANUFACTURER FROGS, SWITCHES, CROSSINGS. SWITCH STANDS FOR STEAM AND ELECTRIC RAILROADS OLIVER ELECTRIC & MFG, CON RAILROAD AXLE-LIGHT PARTS AND REPAIRS Lucas Ave, ST, LOUIS, MO. 3Iention us when wrlting to INSULATED WIRES &CABLES The performance record of KERITE, covering over half a century, is absolutely unequalled in the whole history of insulated wires and cables. KEWTE INS*T?ED COMPANY k7. -FR u- Pr?E=L,E.>=-, Y?ILL< )l*

5 THE PRISCO-MAN NEWT~~ R. \Vr~aox. President E. A. Wrrsos, 2d V-Prest. L. R. J~II.L.AI?D. Treas Har.r.ow~.:~~.. V-Pres't t Qen'l Xgr. E. T. BRouGE. Secretary Jm. JfLTa. Auditor INDUSTRIAL LUMBER CO. CALCASIEU LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE LUMBER RAILROAD AND MINING TIMBERS A SPECIALTY ELIZABETH, CALCASIEU AND - / BRANCH OFFICES: CaIcmo Steger Building \lid~ira.kxn. Trmple.Ter. Ilonterei.ilex. ELIZABETH. An~uual Capacity Nilliou Feet 1 OAKDALE MILLS IN LOUISIANA / Paid-CP Capital and Sur~ior - - $4;300, THE DEARBORN PROCESS of treating locomotive boiler waters re auires no outlay of capital for installa tion of equipmknt; the manner of ap plying the treatment is simple; the cos per thousand gallons of water is les than bv any other method: and the de sired ~:esulis are assured if the treat ment is correctly used. Gallon samples of the waters requlre' for analysis. DEARBORN CHEMICAL COMPANY MCCORMICK BLDG. CHICAGC NO Railroad Man I CAN AFFORD TO BE WITHOUT 1 ACCIDENT I INSURANCE a Our Accident Policies afford the greatest benefits at the lowest cost, most liberal adjustment, and prompt payment. We paid in 1911 over $1,713,000 in accident benefits. SEE THE AGENT I / The Travelers Insurance Company HARTFORD, CONN. I The Greatest AccidentCo~npany in the World. Has paid over SG'2.000accide11t claims. Mention us when mritlng to GENERAL OFFICE8 : - - LOUISIANA United Supply & Manufacturing Co. RAILWAY EXCHANGE CHICAGO - Wool and Cotton Wiping and Packing Waste, Nuts, Bolts, Rivets, Spikes, Axles, American Rail Loader COMPANY XiICAGO... ILL. :ar and Locomotive Axles STEEL FORGINGS :I00 fo :<O,OOO IMNIU~.~ cneh. Rough Jlr~rhluc.d or l-'l~~i.uhed Complete. Crusher and Hoist Shafts A SPECIAI.TY 'he Standard Forgings Company SALES OFFICE: :nllwn.v Esehange UuClding, Chlengo. Works: Indiana Harbor. Ind. rtisers, it mill help us both.

6 There's a Safe Way to Handle a Track Jack Track jack sho11lc1 never be oyerxted inside of a 1.il11 if it can be :rvoicled. If it cannot be a~oided, Ile snre and get out a flag. Track jaclc outside of rail is the safe way.

7 The Man On The Job 1:. _\I. MOSELE\-, ltaciiini>t. Sorth Shops, Sp-ingficltl, No. This ortic-lc.:~*trs trxtrrdcti sec.orld prirr b~l ",Strfrtj~ ljrrcji~rrrr~ir~y " n publictrtior~ ofrrirry cirr.11 rrioi~tlr pri:r.s for irrticlcs bj* ''?'/~c~ Marl or1 the.fob." c-orlttrirrirr~j sl~yqrstiorrs, ctc., ~rltrtirlg to irrclr~str.itr1 nccitlcitt )re- ~*(~rrti(~r~.-(ti~liti)r,) AT!. csl)vricncc a, cscctiiig cilginccr for four yeass ha.; given me icoillc cliancc to ~)rovc that this is true. I hati cli;~rgc of erecting heavy m;lchinc~-y in s:~winills and ini~ics. 'l'he labor furiiisllctl ~nc \\.as n~ostl~r unskilletl ant1 tlic al)l)lianccs \vcrc \.cry crutlc. Sucli \\.orli is Iiamrtlous. _\Ty 61-ht ~i:o\.c \v;~s to ;14;~11ll)lc a11 the iilcii IIII(~CI- lile :111(1 tell ~li~ln just 11(.)\\. J hat1 pla~~nctl to lia~itilc tl~c \\.orl;, giving clctaili and then pointing out the tlangcr? I)ca~-ing iii 11iin(l tllat tlie m;ui on the job is tl~c onc to 111-otcct hii11,wli ant1 his fcllo\v-\vorlitncn isonl accidents; and \vitil this \vdl iii niind, inyself mid cre~v \vei-c 11xs11wnixd in ~vorking!or sat'ctj-. \I- it!^ this n:cthotl I rlcvcr c.~-ilqdctl one, Inan in foul- ycars,

8 al\vays lia\.ing a new crclv on cvcr~. jol) ant1 Inany times having ~icgrcjc.; and convicts for my crc\vs. "'.l'hc nian on :I s\vivcl cllair" can~lot shed rn~lcli light on tllc subject to "the man on the job." 'I'lic men 011 the job do not al\vays lakc \vcll to the itlea.; of tlic 111:~~ C)II the s\\,ivcl chair, in this movement for reducing intlubtrial accitlcnts. 'l'hc Inan on the job looketl at it n.; I~cing hcnelicial to tlic Illan on the s\\.ivcl chair antl thought that thc ~novcnlc~it colizcr-lictl l;iliiscle only as Ixiug in a meaiurc iorcetl to cal-r-!; out miietliing for tlic 1i1;111 on the s\vi\wl chair. 'rlic Inan on the jol) is,cnsitivc. 1)ut (lots 1101 rc:~so~~ ill \:cry many tliffcrcnt \\.a)-s. IIc \.ic\\:s most all things f~-om ;l sclfisli \.ic\\.l)oint, ant1 here is your chance to p t him in iront in..;~ca(l of in tl~c I-car- of Illis I'crsonai 1nj~11-y l'revcntio~~ l\lo\:cnicnt, antl I~I-monizc Lllc Inan 011 the job in the same way as tllc 1)antlmastcl- doe.., his nlusicians, \\:it11 the undcrstantling that carelesslies.; is tlangerous to d l in tllc shop and factol-!;, ant1 that salety and tl~ouglitful~icss are I~cnefcial to all. Pumpless Tank A unique feature of the tank recently erected at Proctor Oltln., is that it requires no pump or puntper, Since 1879 Robert A. Kirkpawick has met the lwymnster on every tri]) lie made to P])ringf rltl,.\lo., si11c.e ls7h. Alr. K~rkpatriclt cntered the srrvic? of the later was Fris co, transfer- April 19, red to the 1879, as roundmachin- house ist at the where he North has serv- Spring- ed conf i e l d,. tinuoasiy Shops,.d. ', ' ' I up to the and about present a year time. Mr. Kirkpalrick is now sixty-five ycars old. hut is hale and hearty and (lops not take off his cap to any ol 11ie yonngcr men when he is assipnet1 n job of work. 1iein.q fillcd fron~ n spring about 11nIt' a mile distant. Miss L. E. Norgan of Fort Smith,.\rk., lorwarded to TIIE F~trsco-?.Ias 1)hotog1agll of the Proctor tank herewith re1)roduced. Tn.elire out of every thirteen elnployes killed, thirty-three out of every tltirll-lour en11)loyes injured, are in little accidents, not in collisions or derailment~, so try to prevent little accidents.

9 r, I wc~llly-six ;i:;c'~lts of l11o i<cbtl ILiver I)ivisi~u ;~tte~~d(!d tl~e t nee ling of the 1,oc:al 1;reight Agenls' *\ssoci:ltion at Ok~nulgce, Oltla., Septe~uber 22. :viany iu~l)orl:~nl items of interest to lhe a:;c\~~ts wcw discussed at the ~nceting, aud :ul interesting address w;ls made by L. C. JIcCutcheon, assistant superintendent freight loss and tla~~i.:~ge claims. Red River Agents Meet Mr. McCutcheon called attention to Ihe [act (I~athough hlisir~ess had increased on the IWsco since 1909, claim payrnents had decre:lsed ten per cent in tliat period. IIe explaiu~d that this W:IS 1)arlly t111c to tlle c;lrel'ul csa~nination I)$ the Sp~'ingficltl ollice, as well as the division onice, inlo the cause Cl.AlMS-0. S. & IYs, 'Y. G. S~ui(l~. IIoldenville, Okla.; ;I. Id. Stinson, Idnol' cvery claim for lost or da~n:~ged bel, Oltla.; TV. H. l)eck, Kin~slon, I'reight on tl~e railroad. in this man- Okla. ner the malter is brought to the attention of the party responsible and Lhe necessary improvement effected. TR.4NSPORTATION-George Car- h communicat.ion from Superintendent Hopkins, read at the meeting, gave figures showing t.he progress made by agents on the Red River Division in getting out pink slips. It lvas tlecitled that too mwh i~nportauce c:oulcl not be attached to the matter of getl.ing out pink slips, as the revenue of thc railroad depends to a great c,slcnt upon successful solicitation. 3Ianj' iml~ortnnt lettcrs fsom l)cggrell, superinl6ndent freight loss and damage claim wit11 reference to solicitation of freight, checking oc freight, the condition of warehouses, surl)lus statio~lery, etc., were read and discussed at the meeti~~g. Also the important circulars issued by Mr. 1)c:grell since the I8nt nlwting of the association. I1 has 1)ce11 dcritlctl lhal the n~eeling oc the associatiou will be l~eld only Tow times a year, in March, Jr~ne, September and ileccmber, instead of every month as fornlerly. The following oficers were elected to serve lor the ensuing year: F. T. Coffin, Ilugo, Oltla., president; W. L. Alsup, Madill, Oltla., vice-president; and R. W. Berry, Foreman, Oltla., secretary. Committees were appointed to serve I'or this year as follows: JCSECUTVII: - I. AIcNair, Atln., Oltln., 7'. 13. A~nos, i\rd~nore, Oltl:~.; Tir, i\. Simco, Wort Towson, Okla. denhire, Denison, Tes.; J. A. Bnrnard, Fraucis, Okln.; R. L. Lightsey, Haworth, Okla. :\CCOUI\;TING-S. D. King, Hope, Ark.; L. C. Beggs, Olrla.; C. S. Smith, Roff, Okla. TiZ.\FI~IC-G. A. Brundidge, Okmulgee, Oltla.; S. A. Broolis, I-Ie~~ryetta, Okla.; T. 0. TVinland. Valliaut, Olila. EE'FICIENCY-G. 0. Hollo\v, \\releetlca, Oltla.;' 3. T. Uodson, Ueuni~lfiton, OItIa.; M. C. Davis, I<andolph, Oltla. The ageuts who attended the meeting were: J. Donohue, Kieler, 01th.; C. B. Cook, Soper, Okla.; C. S. Smith, Rofr, Oltla.; TV. L. Alsnp, Madill, Oltla; G. 0. Hollow, Weleetktr, Okln.;.J. T. L)odson, Bennington, Oltla.; H. E. I'endergast, Boltchito, Oltln.; J. Id.

10 8 THE FRISCO-MAN Hart, Spaulding, Okla.; S. G. \Vood, Sasakwa, Okla.; I. PIcS'air, ACa, Okla.; F. T. Coffin, Hugo, Okla.; J. A. Uarnard, Francis, Okla.; Miss E1iz;~bet11 Banks, claim clerk, Ada, 01th.; It. \r. Berry, Foreman, Ark.; I?. G. I3ush, Ashdown, Ark.; S. L. Stinson, Idabel, Okla.; \V. A. Henry, Boswell, Olila.; J. T. Holmes, Roby, Okla.; &I. C. Davis, \Voodville, Okla.;.I. &I. \\!hitin#, Ravia, Oltla.; S. I). King, Ffope, Ark.; \r. L. OWCII, AIead, Okla.; G. H. Turner, Rlue, Oltla.; B. L). Fol- Ion, Sulphur, 01th.; (:. A. Erundidge, Okmulgee, Okla.; L. C. Norrnan, Beggs, Okla. A. Hilton, P. T. M. A circular issued by Ileceiver and Chiel' Traffic Officer 13'. R. niddle an- Ilounces the pron~otion of Cretlcral 1':~ssenger Agent A. I-lilton lo posilion or passenger traffic nlanager of thc Vrisco, effective Oct.ober 15tli. \\'hen you feel inclined lo neglect some Safety precaution, violate a rule or take a chance, stop and think: My Family, XJ' Fellow Ern~loyes, My Company. are Depending on me and 1Csl)rc.t Inc to Do My Iluty. I)?( lay the (rrlst. 1 will not The man who takes chances cam- 11lc:s and I he gambler dorw1'1 live wl~o can win alw:~ys. In games of chancc today's loss may be won back to- ~norro~v, but when you gamble and lose, Mr. Railroad Man, tllc eye, hand, foot or Iife, you pay, is never won brick. You cannot aft'ord to take chances. You arc not expected to. In fact, yon are earnestly asked not to do it,. Trespass Laws More Needed Than Steel Cars The Bureau of Railway Xews and Statistics is distributing postal cards on which is printed, under the above cnl)tior~, the following table of lntalities charged to United States railways in 22 years, 1890 to 1912, inclusive: ICille(1 Pcr Cent. 'J'rospassc.rs ,SFG 53.8 I':mr~losws through Lhcir own fault or mischancr.....,40, ULhrl, pvl.sons Lhrougli Ihei~ own Cault or n~iscl~anc.(~ s 9.5 I~:~nl~log'ers in :~cci~lcnt~ to tr'ains.... (;1) 13, I'assrng'crs IhroupIi thcil' own fault or rnisch;~ncc I';ls~c.ngc~.s in :iccid~nts to trains 'I'oLal for 23 ycvir.~ T; Aunl yuis. '1'hruugh their own C:.iult or ~nischnncr , In :iccidcnts Lo 1r;rins , (a) OI' thrsr. :lt lrast 50 per wnt. arr due lo Lllc rlrplig:-cnc.o or cnl'elrssness of the victim. ',So long as legislatol.~, comn~issions and critics rivet their attention on steel cars, which may cause, but nevel- avel't, a collision or derailment, the tale of railroad fatalities will grow along the line of' the greatest percentage of causes," says the bureau.-ex.

11 THE FRISCO-MAN 9 Traffic Sermons Born of Experience,4n agent was unable to find a box of dry goods for which he had billing when consignee called to take delivery, and gave a notation of shortage, making a short report sho\ving box short from car. The shippers duplicated the missing box, which contained seasonable dry goods worth $350.00, and filed claim for their loss. which was paid. About four nionths later a shipment of household goods which had becn stored at the station in question was talten from storage and the box of dry goods discovered. The I~ouseholtl goods mere in the warehouse when t.he dry goods arrived, and had been removed from the premises and placed in other storage soon after. The box of dry goods was removed with the household goods, and the agent in whose care it. was, could not say how it came about. There could be no reason except failure to properly check the hot~sehold goods out of warehonse. The Cowpany has the box arid will sell it for whatever it will bring. The box contains dry goods for the spring of this year. Merchants are now buying their fall and winter stocks, and next spring's styles will have changed until we cannot espect to realize more than fifty cents on the dollar, which makes our net loss abo~~t $ This is only one item of Lhe large amount paid every year for pacltages which are lost through improper warehouse supervision. filed claim for $309.00, and we find ourselves o~~tstancling the diff'erence betwee~~ the two rates and with no means of enforcing the released valuation clause because the bill of lading wns not made speciflc when issued. If the agent had merely talten the time and made his notation similar to this: "In consideration of the transportation of this shipment at the rate of 15c per cwt. by the carrier, the shipper declares that each article does not esceecl $10.00 per cmt. and agrees that in case ot loss or clamage, claim shall not be Itled or paid for a greater valuation," and had the shipper signed it, in addition to his signature to Lhe bill ol lading, we could compel thr: claimmt to observe his part of the contract. Several claims haw l~ecn received lately where bills of lading, resented to agents for signalure, were dntcd back several days and the date not ~ioted by the agent and clainis filed for asserted delay in transit on carload shipments of grain that were Dart of a contract covering several cars which were to be shipped within a specified length of time. - Olten claims are receivea covering ship~nei~ts billed via wrong routes, caused by iigerils acceptiug billing over 'phone and misunderstanding the routing instructions given by shippers. In one instance recently the phone billing was not confirmed in writing An agent recently accepted a car of by shippers and consequently the housellold goods on n bill of lading bearing the abbreviation "0 R Rel." This car mas transported for the rate applyhy on household goods released error was not detected uutil the car reached destili:~tio~~ on the wrong delivery t.raclt. hgeuts cailuot be too careful in seelo $to.o(l jwr v\vt.. 11~1 the cn~~sign(v? ing tli:~( c:\c11 a~id cavory bill (if Incling

12 -"- 10 THE FRISCO-MAN - A. is properly dated and correctly made out. Xore than a year ago, in his address before the National Hay Association, on July.16, 1912, Chairman Prouty of the Interstate Commerce Commission said : "No man can foretell whether in the years to come it will be or it will not be necessary to allow some increases in the transportation charges of our railroads. If that time comes, it will be rl~e duty of the Commission to permit that advance. It will not only be - its duty as an act of justice, but it would be its duty to you In the highest conservation of your interests." While the Commission hesitates to perform an obvious duty, American railway credit is discredited in the money markets of the world. The necessity for an advance in freight rates which was urgent in 1910 is still more presslng today. The railway can know no genuine relief whilc operating expenses and taxes ahsorl) over '73% of tilcir revenue derived from carrying freight and passengers at unrelnunr,ratire rates. Chance=Takers. Crocker Force. "A11 railroad men are not chancetakers, but there are n fen;," says the The station force at Crocker, No., yardmaster of a railroad. is shown in the acconlpanying repro- "A trainman who throws the switch duction. Reading from left to right, and does not lock it or latch it, which- are: W. B. McEvilley, third trick opever is required by rule, is headi~~g you into trouble. A fireman who rails to put the water crane or other appliances in their proper place may cause you to be knocked from your train. The flagman who does improper flagging may do a job of short flagging on you some day and let you collide with his train. "The engineer and cond~~ctor who rwt their train by dnnger signals curry you to the hospital. The operator who sleeps under a clear signal and wakes up at the call of the key and takes an order for your train after you have passed, heads you to the cemetery. It is such men that we brand as chance-takers. "You are very familiar with the chancz-taker and it is your duty to get him in line with this moverncnt or point him out to one of the officials. You owe this to poursclf, yollr fanlily and tllc con~pa~~y. You c:c?rl.i~inly know I11at 11111ess you gvl II~III, 11o v:ill gel you sooncr or 1:tLcr."--1':s.

13 Lp----pp -- THE FRISCO-MAN ~ \ As Foreman Robert Fitzgerald, in the extreme left, being welcomed charge of Section G-68, Quanah, Texas, home by his little daughter - Roberta. together with his gang, arrived at the Air. E'itzgernld has been elnployed on car house recently, just at quitting the Quanah Sub-Division for the last Lime, tile above photograp,, taken. Foreinan Fitzgerald may be seen on ten years. A

14 12 THE FRISCO-MAN Harry Hop An article entitled, "Harry, Hop the Train," written by ddward L. Tinker, Safety Supervisor, El Paso and Southwestern Railroad, has been published in booklet form, attractively illustrated, by the Safety Bureau of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad, lor distribution among employes. In brief, the article deals with a little newsboy, Harry Hopper, who lost a leg in an attempt to hop a train. The child was the son of a former railroad man, who, while kicking in a coupling, had his foot so badly mashed that amputation was necessary. Being unable to continue in railroad service Harry's father purchased a news stand and sold papers for a living, the boy assisting him by taking papers out to sell. Harry took up his stand near a railroad station, and while there selling his papers had often noticed switchmen and brakemen jump trains when they were going fast, ride a may, and then swing off. After a short while Harry got into the habit of playing wound freight trains and later as they went slowly by would jump on the step, ride a little may, and then jump off. When warned of the danger of this pernicious habit, Harry would reply, '*l've been hopping these trains for a r~)onth and never got hurt, so 1 guess nothing can happen to me." One day, Itowever, as Harry made a junlp to the step of a box car, his foot slipped and he hung dangling by his hands. liis strength gave out, his hands gradually loosened their grip and he fell to the ground. One poor little leg struck across the rail and the heavy stpel wheels passed over it. rl'i~o~~qh H:lrry s(.l'(?nlll~d ill :lfrolly, The Train no one heard, until after some time the conductor on the rear platform looked out and saw a huddled heap beside the track. The train wn, stopped immediately and the crew ran down to where the boy was lying, almost dead. Together they picked Harry up, carried him to the station and later conveyed him in ambulance to the hospital. He was laid upon the operating table and the doctors cut away his trousers and shoes and then with a sharp saw cut off his poor little leg just above the knee. Harry awoke from the effects of the chloroform in great pain. He lay In bed for weeks and weeks and during this time his father would hobble out to see him with his mother and little sister. Of course they all felt badly and his mother would cry because she knew her little boy wonld be a cripple for life and would never be able to play around like other boys, or ride a bicycle and skate and run and juml) and play baseball. He gradually grew better and when he was able to leave the hospital the trained nurse who had been vcry good to him, bongi~t him a little pair of crulches. Harry then went to the country lo stay with his grandfather until hc fully recovered from his dreadful accident. While there he matched the children at play, particularly the boys enjoying n splnsh in the old swimming hole. He sat on the bank and sighed, and, tl~ough he did not tell anyone, his little heart was nearly breaking as he realized that nerer again could he join the boys in the saimmin~ pool. Ax IIP h:11 Il~erc. IIV lho~~.~l~t lo I~inl-

15 THE FRISCO-MAN sell', "It ivould be fca~,ful to 11;lve any or the other litlle boys or girls lose :I leg as I did. If they only li~~e\\l IIOW 1n11c11 it hurt and Ilow hart1 it is not to play around like other children, they would never go near a Creight train." Harry later returned to the city and began selling papers Cor his father again. As he thought over his ~nisfortuue, an idea came to hiin. Going 1111 lo llie gen~ral oflices 11e saw a ma11 silting at a desk. "Arc yon the Inan at the head of tliis railroad," lie asked. "No, I am oniy the superintendcnl..,\~lything 1 can do for J~OII?" Ilarry then related to the sul~erinlentlcnt Ilow he had lost a leg and said, "I don't want to have any other little boys or girls to have the same thing happen to them that I had. If you can fix it I'd like to go to a!l the schools and talk to the cl~ildren." The superintendent assured Harry that it would be all right, so he started out on his journey and went through many cities. 111 each place he talked to the little boys and girls, explaining to them if they would always remember the seven "Nevers" they \irould ]lot get hult by railroad lrains ar~tl lose a as Ile had. Harry Hop the Train's Seven Nevers. 1. Nevcr cross the tracks by night or by day, \Vill~out stopping to listen :III~ look rach nwy. 2. Scl'cr m:llli along thc railrand ties- You can't alwtiys trust youl' c;ll.s and cycs. :. h'evcsr hop a I'reiyht, lor nollling quite hcals The nouncl rcccired under grincling' wheels. 4 Xcvcr, on a hot or sunny d;ly, Sit bcncath box cars to rcst or play. 5. Xever crawl under a car of freight \Vhen the crossing's blocked. -play safe and wait. 6. Xcver board, or alight from, a train that is moving; Accidents, daily, its danger are proving. 7. Sever play g:jmcs 'round the tracks at thc station- There are much saler places to seek recreation. Section Men Meet Roadn~aster A. SI~PITP~ has just re- cenlly inaugurated a plan to have ~neetings of his section foremen as often as possible to cuable the men to get together and exchange ideas and to give th~m opportunity to be- come better accluai~ited. The meet,ing at Fort S~nilh, Ark., October 8, at which fifteen foremen were present, was a decided success in every way. Speeches were made by Mr. Sherrey and each of the foremen on variou; subjects pertaining to track worlr, economy and material, and much time was given to discussion as to how ro keep switch lights burning with best resuits. Difficulties were thrashed out and reports and time books gone over, and each man had a bunch of new ideas invaluable to section work.

16 14 THE FRISCO-MAN Business and Politeness A Kew l'orli man writing to 'I'll(> SWI ~nak~s 01)serwlions 111)on 111~ courteous tendency of service corporation in that city, md what fits the situation in the great metropolis npplies ecl~~ally, no doubt, to the manners in vogue in citics in different parts oc Lhc country. Tlle Scw Yorlier said: "People judge a public service corporation or any business concern by the conduct of those of its employes with whom they colne in contnc.1: il' these show conrteons ~011sider;ltion it is easy to believe that they are l~ut obeying the moving ilnpulsc oc tl~:-, man at thc head. Such mastar, s11c.11 man. "And in all wrillen co~nrn~~~lic:ltio~~s I'rom such concerns, or Cram clup:~~,lment heads, \ye are likely now to lincl the note or politeness very clearly struck; we may get from the very biggest concerns letters that show a manifest desire to be courteous, all very agreeable. To be sure not everybody yet shows this desire; there are some who have not yet awakened to this tendency of the times, and lhcn there are some, struggling in their awakening, who are bungling in thoir efforts in this direction. But it may safely be said that the great majoril) of public service corporations and of business concerns now seek to serve the public acceptably, with all d~rc consiileration. And this is all ccrtainly delightrul. "The greatest thing in the world is good manners. Nothing SO rn1.1~11 softens the asperities of life, nothing so much makes life, for all of us, comfortable and worth living. And certainly we are improvi~~g ill our mall- Ilers. \ire are getting on."-exchn~~ge.

17 1:. C. Spaulding, chairman of the Ccntri~l Safety Committee, attended the J11ly meeting of the St. Louis Terminal Safety Conlmittee aud Springfield Terminal Safety Committee; also the September meetings of the uew colz~mittees at Chaffee, Memphis, Thayer, Clinton, Springfield, Sapulps and Neodesha. THE FRISCO-MAN 15 Safety First News Mrs. E. G. Newland, editor of the \Vo~nan's Department of THE FRISCOivI.\s, was present at the meeting of the Kansm Division Safety Committee ilt Keodesha, for the purpose of personally seeing in detail how Il'risco men were carrying on the movement for the prevention of personal injury in work and travel on the St. Louis k San Francisco Railroad, and she gives in this issue her impressions of this meeting in the Woman's Department. The chairman of the Central Safety Committee states that he found unabated interest being taken in the work of accident prevention, the spirit of which had been greatly stimulated by the fine results secured during the fiscal year ended June 30th. 1913; that interest is steadily and constantly spreading as time goes by to n greater 11um1)er of employes is made ~nnnifest by the corlstimtly increasing ratio of reduction in the casualty list, compared with any similar preceding period of time, The chairman of the Central Safety Committee states that one of the inost jnl~restins Yentnrcs of these meetings itrr? the essays or Iutpers rcwd I)!. somv one or more of the mcnlbers of the uo~nrnietee ou some aspect of the si~fcl y subject, :~nd w11ic.h yrovc3 by ;~rgt~~~~ent a11t1 ill~~stratio~~ the i~nportal1c:c of i~~tlivitlual effort for the grwr- est degree of success in accident preven tion. The follo~ving division, terminal and shop Safety Committees were selected July 1, 1913: E.hSTERS DIVISION SIFETY COJI- XITTEl3..J. F. Simms, Superintendent (Chairman): J. Rib, Roadmaxter; B. A. Denton, Roadmaster; J. TIr. Morrill, En- gineer; J. T. Wicker, Conductor; 0. >:. B~.adwny, Brakeman; A. C. Lile, Fi1.eman; IV. I). Smith, Switchman; J..J. Rrown, Car Inspector; P. Nelson, Scction Foreman; F. I\,?Jc.\rthur, 3Iastcr Mechanic; J. I. Woodfill, Agent; J. It. Scott, hsst. Supt. 1,oco. Fuel Servicr;.I. 31. Sills, T)istrict Engineer. \\ ES'FIIRY DIVlSlOS S.iFErFY CO3I- 31 IT'I1J4E..I. >I. Chandler, Superintendent (Chnirman); G. A. Ermatinger, A. 8. L. I... Service; E. C. Whitney. Foreman Watev Service; W. F. Boone, Engineer; Henry Beneke, Fireman; A. H. Hart, Xachinist; Wm. Xead. Car Repairer; J. J. Bernard. Conductor; G. W. Durkee. Brakeman; H. N. Shelton, Switchman: James Frost, Section Foreman; J. R. Wood. ('ES'I'RAL I)I\'ISIOX SAI'ICTY C ITTEE. \V. C. Koch, Sur~crintcnrlcnt (Chairman); 1c.ranli nurns. JIastcr Mccllanic; IL Pylc, General Car Foreman; G. 1:. Bcrger, A. S. L. F. S.; A. hdams, Conductor; I.'. r. Litten, Yard Engine Forcman: S..\. Williams. Section Foreman: TI. 1.'. JIoward, I'asscnzer 1~1~nlicm:in; 1.:. 31. Shuford. I~ircman; G. C. Zlugli~~?;. Gc.ncraI Jt7o1wn:tn; J. I<..lIt~I'fe~,t, A[g%nt:.I. C. JIofC, I<nginccr; C. Tt. Joril(~n. '17~~;~vvlinc.\g-cnt;.J. N11lso11, G<.nv1,;11 VOI.CI~~II U. & I<,; J. (:. 'I'~~ylor, I)is~ri!~( l,;nginct,~.; Dr. J,.I, l''oltz, 1>ivisio11 SIIIP yeun. SO1 TI1 \\ I*:Sl'F<ItY DI\~I!410\ S \I"I*;'I'V CO31 11 ITrrElc. S '1'. (.'<~II[ 1,!-11, SLI ~~(~~~irtt.c~~ri(~~~ (('II;I i 1,- I~I:IIL); 1,:. >\l,t,;~l~an~w~i, I<u~idn~:~hti~l';.I,

18 16 THE FRISCO-MAN P I.'. Long, Master Mechanic; H. J. Joynt, Gen'l Car Foreman; A. C. Hlnckley, Eng-ince~,; C. E. Huff, Brakeman; Wm. Baker, Brakeman; D. 0. Shields, Engine Foreman; W. H. Hutchison,.\gent; I?. S. Nancc, Conductor; R. J. JIcPrinn, Switchman; S. Col>eland, Bridge Forcman; D. A. Bowersock, Gcn'l Foreman B. B. & W. S.; F. 11. Anderson, Asst. Superintendent; A. Lewis, Section Forcman; J. Gambill, Fireman; R. D. Purcell, ConcluctoI'; F. l~esslcr, Engineer; T. F. Fogcl, Fireman. - ICAXSAS DIVISIOX S.\I?E'TT COM- MIl'TEIG. 11. H. Brown, Supcrlntcndcnt (Chalrman); J. P. Sheehan, Roadmaster; Wm. Henry. Naster Xechanic; Geo. TaafCe, Agent; F. N. Galloway, Fireman; n. S. VanHorn, Brakeman; N. C. Ketring. Conductor; I. N. LaChapelle, Car Fore- man; J. W. Waterbury, Concrete Foreman; 31. I?. Holmes, Section Foreman; C. S. Havens, Enginc Forcman; lwilnk Ellis, Engineer. RED RIVER DIVISION S.\FETY COM- MITTEE. C. F. H'opltins, Superintendent (Chairman); A. H , Dispatcher, T. W. Byrne, Engineer; W. F. 3Iorrow. Fireman; N. Flood, Concrete Foreman; B. D. Fallon, Agent; Fred Campbell, Conductor; J. F. Robertson, Engineer; E. L. Hill, Conductof; W. C. Reynolds, Engineer; J. S. Garner, Brakeman; L. &I. Simmons, Brakeman; R. \V. Berry,,\gent; Clarcnce Ward, JIachinist Aprentic ice; 0. J. illas, Car Insl1ector; C. S. lilmrcy, Scction Forcman. O%.\RIC DIVISION Y.\PETY ('OYYI'F- 1'EK C. 13. Bnlteell, Superintcndent (Chairman); F. D. Thayer, Conductor; W. N. NcKenzie, Switchman; R. C. Holme~, Conductor; A. A. White, K~~;~lceman; J. H. Smith, Switrhman; Jlay Eallard. Enzincel,; 1-1. F. Kirlil)atl.ick, Division Foreman; TV. 11. IIol~nes. ISnginccr; J. ;\. Langford, lirakc~nan: I4':lrrlu- I~arson, Hoadninstor. - Reeves, Section Foreman; J. JI. Brown, Fireman; R. 31. Calloway, Car Foreman; H. C. Clark. Brakeman; W. C. Shannon. Engineer; Zwald, JIachinist; T. J. Hard. Switchman; J. 1'. IIouk, Agent. XORTHERS DIVISIOS SAFETY COM- MITTEE. T. B. Coppage, Superintendent (Chairman); C. L. Elliott, Section Forcrni~n; U. L. Young. Agent; J H. West, Agcnt; I Lcfler, Conductor; F. Morrell. E~~altcman; B. C. Manlove, Engineer: 1'. C. Knight, Agent; 1'. I,, hndcr~on. Bralieman; J. P. Bessy, Engineer; G. It. Carson, Yardmaster; J. G. Boncstcc.1. Machinist; Lewis Wcsterhouse, 31:~chinist; J. 31. Hopkins, Car 1nsl)cctor; Wm. Simpson, Car Inspector; S. 1.'. 3Iclton, Foreman B. & B.; Joe Liglitwinc. Fireman; J. L. Greenup, Agent; R. 13. Malone, Asst. Supt. Local Fucl Scrvicr; C. D. Swearengin, Yardmaster. ItlVldR.\ND CAPE DIVISIOX SAWI*:l'Y COJI3IITTP:E. 0. H. McCarty, Superintendent (Chuirman); J. A. Henshaw, General Voreman; L. L. Kerns, Asst. Dist. Zngr.; W. 0. Finney, Divislon Surgeon; J. Y. Lambert, Roadmaster; J. B. Gilliam. Genl. Car Foreman; J. A. Xoran, Agcnt; H. I3. Washburn, Jr., Conductor; R. J. Harrell, Brakeman; Sam Frissell, Engineer: 3.1. H. Wcston. Fircman; A. A. Lawler, Inspector; C. Dean, Switc11- man; Wm. 3l. Frcnch, Scctlon Forcmun; C. 11. Claiborne, Asst. Supt; J. C. Bryan, Asst. Supt. Loco. Servlcc; \V. H. Brookc. Genl. l.'orcman B. 8: B. ST. LOUIS '1'EHIII.YII.Y S.\I6'JG1I'Y COMMITTEE. P. W. Conley, Superintendcnt (Chairman); F. Rychliclii, (:hicf Clcrk to.\gent Scvcnth St.; C:11.l Gel'tics, Chicf Clcrlt to Agent Eroad\ray;.\, 31cCo1,- mick, Gcncral Forc~nari I<oundl~ousc; E..I. Slaltcry. Pard Clerk; 1". C. licnton. J,oading Clerk; ICd. Ltr\riv, C;lr Inrl~cctol,; Llrn UUIIII, S. l.'orcnlan: C. 11. Brumn, Switch Forcn~an; 0. 'I. Lodcr, Switch Forcn~an; T. JI(~rris. Sect. Switch E'orcman;.I. L. Iliu'tforcl; IQyincc,~.; 71,t1.1.>- I1icl.c(,, l.:nginr(.r; U..\I. I,il~l~l[,, I), S<~c~Li~jn~ndn; Gcu, Gruu~~~ls,

19 THE PRISOO-MAN C;c~,.tio~~ I.'orr~na~~; E. L)eRuellc, Yartl- ~nastvr.;.t. S. JlcGuigan, Division Roadnl:rstci,; (:em Vogel, C:. C. to 'oreninn ('. TWpt.; G. A. Black, ;\Incl~inist; 1%'. A. lioctxlcr, Hoilcrnmlccr; kxlward Coc, Car Inapcctor; 11. Travis, Car Insprctor; V. 11. llnrt, Conductor. SI'RISGI~'IE1.V TERJIIXAL S.LYETIr COJ1311l'TEE. 1,. N, Bausctt, Superintendent (Chuirman); R. G. \\'all, Switchn~an; I.'. >I. ( Icnginccr; Joe Shoclcley, Sec. I.nl,orr~; C. 14'. Normnn, Fireman; R..I. Ry;~n,,\ssl. 1t. N. Pircman; \\'. C. liir~g, Inspeclor; J. 1i. Itay, l~'urcn~an Tic Y;~rtl; \\I. 11. Jordan, Baggage.\gc.nl; J. I). Rilrrow, Stcvcdo~,~: A. FI. (;I.;;?,, S. 11. Forcmnn; J. C, Altridge, Scr;~p 'J'rack Foremiln; 3C. I\. Johnson, 13. & 13. I~orc-11i;~n: J. A\. XI:lr.shall. Marl~inisl; \\;. li. SLc\var't, Yardmostcr. Steel Gang Foreman; E..I. Eicholtz, Car Foreman; Wni, Williun~s, T~.rlc.li lltln; 1". I<:. Morgan, hccountont. JIKJII'HIS TICR31ISdL S.\F.E'I'Y COJI- MITTUE. E. L. Magern, Suljerintcndent (Chairman); C. 3. Dcan. Yardmaster; W. L. Jordan, Xachinist; C. It. Crowlcy, Boiler Inspector; C R. Creamer,,\Inchinist; J. A. Nurray, Jhgineer: T. 6. Roescl, Fireman; H. H. Sn~ith, Chicf Clerk to Agent; J. 11. I<endrick, Clcrk: \IT. Johnson, Conclucto~.; ( TVliitnry, Gcnl. Car Borcmi~n; J. S. Jowcrs, Car Foreman; C. 11. l'uync, 13lnclcsn~ill1; Snow, B. & 13. I*'orc.~n;ln; \VIII. 1<;1y, Switchman. - SOICrl'H[ SII)l+: SHOI'S S.\I?IM'T COJIn1lTrl'IQ JIcGlasson (Chai~.mun), J. 1;:..\lit- cl~~ll, X. 8. \ViIltins. I\.iSS.\S CITY TERRISAI. SAl.'E'I'Y - COJIMITTEE. SPRISCPIELD NEW SHOPS S.\lqTE:TY J. 1 n i n Sulrt~rintrnclent CO3I 31 IT11E14. (c'l~:~irrn;~n); C. 1,. Croolil~n~n, Switch- J. E. Henslinm, Superinlcndcnt of rn:.ln; I.:. I.. lt:~k:ln, JCngineer; J. 13. Kyle, Shops (Chairman); A. Id. Schoficld, Section Forcman; G. W. I'ctry, Brakc- Asst. Foreman Conch Sho11; IIar1.y ni:ln; JI. 1". Fli~nix:~n, Asst. Y~~~~clrnrrstcr; Rnycs, Blacltsmith; Jno. Xltbc~.g, B..I. Glenson, Chicf Clcrlc lo L. 11'..\.; Eoilcrmalier; C. 14. Gust:~fson, Xla- ;\. J5. Clark, Machinist; J. 31. Duncan, chinist; Jas. Bell. Painter. Apprentices, Kausas City, 310. Shops. Left to right: John Nachbar, J. Cashman, W. Noore, Jerry Simpson, D. L. Cooper, F. E. Anderson, H. E.\Voods, Charles Stackhoff.

20 THE PRISCO-MAN Safety First I)I1. J..I. l'oia'l'%- Safety ('ot!ltn1tlremfi11. Subject: How Can Greater Co-Operation in Accident l'revrntion IIiork IK Secured Among the Employes of the Division? l('ron1 the great book of Wisdom ulcl from the lips of Christ we have Lhe injunction. "Let your light so shine before men that they may see your good works and glorify your Father which is in Heaven; hide not your candle under a bushel." In other words, if the object of your labors be good and your motive pure, let in the light, let the world know what you are trying to do and you may depend upon it that you can secure the co-operation of enough good men to make this work, whatever it may be, successful. This has been most thoroughly demonstrated in the Safety First movement. This great movement, and it is unquestionably the greatest movement for good that has ever been inaugurated in this country by any great company or organization, was at first opposed and regarded with no small degree of suspicion by the men and this feeling to a lesser degree still pertains in some sections. It is, however, slowly but surely disappearing as the men come to understand it better, which brings us back to the point at which we started. If me are to make a success of this movement the Inen in every tlepartment, from the highest official to the most humble section hand, must understand it thoroughly; those who do not know must be taught. It is not enough to have Safety First meetings by members of the Committee, the different railroad organizations should take it up. There are many different ways which could be tlloaght out which would cause them to talk Safety First topics at their meetings. The great body of section men, and brldge men should be educated to t.he value, to them, of this movement and this education should be done by means of open meetings which every one is urged to attend. The movement should by no means stop at the prevention of injury, but. should also take up the l~rerention of disease. The men should be taught how to keep well. An attempt. to do this would greatly increase the confidence of employes generally in Safety First for it would tend to prove to them that it was their welfare that xas being looked after. -4 close study of the cause of injury and siclcness both in and out of the railroad service will develop the fact that by far the greater part of both are caused Prom two things: first, ignorance; second, carele%sness ; both these can be entirely overcome. It is only necessary to educate the employes to the dmger of certain procedures and customs and, what is equally important, to the willingness on the, part of the company Lo malte mch customs unnecessary and :~t once accidents will begin to diminisl~. The officials sllould devote every possible energy to making the men in every departmei~t understand that there is no hot air in this movement, that it is a sincere and earnest effort to better conditions and that if conditions are to be better it nlrlst be

21 Il~ror~gl~ ll~r 11nilcbt1 action ol: llic ern- but Illis regret, all ar01111d does no1 1)Io~c~. 1,et 1Ile1n see that lllis is l~ring 1)acli 111~ swit~llnlnn's Loot, the sound In~siness sense, good for both engineer's job, or the company's esemployer ant1 enlgloye. periencecl man. h switclnnan does not derive any pleasure from getting his foot mashed olt tl~rougl~ the carelessness of the engineer and the company does not enjoy losing the services of an euperienced employe because of a preventable accident, neither does the careless engineer enjoy getting fired; Any one can see that it would have been infinitely better for all concerned had the accident not occurred and it could have been prevented just as thousands like it could have been prevented, and in the future, through the medium of Safety First, will be yrevented. A Cow Shepherd eight months old Jcrsey bull sl~own in the reproduction and stalcs thal It. C:. Shepl~erd, bridge dispatcl~er, Lhe animal is the finest ol' its age on ;\lempi~is, Tenn., ranks well up among the b'risco lines. our veteran employes, having rounded out twenty-fire years of continuous service. Since his connection with Poe and Gang Herman I'oe, bridge foreman, Central L)ivision, und part of his gang the Frihco Mr. Shepherd has been constantly employed at Memphis and durlllg llis ye;lys of sclvice has never missed a pay day. JIr. Sllepllerd is the onrller of the are shown in the accompanying re- ~~roductioll. 3Ir. Poe has been connected with the Frisco for the last twenty-five years, serving both in the track and B. & B. de~lnrtmellts.

22 20 THE PRISCO-MAN View of yards and slation, Jasper, So. 6;s. At tllis point lhe I. C. goes Ala. b'rom lert to right may be seen over ~ ~ trnclr i to nirming- ~ ~ passenger train Xo. 992, extra 954, I~am, Ala. switch engine, and I. C. R. R. extra Engine 771 leaving hielnp11is lor flagman; J. A. 3Iurmy, engineer; J. Harvard Yards. Left to right are, 11. wells, fireman. C. C. Hedriclr, conductor; C. H. Shell,

23 THE FRISCO-MAN "Go To It" Address delivered lo Apprenliceaoys a1 Springfield, Mo., Shops, Oclober3, 1913, by George IM.,'&sford, Chief Engineer, railroad dcparlrnenl, Joseph T. Ryerson and Son. New York, N. Y. 1,ast August the speaker had the their lives for the 1.1oor' worlrmanship. privilege of standing on the deck of a staunch steamer bound through the St. Lawrence River from Prescott to Thinli for a momcnt what workmanship means to a train load of running at high speed under AIontrcal. From a quiet, harmleas cur- a mountain along a river bank The rent thc river changcd to rapids with a tumult of conflicting wavcs, as high man who laid thc track, thosc who maintain it, those who watch it for ;IS a small housc. with swirls and rock slides, those who build the c11- whirlpools, and with rocks threaten- s-incs and the cars, thosc who mudc ing to smash the steamer into s~~linlcrs. the material of which rails, locomo- Through these dangerous rapids the tives and cars are made; all these as 1)ilot stood at the \\-heel-intent on well as the men who run the traintaking his charge through safely. perhaps a thousand men are involved IIis face was a study. IIc thought of in the safety of this one train. 1\11 nothing but the task hcfol-e him and the work of all these may end in the responsibility of his position. He disaster if one single workman fails was tensc, alcrt, app:~rently nervcsicss, to do his duty. So great then is thc confident. Approaching the point of importance of workmanship. greatest danger I watched his cvcry FIere id what I mcan.-you are fittiny movcment. With a deft tnrn of the 11-2 :I crank pin that is somewhat worn whecl we slid into a smoothcr part of the tumult. Then with a, quick chnngc he stcered for the roughest wate1.s of them all, bnt alwnys to cscapc the ~.oclts that were ready and n~illing to and you have it nearly right. Don't do their worst. It is a thrilling and an inspiring experience, thrilling because of the danger and inspiring because of the slclll, knowledge and abllity of the pilot. These qualities in the pilot arc most admirable, most important, but very rare. It is given to but a fcw men to perform such conspicuous scl'vice. The service is inspiring, but still more so is the essential without wllich the yilot would wreck his stcamcr in hcr first passage through the rapids. I refer t6 the workmanshiv of thosc \vho built the bo;~t-hcr en~incs and her equipment. \\lrh:1t if :L single split Itcy was missing- in htecl.ing K('~II"! What if thc tiller rojrc hnd Iwcn inlperfcctly inspccl<d tflat momirl,g? What if a followc~~ I~olt hat1 lircn left loose in one of thc pistons rbt Ihc rbn- ~incs? \Vhat if any onc,$i' ;I f c s w t11ous;~ncl nuts in tht: m:lchi~~(,~.y halt bcen sct ~ I cruss-tl~readed J or :I bwring Imcl bccn sc-t III) too tight? Tf so. wv<,r;11 Iiund~ml ~ w o ~ou1, ~. ~ I, ; ~ I ~ ~yitl~ ~ Icavc it that way of your own accord and don't listen to thc older workman who tells you it is good enough and that the b0s~es won't think any n1ol.c of you for doing it right. Do that job right as your moral obligation to thc world and to justify you in living and holding your head up as a man among men. A crank pin left a little rough is sure to heat. It may heat enough to crumble the brass and strip the whole side of thc engine, perhaps klll the engincer or fireman and ditch the train. Thc boy or man who does slovenly work in a railroad shop may be the rnurdercr, perhaps of his own father or brother. Bear this in mind in eve1.y job you do. Perhaps you have not thought of how the engineer tir1)cnds personally and individually u~~orl you on evc~,y foot of the road t11tl.t he d1,ivcs his engine ovrr. Hr tlocsn't Itnow you, pcrhap.?, but that n~nlces no din'crence. I~:versboily depend# upon good \vorkn~:~nsi~il~. Good workmanshil) is a pa1.t of nohilily. Poor wo~~ltmanshiy is eviilcncc of 1nora1 dr'gcne~.acy. There is nothing the industrial world needs as 11111(.h :IS it 11~~1s KOOII \v01.1t111e.n, nnil

24 22 THE FRISCO-MAN yet it is difficult to flncl them. Far too many good men must bc ernl~loyed to discover and correct thc defective work of the inefficient and the unslcilled. 'Yhe greatest curse of industry today is its dead load of those \vho Iaclc tlic clesire to take pains with thc \vork of their hands and b~,ains. A sloven could become a gcnius if he \voulcl take pains with his work. The safety of thousands of steamers and trains today lies not alone in good workmanship, but also in tlie consistent eliniination of poor workmanship. This should not be true and \\~oultl not if wo had mough of such apprenticeship as this and if cnough of our railroads had oflicials insl~ired as arc those of thc "I'.risco" to place before their rccr~lits the 01)- portunitirs wiiicll you enjoy. You are the most fortunate boys In thc country. You and u few others on railroads p~,oviding up-to-date apprenticeship. Do you appreciate this fact? See what is being clone for yon? You arc ingrates if you do not sit up nights to show your officers that they are wisc in spending stoclcholders' money so lavisl~ly to hell? you. What are you doing about it to indicate to them that the scheme is worth while and that you 'are worth so much of their thought and trouble? It costs the government some money to train a high most no exceptions they have no real pleasures. They give the world nothing. They are helplcss hangers-on. oflicer in the navy. Think for n mo- ~~arasites, living off the lives and work ment of how Perry, Farrngut, Dewey of others. Thcy arc tired of everyand othcrs proved that it was worth thing and thc worlcl tires of thcm. It while to train them It is necessary to tr:~in n:~\-;~l nirn, ant1 cvcrybody underis tlimcult them. to be ci~arit:~blc to\v;~r~l st;~n(ls this f:~r:t. I have for years Sons of ConiPoi~t;~l~ic h1c11-t~ii-sc. tllc~u~ht it cvcn morc i~~il)o~.t:~r~t to ally 11a1.c sorrlc cha~~c,c' ;;lnel tl~cy forlrl t~xir~ ;~l~l~rcrlticcs t11:ln naval nl~n, but :L ~,esl~cctalle ol~lss. 'I'llc~y I~;I> xu to t11u few irooplc havc Lcc!!~ Broad-mir~detl collegc, and if tllc'g 1111, tl~cy go ~vitll i~nd far-riifilited nou ugh to 111,ovidc arj- n purrlosc. They wo~,lc. They Lak~ prentice opportunities. You ought to important pleces ond fc(?l the resllnnbc thankful that your lot has fallen sil~ilities of lifc. Thvy are usu:~lly lic-re under such Icading officials as jiootl fortune and good judgment has worthy citizens. Sons of ~'orliingiiic'n-these are sons brought to the Frisco. If you do your p:rrt you will sonica day see and understand this if. lbrrl~al)s, you [lo no1 unof tlie class that has m:ttln this glorious country, thc class that 11~s clonc nn~i will (lo the hig clcctls of thc wr~~.lil, ~lt%~xt:rnrl :~III~ icp1,rcci:ttc it :~lrcn~ly. b'or!.our. own s;llicms allel for t11,. s t i s t i o ~ I it ill I L I inll~iorc j.uu tr~ m:~l~(! ;I 5011 of your side, (11' this l!:t~,g;tin, Yo11 :11,(! r~vc>lvir~g :L liht.~.al cduc:rtii~ll, sucl~ ns rlo school or cullegc ccnn ~ivc' yo1.1, :111(l al'c not only paid for g-etting it, but arc bcinfi provirlcd for in this orgkrniz;l.tion whilr obtaining it and i~ftci, it is att>~iucd. r 7 lhc slang yhmsc, "go to it," is thr. \\-ot,d for ~.OLI. 'L'hcn ~~cnirml~cr w1i:rt l*'~xnlclin s;~icl, "Plo~gh deep wliilc sing:-s:ir.ds sleel,," and thc imniortai words of 1,ongTellow: "The heights by great mcn rcachrtl and liel~t, Were not attained by sudden flight; But they, while their companions slept. Were toiling upwards in the night." Franklin was the son of a poor man. Hc learned the printer's trade and in a long life of extraordinary usefulness he proved the wisdom of another of his undying lines, "IIe that hath a t~dc. hath an estatc,." Bear this in Inin(l when by mere temporary increasc of w-ages you mas be tempted to quit for a better paying joh before your allprenticeship is completed. Speaking of sons, lets LIS consid~,r three kinds of sons. Sons of Rich Men-Thcsc have sct~ool advantages, also college and automobiles, boats, with lots of time to use them. Do not envy these. With al- thc c1:rss t11:rl 1r1:11<c,s vvc*rytliin~- WI. II<.L.~, the class Ll~itt III:I~<~*S t111. ~~~ssit~l~. grt~itc~st of all tl168 f;~(:ilitir,s \\c r~c.c%11- - t~.:~nsl~ort:rlio~~, 'Yllis is 1111; cl:~ss Lli;~ t kl~ows 1111: l~cst hal~]ri~~c%s uf 1il.e ~rie;~au~.~, of doing, ar~cl rloi~~g wc.11, ;) ncccsaary picuo of \vo~,lc fur the \\(,I-

25 THE PRISCO-MAN 23 lo build 111) the organization wilh skilled thinking wot~lcmcn, who rccognize their oblig-;ltions to their fellowworkn~en. their rmplnycrs, lhc world and Lhemselves. I may be talking lo the futu~~ president of this road or of thc Unitctl States. Some one has said that of tho forty-seven railroads having off~ces in Sew Yorlrlc City, forty-six hnvc Iirexidents who have, rlsen from the ranks. These men by reason of their lcnowldgc, ability and forcefulness, havc risen to the leadership of vast propertics. It is, therefore, stated that any ~niployc of a large organization may 1)ccomc its oliicial head. It is also snicl to br possible for any nalive-born citiz1.n of the LJnited States to become 11rcsident of the nation. This possibilily for advnncement in a country devoid of hereditary class distinction Is 1,otll a blessin= and a menace. It is a blessing us a dcrnocratic principle and x menace as a muse of awakening am- 1.1itions unsupported by ability and prc- I~aratorg achicvcmcnt. Men become p1v4dcnts aftcr long preparations as ~~ropressively successful subordinates. They advance hecausc they are good \vorlcmcn or the); do not advance at all. If we make it our business to be good workmen and find and fill the place for which we are. fitted, we shall have no complaint to make of an ungrateful \vor1<1. It is unfortunate, that anyone is saying lliat apl~rcnticcship is necessary in ordcv to sul~ply fo~,men, supcrintwdcnls anrl Iiigl~c~. oliicinls. Considrr(d t'ro111 Llic s1111d11~int of IIUIII~JL'I~S ;I~vII<.. ll~is is :I mislolie. J<c.~ncmbct1r:~t ll~c I~csl l~ossi)~lc ollicers can do littlc n8ill1 ~nr~llilurlfo of incompetent nrol.l<tncn. 1-<1? I : good workman and. Ict the Icadership oornr? lo Ihosc who can romm:~ntl it.

26 THE FRIS(30-MAN irpl~rcnlicesliip ha8 been worked Out shop is a wide-open book for you to into a fine morlcing scheme. It is be- read if you will. Are your eyes open yond the espcrimcntal stage, but has not yet reachcd the point of such gento the fact that your days and Frisco wtiys are dlfferent'? eral application as its tundamental What is this road doing for you:' It merits dcserve. Your ofliccrs hare undertaken a great responsibility in this is raising you out of the nine-dollar-aweek class that changes jobs on an coursc. Not only hzve they built up average every four months the country the course but liarc carried it on for over. It gives you a tradc which is a years. They, necd your enthusiasm to fortune. A trade is better than a forencourage tlicm. They necd to know tune; it is the means of your becoming of pour appfecintion and your realiza- a man; antl this no fortune could nction of the great opllol~tunitics offered complish. IIrhat docs the road ask uf you wliicll n1.e not arailul~lc to hoyr you-simply that you do youi, work, [lo 111 many shops ant1 n-crc not ;~vailablc it once, do it so that it will stay done. in any shop in the country until a rc- Every railroad studies maohincry, crnt d;~tc. Thcse oricc.rs will go as far materials antl methods. This road does as thc success of tlic plan justifies this and it also studics men. Jlaterials them. As you show your appreciation and machinery cost money. No wise by your work, revealing your desire to man v-:isles them willingly, hut wc improve yourselves, so mill they show have wen many people wastc their thcmselvcs ready to meet that desire lives. Apprenticeship is an efcort to by evcry posslble improvement in the stop this wastc. Think of this carc- 11lan. fully and figure out what it means to You ;ire not blind. You arc not fools. you. Think out why thcsc orrcials arc \.ou sce tlic depth and the hrcadth of Illis :~.l)l~~~cnticeship. You undel'stirncl that it in of a new kind, better than ;iny cver offered anywhere in the world 1)cforc. T shall never forget one of my days in the shop when a group of men spendlny all this timc and money and worry ul)on you. It is said to be a rulc in human experiencc that the morc is done for any man the less is the appreciation, Prove now that in your case this is not true. According to J-our talents and your waitcd on my foreman to thrash him opportunities you will be measured. tor showing me how to set valves. In The world has a right to expect much thosc days the slcilled workman selfrom you. It does espect it and much is due from you. You are bound to tho fishly tried to keep to themselves the obligatlon to become a Good American secrets and mystcrien of thc trades. Workman of the Frisco kind. One who 'r11ry mrcclc it Ii:~rtl for a 1)oy to learn. will feel that good work alonc is noble. I,r11. lir,~c tlic lrcst l~nowlcdge of thc Bops, go to it! At Birmingham Some idea of the repair work done in the Birmingham, Ala., shops may be gained from the reproduction herewith showing a coal car being reconstructed. The car men at Birmingham are very proud of their advance from a running repair shop to a heavy repair shop nncl of the many improvements obtainecl through the efforts of Master Mechanic 11011aker. J. H. Brown, h~ntl air Inon, is s11on.n in the I'oreground.

27 THE FRISCO-MAN --.. On the Pmcil Many unique schemes have been put into effect by the Central Safety Committee in its endeavor to keep the Safety First idea constantly before the attention of Frisco men. Its latest step in this direction was to have the words "Safety First" stamped on all lead pencils now being distributed among employes. Helen of Newburg In reproducing photographs oc fhe little folks recently received, TI~I: FRISCO-AIas could not overlook Miss Helen Coffman, daughter of Division Four Trains TIIE FILISCO-~\~AS is indebted to Mr. T. C. Phillips, editor Hardy (Ark.) Iierald, for the photograph heretith reproduced, showing passenger train Foreman C. F. Coffinan of Neaburg, Mo. The reproductioii herewith is from a post card photo take11 of Miss Helen while she was on an outing with her mother and friends Juue 3. Lineman John Workman of Wichita, Kans., goes fishiug. In the habit of KO. 104 rounding the curve just. one mile north of Hardy, Ark. The picture was made by Mr. Philllps on last Easter Day. Iv crawling poles, he goes up a fishpole for his first fish at Leon, Kans. J

28 20 THE PRISCO-MAN Pocahontas Force 'I'hr five employes who malrr 1111 the station force at I'oc;lhontas, Ark. are all members of the same fraternal order (31. W. of A) and three of thern are rankiug officers of same. :I \vi'p~:i< : IIII~ c,vc!ry I~atl \vrec:lc c:auscs nrlnlcwrls ii~rostigntions :~utl reports, oftell resulling in orders by commissions or legislation. The greatcst ~~urnbel' ol' 1)assengcrs ever Itilleil in a singlc year fronl all causes mas in 1907, when they numbered 610, and even in Mat year the number of trespassers killed-5,612-was over nine times as great as the number of passengers Icilled , the last year for which we have complete statistics, the ~iu~nbcr of passengers killed mas only 356 and the number of trespassers IiillrcI 3,284, or fifteeu times as great,, And yct newspapers agitntc?, cornmissions issue orders and lawnlalters legislate to reduce accidents to passengers, and almost no one in a position of p~~blic authorily does anything to reduce the slaughter of trespassers.-from all article ent,itled, "\Vhy 5,000 'I'rcspassers Are Killed Yearly.-llailway Age Gazette, December U. S. Statistics. In the picture heren ith reproduced way be seen 0. Keith, agent and ol~erator; H. Stephens, cashier ant1 operator; L. D. Robcrts, clerk;.i. C Edwards, warehouse mall, and.i Lindsey, clerk. Accidents to Trespassers Fourteen ~leoyle mere killed yesterday while trespassing; fourteen n-ill be killed today; fourteen will be killed tomorrow-if the record of recent years is being and shall be maintained. It is not often that as many as fourteen passengers are killed in E.f.*+*+.E.E+.I-l..~-l.b.++.f "IVith the watchful eyes of $ $ (housands of careful railroad em- + $ ployes, trained to detect physical $ 2 a11c1 mental deficiencies in the 2 4 world ol transportation, to ap- 4 $ ply necessary remedies rather 4 $ than explain disastrous results, $ $ to save to society the lives an? 3 + facilities of the most prec,ious heritage that the nation pos- + $ sesses, this should be a most 3 3 full and suricient answer to the + 4 question, ''Why Safety First?"- $ Charles \\'are, G.,\I., Union Pa- 4 $ cific Itailroad-Railway Record $ Aug. 30, is E.E.M.*+.f-EE+.f +++++*+++++

29 THE PRISCO-MAN Frisco Family wllen I\-c (lo this \yo \\ill bc a. grcal: I.:. If. SIII I'll. ~ ~ I I I I I ~ I I C I:(. ~ ~,F(.,111. I ~. 1<:1115. a appy I':tniily. IVho wc are nntl w11y. Iron. bvst cxrl \ye IJC SIICII 21 t"l~l~ily? JIy idca is, in the first place, we ICveryone \vorking for the conlpany, should look upon our fellow-employes frc;nl llie resident down, is a part of as our brother and treat him as such. this great family. Each of us in our Let us each be our brother's keeper; respective positious ;~rc necessary to that is, if we find anything that is conz~~lete the fanlily, and each one of likely to ctluse iujury or misfortune to us sllonld share in it, as far as our him, let us lend a helping hand to reearning capacity goes, Tor one can't lnove the same, and, if be make any qclt along without the other. error, let us in n bortherly way remind hiul of it and try to help him up instead of piling down npon him. Let us rrlnember that while we are doing these things fo~' others, therc are hundreds doing the very same 1 take it that we become lnenibers of this family of our own accord, sim~rly tl~rough ol~r c:u'ninji power and ltintl of \vork. \\'ere it not for our wages, not nlany of us would be in the service-we \voultl be following sonic other occupation. Let me say here that I belicve in unionism so far as wage matters go and no La~tller, and when that is settled it is up to me to be ready and willing to perforln an honest day's work for the wages so settled upon me, and I am to take as inucll i~lterest in furthering the prosperity of this fanlily as I sl~oulcl were I employed by anyollc else. I~urtl~ermore, we sl~oultl pert'ol'n~ the (aslts set out lor us cheerfully without my hesitancy and with the sole aim to do our work well, feeling that the \vuy we succeed will be felt all the way 1111 the ladder. R conductor cannot succeed unless he has the support of his brakeman. So more can a chief dispatcher or assist:int superintendent williout the support of the conductors and others below them, and so on up to the president. 1 take it that the success and Imppiness of this l'lanily depends on each oi 11s doing our work well, as c?:lch of us is dcpenrlcnt upon the other, and thing for us. And while we do this, we are doing no more than we get our pay for, and we will not only get the approval of our immediate supcriors, but the whole family will rejoice with us and each will receive his just merits for his worli. It is not the lofty things that count the most, but the plain everyday things. I call to mind n few lines to illustrate: T,:vc~~,y d;~y in cvclry ycal,, 'I'hc caminon things arc thosc most tlvar; 'l'htt ail. wc I~i,culhe, the gooil 1)l:lirr I~rcail, 'I'l~c slr>vl) wc' sc,c,lc c':ic.li night in bcvi; Go ~ 1 1 yo11 ~ 1 will, ~ go east or wrst. J. J. K~iowles, foreman, Section 24%, Pirtle, Okla., and gang.

30

31 -..- THE FRISCO-MAN railroads fluctuate in value just as the thermometer goes up or down. They cost for. construction, but their value exists chiefly in the summer time. Note this variation from all the above. The cost of a railroad between two great cities is less if it can make LL bec-linc or avoid tunnels; hut the icss it costs and thc shorter thc dist~incc it runs, the greater is its value. These illustrations give an idea of what a taslc is "intangible" vtlluation. Wh% shall decide whcthcr Iowa milroads have gone clown in value and how much by the drcline in gopu1:rtion In thc last decadc? ;\Tichigirn railroads wcre stated by Michigan ofticials to have $35,814,043 worth of this foggy something belonging' to them in 1900; but Wisconsin on thc other hand cre'dits no intangible value at all to its railroads. The Statc of Washington credited the xorthern Pacific with 1 per cent intangible value abovc cost of reproduction of the railroad, but h'cw Jcrscy adds 20 pcr cent or $75,841,600 and then deducts 20 per cent for depreciation (which is an absolutely unhaltablc process) and so there you are; the value of New Jersey railronds is just what it cost to bring them into existence. Minnesota sees no "intangible" valucs; neither did Massachusetts when it was trying to get at the value of the New Haven road. Xow let us see how the con~plications multiply beyona all thc abovc. 'I'i~c value at which a railruad shoulcl be marked if in tho 1n:~rkct for purchase is its earning powcr; just as the value of a horse lies in wl~;rt it can rum and not in the direction it may Dr headed. But two lincs of crlual cost noulcl nut ncccssarily have equal value, for an old "going" line has more ralue fh:rn a ncn- onc just clcvcloliing its tvr- ~,ito~'y. 'J'lle~~ intu the 11uzzlc cull~cs tllc \-:~luc uf strategic position, for inst:.rncc, Ihc strctch of rails bctwcrn tho 1Iarlcm Ill'iAge ;~nd Lllc Gr;cntl Cenlr:~l lk[~r~t, rlvc.1- wliicl~ tl~c Ncw 11:lr?1i IIILIS~ IWSS. 'I'hc pritsilvg:'c of ~mshing over tl~is strategic stretch is figure3 away up in the millions. Piling a littlc more on the problem: The depreciation cluestion has the railroads themselves in doubt, and how can a remote commission dccide this for 40 per cent of all thc railroad trackage of the world? Some railroads wear out quicker than others. Ties are always decaying. Kansas ties are only valucd at 56 per cent of their cost. The Tar-South tie in its moisturc will not live as long as tl~c Arizona tic in its dryncss, but on thc othcr hand. Southern trnciis will not havc to be constantly moved or liflctl to keep uy with encroaching sands. Kvery mortal drvicc grows old; some things on a railroad age out and some wenr out, but when, thcy are uut thcy arc out and unless replaced there is no railroad. Depreciation must cverlastingly be emphasized, for it is the one factor that is always activc; and elticiencs consists in supplying material for it to gnaw away, but whether it is 20 per cent or 10 per cent or 5 per cent it is only possible to tcl1 after replacement; for onc ycals may wear hard and another lightly; for instance, the Baltimore and Ohio had $4,000,000 worth of equipment loss in thc ffoods of last spring. DiIFerenees In Coustruetion. Sow going one step farthcr backto construction. It is self-evident that such a road as the Union I'acific, fro~rt Omaha wcstwarcl across Kcbraslia, was little rnorc than a matter of laying tics un a gradual rise; but thc way across the Sierra Mountains in California was onc to tcst men's every device and capacity. A11 thcsc differences this great taslc involves..2 thousand o~,ler complications.:auld be ranged in rows and then not exhaust the list. Eut passing back to the very first ilcm in railroad buildins---the right of way-it must l~e 1,e:llizecl that in rll:lny cases tile righi ~i lvay acreage custs 11vu and onr,- fourth to two and onc-hall times ah much as Ihc vuiuc of tl~e Ixnd it I I I I C S Hut to dul~licxlc now :~t (n'o :~n,i onc,-l'uullli 1inic.s pl,csctlt \.;I~III,\,v0111~1 it,: y~wl~il,itivc, arltl yet sucil pos-

32 3 0 THE FRISCO-MAN sillililies of ~~c~l)~.orluclioi~ liavc to bc Safety Lock ~,cl)orted on; wliicli is ~,cl~ortirig on something 1,111~:ly irnaginativc and C. R. Collins, agent, Bentley, Kans., quite usclt~ss esccpt for 1ccIinic;~l nrgw has invented the Collins' Safety Lock went anti incrcwsing tcc:hnicxl crnploy- Tor platform trucks. n~ent. This loclc works auton~atically. The last question should rcnlly bc first: What is this valuation for? It When the tongue of the truck is up is to find a supposrd scientific basis for railroad rates-both p:lsscng,rr ;in11 freight. This cannot I>(. clone l~y thc means pro~~oscd, Lor this conl~~;~tlicli~~~~ is visible-if a ~~assvnger rate is ri~htly low in n c~~owtlc~l 1c.1~i111ry n.1-1ci.c prosper it^, flourishes, then a rate. ought to b(! lliclr \vhcl,c 111c ptrl~lllalion is sparsc ;~nd pool. ancl jou~mc~ys necessarily long. Yrt from the poc1;t.tboolr point of view thc rrnwdcd rc%- xion could stand high ~.aics l)clt(.~. than Ihc thin region. Atlanta Veterans The interior of the Frisco's off~ce at Atlanta, Kans., is shown in tlie accompanying reproduction. To tlie right may be seen Agent S. E. Jones, who has been employed in the station department of the Frisco on the Kansas and Western Divisions for (lie spring forces the shaft betwcr~~ fl~e spoltes of the wheel, maltiug it i~~i~iiovable, but wlle~i the tonyuc is lo\vered to nlovc the truck the shaft is withdrawn, allowing the wheel to trlrn. Whistle-Just Whistle \\:II~II yr;ur liearl is sntl and the* world is glu~ii, \\;histlo-thilt's ;d-ji~st whistlc! l'rclcntl you'rc :i fil'ct Ilioufili you I~ave no dru~il- I v l i s I i l s I j11sl \vliislle.

33 -- THE FRISCO-MAN - 31 I Women's Department MRS. E. 0. ArEIVLAND. \'e have i~ book writtell by T. S. Arthur, entitled, "What Can IVoman Ijo?" It is the story of the influence of two women from babyhood to grarlcl~notlierl~ood, onc for good, tile other for cvil. Both were wives ant1 ~notliers. Onc was the means of 1)renlting up her home, thc other saved h(~r husband from ruin. In history me find recordcd tlic Iremc?ndous iiilluenoe of \vonlun in 11:~tiollal affairs, as well as in the home. The Iialnes of Elizabeth, Jo:~n of Arc, Nancy J-Ianlis Jhcoln and many others are I~ousehold words, as are Cleopatra, Bloody Mary and Lucretia Borgia. Many of our great men have attributed their success to some woman and some have said, "All I am I owe to my mother," wife or sister. Too many women do not realize their possibilities. No matter ho~v hctljietl about yow life may be, there is ;~l\v:~ys so~nctliing you can do and if you do one thing well, it is betle~' than to so scatter your energies that lhry do not amount to anytliiiig anywhere. Jf y r ~ have children, you have n life-work. If you never do anything else, you can educate the children as far as you are able, and instill in their minds while they are young, the desire to be and do something worth while. You can begin their education while they are still clinging to your dress, with the beautiful stories which 1 I Auxusta, Kansas, Editor have bee~~ llalidecl down to us and of which the chilclrcn never tire. You can educate them in right living by keeping the atmosphere of the home pure and cleaii. I)o you know that everyone has an atmosphere'? I have met people wl~ose very presence breathed wliolesonlc s\veetness and \vho seemed like the "shadow of a rock in. a. weary land." There was a mngic something in the personality that soot.hed the turbulent spirit ant1 restctl the tired nerves. These are the people who have realized the depth and fullness of life, who have suffered and fought,-and conquered. They have come to know the truth of Anna Robertson Brown's essay, "IVhat is Worth While," in which she says: "The Eternal Life is serene. It is not careworn, nor knows it any foreboding of future ill. Can we not take to ourselves its large spirit of serenity and c,heer'? \Ve may let go discontent. In all the eternal ye:lrs there is no word of murmur from ally restless heart. In its vast silences how trivial would sound the coni~)lainings of our harassed days!" I am speaking ~iov to all the Frisco women. No two of us are just alike. No two of us have the same ambitions, the same ideas of pleasure or of what is worth while. Rut I do not doubt me can all make onr lives count for more than they now do. To those of 11s who have always been "dreamers of dreauis," I would say, do 11ot give

34 :! 2 THE PRISCO-MAN - 111)!,our dreams, I)uf. DNI. tha~n into action alld make them come true. It may seem ;I long hilrd road and the difticulties be almost insurmountable, hut hold on and work and hope and there can be but one outcome. 110 not be discouraged because of the circumstances surrounding you. It may seem impossible to realize your ambitions in your present environment, but Carlyle says, "The situation that has not its duty, its ideal, was never yet 0ccLIl~ied by Inan. yes, here, in this poor miserable, han~pered, despicable act~~al, wherein thou even now stnndest. here or nowhere is they ideal: work it out tlkerefro~n, and vorking believe, live, be free. Fool! the ideal is in thyself, the impediment, too, is ill thyself; thy condition is but the stuff thou art to shape that same ideal cut of, what matters it whether such stuff be of this sort or that, so thc for111 thou give it be heroic, be poetic? 0 thou that pinest in the irnprisonn:ent of the actual and criest bitterly to the gods for a kingdom wherein to rule and create, know this of a truth: the. thins thou seeltest is already wilhin Lhee, here or nowhere, couldst thou only see." I know whereof I speak, for in my own life I have proved true these things. To those women, if there be any in the Frisco family, whose eyes are, figuratively speaking, always fixed upon the ground, I would say, "Look up!" There is always God's blue Sky above you, His sunshine surrounding you and the moon and the stars to lift the heart alld the mind from the sordid cares of life. If yon do not care for books-the best books-cultivate a taste for them and you will be surprised at the unguessed pleasures life holds. Sometimes I get up in the morning and my heart fairly sinks in- Sap111 jxi, Olild., Sept. 20, 'I::. To the Chairman of Cenlr:ll Safety Committee: There is nothing in print pertaining to publlc utilities that appeals so forcibly to the employer and employe as "Safety First." It brings to the employer higher dividends on the investment and better salaries to the employes also causes less hcartaches in the home and happiness :wound our fireside. AlISS ALYCE RORERTSON, Daughter of Engr. J. F. 12obertson, Red River Division. to my shoes when I think of the hard day's work ahead of me. But I take five minutes' the, slt down and read an especially fascinating chapter from "The Tale of Two Cities," or "Les AIisernbles," or a favorite poem from Browning or Riley. Then while my hands are doing the tasks I so much dreaded, my mind is "far afield" and the day is a red letter day, for it has been spent with the master minds of thz world. I hare spoken of tne person whose atmosphere was a blessing to all those who come within its radius. There are also people wlio are s~~rrounded by a deadly miasma. It chokes all the good impulses and makes us wish to get as far from them as possible. They are fond of repeating malicious gossip and shady stories and life and love and all the things me had thought -

35 so beautiful assume a vulgar, depressing and sordid aspect. What is your atmosphere? Let us determine to make it one of purity and strength. Let us get a broader outlook and realize more fully that, "No one liveth to himself," but that we have a power for good or evil and an influence the bounds of which we cannot guess. To some of us the Safety First idea does not seem of much importance, or seems unreal or far away, and not a vital part of our lives. But let us hold it off and look at it fairly and realize that we are a cog in the machinery and that only through the perfect working of every part can we obtain a perfect whole. We can all do something and by our thought for our loved ones and those of our sisters in this big Frisco family, our own lives will be sweeter and our outlook broader. THE FRISCO-MAN 33 Itnow what you mean when you say Safety First. If you are not doing anything-get busy, so you will have something to write. I appreciate the interest already manifested in the new department, which has been shown by the articles cor tributed and the cordial letters re ceived from the contributors. I am especially glad of the pictures, which add so much to the attractiveness of the department and hope wc may 1,ave a few every month. Our cosy corner is nicely launched now and I trust every Frisco woman will rally to our standard-safety FIRSTand aid in making it a success. Mrs. E. G. Newland, editor of the Women's Department, who attended the meeting of the Kansas Division Safety Committee, at Neodesha, Kans., October 3, has the following to say regarding the meeting: I wish it was possible ior every cmploye and crcry Frisco woman to hc I would like to have letters froin the women telling how they are aiding Safety First. Some of the ways present at a mccting of this kind. I may be new to other women, and we :tm positive it would arouse your CIIthusinsm to such an extent that woncan help each other in this way. Do derful impctus would be given tllc you talk of the movement in your Safety First causc. home, and keep posted on the pros- The mecting was callcd at ~1c1'c.n ress we are making? I will ende,~vor o'cloclt, with Supcrintcndcnt I3row1i. chairman, occupying thc chair. to tell you each month something that We listened to the rrrord rnadc in has been done since the last issue of t11c rcductio~~ of personal injuries dur- 'l'lr~: Firrsw-Hiv, and it will help us in our efforts if we know what someing tllc Lhr~e months ending.\rlg'~cr;t 31, 1913, as compared wit11 thc VOI.- responding months in 1!1 12. This o:~.. one else has done. I have given you decidedly encouraging as thc gain nn this month a report from the Kansas the various divisions ranged all thc Division, of the committee and its way from seven to fifty-eight I)er writ: work. :I total decrcasc in 1)ersons ltillcd of thirty-thrcc pcr ccnt and injrcl,crl Do you explain Safety Flrst to your thirty -scvcn pcr cent. neighbors, who are not railroad peo- The merits of the dt?irctivc car card ple and thus aid in educating the were discussed and plans made for a traveling public? If you hare nex er morc thorouyh checlting system..\ llttlc after Ln.elve o'clock t11c done so, just try it and see hen. many 11ccr.tin~ \ras arljo~~r~~cd for lunch..\i 1)crpl~ J 011 n ill find \vho n ill IICI~ ('1 PII I I I I I I S S I S r '1'11~

36 THE FRISCO-MAN. - report of personal injurics for the month was road antl discussed, thc cause of cacli injury bring (lctcrrnincmd and a rclnedy xuggcst~cl. Tn several cases thc sole causc was carclcsslless on the ga~,t of thc pc!.sun injurc(1. Tllc ol~ly remedy for c;~~'clcssncss is bt1uc:rtiun in Snfcty First. \\re are giving thls educalion lo thc em~~loycs all thc time, but thc public is harder to reach. Tn onc injury rcport a man had fallen into a cinder ltit at night and rcccivetl n few bruises and scratches. The cnmmittc~c: \\-;is somrwhut at :I loss to find n remedy for this condition. Sufixeslions wcrc tiniillp off(-red Illat liic cin 11c.r pit 111, ~-c.clnirc,d to fl;!:. ol, 1,1?? r,st:rl)lish yal,tl lin~its. the other clivisions (lo some mighty Ilard work, if they ltrcp thc Kanrws 1)ivision from winning tlic ncst prize. Tt was a plensurc to shultc hxr~ls with these men and the report ot lhelr month's work was an ins1)irnlion lo mc. Tt certainly is a wol,lr worth u'hilc to further a cause that protect? the lives and makcs more secure the hapl~inews in tho homes of surh nlcn as these. It was a plcasure to spend a fcw huu!..s with our Ccntrcil Comrnitlr~c (!hnirnlnn..\i]-. W. IJ. spa old in^. llis tlnf:.rilin~ courtcsy antl tact rnalic~s 11in1 an itlexl prtl,son fol. this olticc. IIe gav~ ;I vcml.y inle~esting talk congrat~~l~~linc thc comlnittcc on tlleir past mol~lh's WIII.~~ ;!n(l prctlictc.(l grcatcl succ:css l.rrl. tl1c ful~il~c. My falher is scction forclnan :~t.\yles~vort, Okla., so I thought I would writc a lcttcr about Safety First. I am so glad the wo~ncn have n coimcr in THE FRISCO-NAN, and 1 want Lo thank the editor for his kindncss. I,pt us not s ~ t still and find fnult \villi thc raill,oatls, but use our comman sc%nsc. Some of us would bc n long :'ur:ly from homi: if 1Iic1.c wel,c no ~,;~ilrontls. PC) 1rt 11s hnvc plenty of Lhct~n 11nd good on's, and m;ly lhcy :ill IN= S;11'(~ly First ~-o:~cls. OZlSI.: ;\IOlJl.OCli. Back From Utah To the right in the accompanying reproduction is D. P. Harbin, paint foreman, Birminghnm, Ah. Mr. Harbin has just returned from a trip io Salt Lake City, where he examined the Merman Temple, and is entertaining his friends with some interesting

37 Along the Line The marriage of I:. \.J. 'l'r;ilip, t11i1.d ti.lclc operator, :rl~(l A11cs \\;il.'un Clark 111. l"u1.1 Sr11iLl1,.\~,li,, L I I I ) ~ ~ ~~lxcc I,(- ~.cntly. 1'111' rnl1t.v iillicc firrcc rstencl corlgratul;~ti(~ns,111il best wi~hcs. W..I. Moorc is appointed gcne~,;ll agent 'I'ulsa, Oliln., succcctling \V. 13. ('rnig, who 1,esignetl some tirnc ago ~ I I ;icce~~t position with the S:lnd S111.ingh K:lilw:~y. ;\I. \\'. ltic1i;lrdson. former agent ;it.\ltu,s. Olil;~., is :r[i~~c~intcd agent ;ti Snllull!;~. Operator AIilicr, who is transierrcd to Scmligman, is succecclrd by 011c1,;rtor 1:oscbcrry. Opct~ator IVIlnlcy of Clics- Lcr' succeeds I:oscbci.~~y. Mrs. L. l?;~ndolllh has ncccptcil position as stcnogrnpher in supcrintt'ndcnt's omce. Our. nc\v desk II,~:, a~.ri\,c~l :r11(1 \vill 11c put into IISV ill~l~~c,~iintcly. Cherryvale Car l~ccords show that, dul,ing thc month of Sel~ten~hcl., 223 foreign c:~rs. 140 sys1r.m ~.;ILS and 1L lxrssengcr cars v'el'c rrl~aired :rt thi.s ~roint. Inspc.cto~, ('orun~ is Ii1.11t on th,, I.LI~I ihcsc tl:~ys Ilrrntin# foul., g~.:~in nncl ccnlvnt (.;II.s 1'111. usc ;~t('ll(~1~1~yvalc ant1 (IIII<,I. lroi~its, Southwestern Division Francis

38 point to enter the service of the Rock Island at El Reno, Okla. iwr. Balley is an "old tlmer" among us and the news of his resignation was received with much regret. He carries our hest wishes for success in his new field. Victor L. JIelvin, who for some time scrvcd as N. & I. clerk, but who resigned rccently to enter the service of tho Katy at Denison. Texas, has returned to Francis. Mr. XIelvin is appointed division accountant succeeding Mr. J. L. Bailey. Birmingham JII Llic last fcw months the car de- ~,a~,tn~cnt nt flirmingl~am has advanccd fvon~ a running repair shop to a heavy rr3pair shop, having rcbuilt about sixty flat botlom coal cars and somc ten or twelve undcrframcs. A telephone has becn installed in thc ofllce of general car foreman. Jessc Baker, car clcrk, mas first to use thc phone. IV. T. Wllsoti, chief joint inspector, has just returned from Dunlop, Tenn.. where hc accompanied thc remains of his fathcr-in-law, 311'. 31. E. I"arlner, who died Septembcr 20. Mr. Farmcr was formerly employed as inspector for tlic Frisco at this point. The family hnre thc sympathy of all the car men. Mrs. Oscar Xartin. wifc of car foreman at Enst Tl~omas, is visiting fricnds n11d rclativcs at Colunibus, Ga. Joe I-liggins, rip track furemi~n, is :[gain al)lc to i,esumc dutirs after an illness oc Lwo InOnths. 1':arl Sugg resigned as ti~rieliecl~c~. at this point Lo acc,ept position in At- 1;lnLa. Ga. Jimmie Rux has rcturned from an rstcncled honpymoon trip to Sew Yol.1~ ('ity, BufCalo, Washington and otllcr points in thc East. \V. R. Smith, car man, atinouliccs tile ai,rirnl of o baby girl at his hon~c. W. R. is slowly rccovrring. Safe "Travel on:?' Not actual money, of course, but accepted like money in every part of the civilized world. You avoid risk of loss when you travel with these cheques. They are useless without your signature, which identifies you to the people you have to deal witb Hotels, railways, steamship lines and the best shops in every country know they are as good as actual money. Each cheque is engraved with its exact value in foreign currency. "A. B. A!' Cheques Get them at your bank. If your bank in not' yet sugelied wlth them, wrlte for booklet and Informellon as to where they can be obtained In your viclnlty. BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, New York Cih cation spent in St. Louis, Kansas City, Denver, Salt Lake City and Ogden. He reports a fine time. Kansas Division J. N. Fountain and crcw have just conil~lcted the pile driving work on tlic Kansas Division. 11. N. Searcy, with his bridge gang, is renewing bridge I. A. Finltenbinder, with his gang, has just about completed the work of taking out the old buildings on Sixth Street, Joplin, 310. J. TI*. Waterbury and his concrete gang are excavating for the improvcment worlt in the Sixth Street yard, Joplin, No. The foundation for the new section house at I-Iallomell is being put In by.i. hiictdleton and his gang. This is a tnucli nredrd improl'ixnrnt ns thr src-

39

40 3 8 THE PRISCO-MAN STIFEL'S Standard "IT'S THE CLOTH IN YOUR OVERALLS THAT GlVES THE WEAR" Overalls, Uniforms, Coats, Shirts and Jumpers made of this cloth give maximum wear. If you want the best, look for the name on the inside of the cloth. A Guaranteed not to break in the print and to retain the true blue indigo,= color. Continuously on thc market for nmre than 75 years. INSIST upon it from your dealer. CLOTH W 4NUFACTUREI) IIY J. L. SONS INDIGO IWL~RS ANN PRIN I EHS WHEELING, W. VA. SA1.W OFFICES NEW YORR CHICAGO S4N FN4NCISCO '1 ORON'I Church St. 223 W. Jachson Ultd. Postal l'eleflraph Bid$. IJ Menchester Rldfi. Beaumont Junction gine is just ~cccntly out of thc Enid shol)s 1Villixm.\llcrr,.s(,ction forcman, has just ~IIII~C~I:ISC!~ gilsolinc car fov Lh(1 Ilurlrosc of insl,<.<.ling his tl,a<,lt. Ilr c!sl~ccls to have it in sorvicc Lhc curly part of Octobcr. (;. 1). Scl~oolc~r, car ~,~vl);ii~,<,r, 11x3 I,<,- turned from n trill Lo l:o~~ndui~, 31ont.. nhcru he spent lhrec wr~clts mill1 relat i~lcri.. William 13cers is assigned ~osilion on thc con.: ctlut(~s. 'clay work J. J. h-orwood has charge at niyhts. Ihginccr 1Villinrn Kenncvly h;~s engine los, (r:tin GOY and GO9. The en- George NcXlurg, car carpenter, has ~)~~rc:hnsccl a new bufi-qy and says IIC is going to scc some of Lhc outsiclc worlil.

41 .\cc.ount of the new and 1ic;rrier vngincs coming tu this division, Mr. Jake I::~lcc.<tra\v, scctiun foreman, with his mrn li;l\-c been busy "ticing uu" all llic hi,le lraclcs..\i. Gcislcr, :~ssist;int superinlenclonl locornulivc fuel service, ilntl Jhstcr.\lrchrlnic.\lr~.\rtlirrr urcrc :~niong llle I.CYL.II~ visilo~.s :tt this point. I'xssvngcr Conductor B. S. Si~il'li an11 \\-if<> 11:tvc just returned from a t\vv ~nonlllir' trip lhrough Lhe east ;inti (':rnatia. "Ecncr" reports a. bully trill. Ozark Division Red River Division 'l'hc, J,y~.ic 'I'licati~c:, S;ll~uli~;c, 01cl:l.. is xivin; a st~ow for the 1)cncllt uf Lhc I.:ldic.r'.\usilial,y 01 Lllc 13, of LA. V. LC 1.:. Tnins 10:: :lnd 104 oc Lhe will on^ S1.1.in-s Sub-division arc cloin~ finc \\-it11 lhc 1;~r~vl. power. Ilnylnt-rr C. P. Jacobs xnd family IIILVC just relurn(d fron~ an extended v:~v;~liull in lhc west nnd report s finc tlnlc. ('hrcnce \\-:crr'chn, m:lc?iiinisl at S;I- 11n111:1, Olcla., is l:~lci~~g in tlic '41'r1ests of J'allas" 11aradc :it 1i;~ns:rs City. 'I'hc m:~~.ringc of l~ircman R. G. ~li:~nil~r~~l;rin i~nd hiiss ICLhel Gnmcl took place :tt 'I'haycr, JIo., October 5. Thr rn:iny friends of thc young oolll?le \vish llifivu :I, sniooth sail on' the mil11.inioninl sen. ms '. Ilo\vard, wife of mcc1i:rnk;tl nccounlant, is visitinji friends In Sarhrillr, 'l'enn. 1.ogying industries in and around JIarktvl Trw arc increasing. The I'oinselt T.umbcr Company at Trum:in..\rI<.. is doing big bnsincss and iir douhlinn thc cnpacily of tlirir mill. This is lhc Slngcr Sen-in,- 3I:rcahinl< 1,l;int nnd it is very interesting In F(.(, lht?~ii tul'n out line veneer work I'~,carn the old logs. This company nlonc h;lr: 731J 11eOlllc c'nll~loycd at lhrir ~)I:lnl at 'I'i.uman Lint1 is es1)cctctl that 800 B. A. Cealancl is appoinled general I'oreman of the rountihouse at Fort Smith, Ark., succeeding G. C. hug he^, transferred; efcective Septe~uber 1. 11'. I). Armstrong is :~ppointed comnlercial agent, with ofiw at Sew Or- Irans. TA., effective October 1.

42 THE PRISCO-MAN -- No Train 105, rr~nning at twenty miles an I~our, was s~~appecl April 20 just slurnl~ A miin withoul enlhusi~~hln couldn't sell steel saws in a jail. JViien lie loses his enthusiasm hc loses his ~L.II). When his grip is Cone, it's time tcr call thtr undertiliter. "J~:nthusiaam is thc ~~uzzlr th;ct com- 1)catitors can not solve: the s!,irit that can not be beaten any more than you a n pound rubber to a pulp with a piece of picket fence. "A man with enthusiasm ran lay an.itlantic cable, chain n mountain torrent, subjugate the forest and make thc niountains get up and w;rtl~ilc ovcr lo 1\Illilolllet. C T I ' IiI<ICPTrl' 17SE IT "JYith it you will xin; without it you will loolc like a man n-it11 thc mumps on both sides. You can not do things 113' h;~lvcs nowud;~~,s. l-i>r~'re got to 1)11t tho cornl)incil cnral.g3; ngxinst the ]'i':~lc of Lhr load :~nll!cc<.li itn 1)11cliin.q up. "Burn enthusinsrn; it's the. n~iilnizht oil of succcss. \Vithont it J oni lamp's out and you nre in cl:irlrnr2;2;. "l~:nthusi;lsn~ is lhc sluff r~f which success is rnntl~. "..I f~llow wilhout enthu~i;i.~t~t has ahout nr much show ;IS n toothl~.bs man at ;I nul-c~~acltin~-i?~~c~." Van Buren Bridge. one and n half miles north of Jasper..\la., as shown in the accoml~anying rcl)rrtl~~ction. Enthusiasm. In ;L circular issued to all ~nelnbers of the Office Efnciency -\ssocialion, Chairman G. E. \\'hitelam, of the executive comn~ittee, quotes the following upon "Enthusit~sm." This prob ai11)- hits the nail more squ:~rely on the head than any article that ha\ the new street car bridge, \vhich \\.as completed bout a year ago. The picture was taken by Miss A\nna Bell Glenn, who is now operaror at Fayetteville, Ark.

43 THE FRTSCO-MAN 4 1 Allen Shadowed The sill~ouette sketch of J. C. Allen, qer~er;~l price clerk ill office of general storelteeper, Springfield, 310, hrre- - via the AIissouri & Sort11 Arkansas. Stops were made along the line and at each Joplin and Webb City n-ere greatly boosted. Conductor D. Long~vill had charge of the train, which was lulled by ellgine 438. Engineer Phil Conl~oy pulled the train from Joplin to 3Ionrtt and Engineer B. S. Binney took it from there to Seligman. with reproduced, was drawn by A\' Iaore. price clerk in the same office. I*'. 0. hiason, agent. City Boosters Ulmn the arrival of the "Joplin- \\'ebb City Boosters' Special" at Yonett, No...Tulle 11, the accompa!?ying piclure was un;tpped. The train was ~nnde up at Joplin and ran over the Frisco through Xcnett to Srli:ma~~. Mo.. from there over the 3lissouri & Xorth Arlransas down to Ilarrison. Arlc., mti back to Joplin, I Depot at West TII~ :a, Okla.

44 Will You Sell Us Your Sfiare Hours? 58 PER CENT COMMISSION The Mediator. Cleveland, : Ohio :.

45 THE PRISCO-MAN 4 : PYLE-NAT1OhTAL ELECTRIC HEADLIGHTS ARE BEING USED ON OVER 22,000 LOCOMOTIVES ALL OVER THE WORLD road Crossings, Frogs, Swit&~, S *itch Stands, Rail Bracer FLINT Varnish Works Safety First in Riveting Is possible with the BOYER HAMMER when fitted with M. S. Tool Holder or Piston Retaining Wall. FLINT, MICHIGAN >I.\YI I.'.\Cl'l'RI.: A FUIdl. I.IXIC OF 'CHI.: IIIGHICST GR.\DE Varnishes, Enamels, Engine Finishes, Blacks, Colors, Primers, Surfacers, Etc. FOR THE RAILWAY TRADE Chirngo Ollice: Se\v \.orl<: 103; l:i~ll~~r Bldg..-:O L'll~!rci! St. I3ra11rhch crerywhcrc.

46 4 4 - THE FRISCO-MAN Insures more Railroad I~II!'i~js >lore Railroad Yen E~ploys morr Ex-Kailrwid Ion TllilS dsi OTI!EB CORPdSl CHICAGO ~~i,,,.~ lluyt Same..... Lcll 111c Ikow littlc Address ~0111,~ I~I\~II.ILI~(.c costs. Age....O~:~ll,ti in use Rolled from Best Quality Steel THE RAIL JOINT COMPANY ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ > o, A f i ~ CONTISUOUS JOINT WEBER JOINT WOLHAUPTER JOINT Cntalog at Agenclem Indla Bld~. GENERAL OFFICES: Rallway Exchange Bldg. Denver, Colo. Equltable Bldg. Portland. Ore. Wllcox Bldr. 185 MADISON AV.. NEW YORK CITY Plttsburc. Pa. Ollver Blda. St. LOUi'; 'lo' Maker. of BUM sopported Rail Jolnts for Standard mnd Commonwealth Trust Bldg. Speclnl Rnll Sectloom, nlu, Glrder, Step or Comvro- Troy, N. Y. Burden Avenue mlme, Frog nnd Swltch, nnd Innuluted Rnll Montreal. Can. Joint., protected by putento. Board of Trade Blds. London, E. C.. Eng. Hlghest A~nrtlbPurls, 1000; Buffnlo, 1901: St. Louls, New Broad St. I KIRBY LUMBER CO. Houston, Texas Long Leaf MANUFACTURERS Yellow Addreas Corremvondencs J. W. CHANDLER, General Sales Agt. Nention us when writing to advertisers, it will help us both. Pine to Lumber

47 THE PRISCO-MAN The Baldwin Locomotive Works PHILADELPHIA, PA. Crane Locomotive Malleable Metal Trim- Valve opening 234 inches. Two-inch Boiler connection. Wearing parts renewable. Seats self-cleaning. Closes automatically with the pressure; impossible to stick open. 1 SAMPLE VALVE FOR TRIAL 1 WITHOUT CHARGE CRANE CO. CHICAGO ESTABLISHED 1855 ADREON MANUFACTURING CO, C~~rngbell Gra~~hite 1.ubricator Tunnbuckles Security I%nclc-up Valve Stop Wedges Security Hnil I3mce Brake Jan a Amerienrl (iraxity Coul>ling I<nuclcle Pins Clr~rlie Tension Set Tle Plate ISolts ami Suta I%rnke hllora and I&)s Sl>ihea Security Bldg., ST. LOUIS, MO. HEWITT MANUFACTURING CO, C. M. HEWITT. President 303 Hallwn? Exchanue CHICAGO Journal Bearings AND BRASS ENGINE CASTINGS OFFICE AND WORKS: 4153 Clayton Ave. ST. LOUIS. MO. ROBERT W. HUNT & CO., Engineers CHICAGO NEW YORK PITTSBURG ST. LOUIS SAN FRANCICCO MONTREAL LONDON TORONTO MEXICO CITY SEATTLE INSPECTION OF RAILROAD MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT Mention us when writing to advertisers, it will help us both.

48 TEE FRISCO-I Erst in the Hearts.of Uizfon Hen..

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