N6 RMPS. World Religion - Sikhism. Resource Booklet

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "N6 RMPS. World Religion - Sikhism. Resource Booklet"

Transcription

1 Gryffe High School N6 RMPS World Religion - Sikhism Resource Booklet Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 1

2 Introduction to the Unit In this unit we will carry out an in depth examination of Sikhism. The course will cover two key areas: beliefs and practices. We will look at the range of beliefs Sikhs hold about the nature of God, the nature of human beings and the soul, the goals we must strive for during life and the obstacles to these goals, the lives and teachings of the Ten Human Gurus, the Guru Granth Sahib (Sikh scripture) and the final goal of existence for human beings. We will look at how these beliefs are connected to each other, and how relevant they are today. We will study various sources which have led to these beliefs, and look at the impact these beliefs have on followers of the Sikh faith. We will then look at Sikh practices (what Sikhs do as a result of these beliefs), how the practices are linked to each belief, and each other, and how relevant these practices are today. This is perhaps the most difficult of the three units, as you will have a fairly basic knowledge of this faith, if any, at present. You are advised to keep a glossary of vocabulary and revise your notes regularly. You will be utilising the same skills as in the other units: knowledge & understanding, analysis and evaluation. You will be expected to: Understand key Sikh beliefs about God and human nature Analyse why Sikhs hold these belief, and how these beliefs are connected to each other and the practices carried out by Sikhs Evaluate the importance/significance/relevance of these beliefs for Sikhs today Understand Sikh beliefs about the goals of life and the final goal of existence Analyse the practices Sikhs carry out in order to fulfil these goals and evaluate the importance/significance/relevance of these practices for Sikhs today Overview of Sikhism: Sikhs believe in one God this is the same God worshipped by all religious people Sikhs believe in reincarnation they believe that all people have an atma (soul) which was once part of God, became separated from God (due to free will and humans becoming sinful) and is now on a journey to reunite with God As a result of these two beliefs, Sikhs believe that all human beings are equal, regardless of religion, gender or social class they strive to practice this belief in equality in their treatment of others Sikhs believe that they must live their lives according to God s divine will (Hukam) this involves practising compassion, selflessness and contentment, and avoiding vices such as anger, greed, lust, pride and attachment to worldly possessions Sikhs practice compassion, selflessness and contentment by praying to God, but believe prayer without action is meaningless, so also engage in selfless service to others, charitable giving and honest work Sikhs believe that by doing the above they will generate positive karma and become God focussed, pure people, which will lead to an act of God s Grace and God will allow their atma to reunite. Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 2

3 Sikhism - Context The Sikh faith began in the Punjab region of India, with the teachings of Guru Nanak ( ). Sikhs believe that Guru Nanak received a special revelation from God, who had sent him as a prophet. At this time, India and Pakistan were one country India. The two main religions were Hinduism and Islam both claiming to be the right path to God. As Hinduism was the predominant religion, society was governed by the caste system. This is an oppressive class structure, whereby everyone is born into one of four castes (varnas), is known for their caste through their name, and everyone s lifestyle, level of education, occupation and family life is dependent on their caste. Lower castes were prevented from aspiring to higher standards of living and inter-marriage between castes forbidden. Nanak spent much of his time with Hindus and Muslims he was very interested in matters of religion and spent a lot of time talking with holy men of both faiths and asking questions. According to scripture, Nanak was 30 years old when he received God s revelation a direct communication from God. When he first spoke after the event he simply said, There is no Hindu, no Muslim. Nanak then gave up his job and began to travel to spread the message of God. Guru Nanak taught that there was only One God and that all creation was part of God. He taught that human beings could not find true or lasting happiness by following religious rituals or superstitious practices, and that lasting happiness could only be achieved if human beings constantly focused on God and served Him by serving all creation. Guru Nanak s revelation was continued through a further nine human Gurus, the last of which was Guru Gobind Singh ( ). Before his death, Guru Gobind Singh declared that there would be no more human Gurus. He said that the Sikh scripture, the Guru Granth Sahib, would become the Living Guru for all Sikhs. He also created the Khalsa order, a community of saintsoldiers who were dedicated to selfless service and self-sacrifice for the good of others. You will learn more about the Gurus, the Guru Granth Sahib and the Khalsa in the course of this unit. Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 3

4 Sikh beliefs about God After receiving God s revelation, Nanak appeared in a trance and uttered the words: "There is but One God, His name is Truth, He is the Creator, He fears none, he is without hate, He never dies, He is beyond the cycle of births and death, He is self illuminated, He is realized by the kindness of the True Guru. He was True in the beginning, He was True when the ages commenced and has ever been True, He is also True now." These words form the first verse of the Guru Granth Sahib and are called the Mool Mantra. This is read by Sikhs every day as part of the Japji Sahib, the Sikh morning prayer, and sums up Sikh beliefs about God: There is only one God who has created everything. The God whom Sikhs worship is the same God worshipped by members of other faiths. God does not only know the truth of all things, God is Truth. From before the beginning of all time and forever, God is the only true reality that there is. What does all this mean? Sikhs believe that all life comes from God He is the Creator. Not only did God create the universe and everything in it, God is also the force that keeps everything in existence. Sikhs do not believe in a male or female God - God is purely spiritual, has no physical body and cannot be known or experienced through the five senses He is beyond the cycle of births and deaths. God is infinitely above and beyond everything else that exists (transcendent). God is also within all creation, including human beings (immanent) and, therefore, Sikhs believe that all creation is part of God. Sikhs believe that God has a divine will or plan for all of creation like an architect s blueprint and that humans must strive to live in harmony with this plan. Sikhs refer to this as Hukam. It is only by living in accordance with God s Hukam that Sikhs can hope to achieve reunion with God. Homework Task To be completed by Tuesday 25 th August 1. Think back to what Nanak said after his revelation, There is no Hindu, no Muslim. Remember, India was, and still is, a very religious country, with tensions running high between Hindu and Muslim. What did Nanak mean by, There is no Hindu, no Muslim? 2. How might this statement have been received by those living in India at the time? 3. How does this statement link to a) beliefs about the nature of God, and b) beliefs about the nature of human beings? Sikhs believe that the only way for humans to know God and understand God s Hukam is by studying the universe. This is because God is the creator and the universe reveals the imprint of God s Order/Plan. Sikhs do not believe in shutting themselves away in monasteries they reject the life of an ascetic because they believe that we must fully engage in the world and with other human beings if we want to truly understand how God wants us to live. Sikhs also follow the teachings of the Ten Human Gurus and the Guru Granth Sahib in order to learn about God s Hukam, as these teachings have come directly from God. Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 4

5 Sikh beliefs about human beings Sikhs believe that human beings are made up of three important parts the mind, body and soul (atma). We have been created by God, and therefore every part of us is good. However, our physical body will eventually die, but our atma, which is pure spirit, is immortal. Sikhs regard being born into human form to be a great blessing because it is only in human form that Sikhs can hope to achieve reunion with God. This is due to our minds, and the fact we differ from all other life forms in our ability to reason and utilise our moral conscience to do good, rather than evil, acts. In the Guru Granth Sahib (the Sikh scriptures), Guru Arjan expresses this belief by saying: You have been blessed by being born human, it is an opportunity which has been given you to meet the Lord. We must use our free will responsibly in order to live in harmony with God s Hukam. Beliefs about the atma Sikhs believe that our atma was once part of God, but has been separated from God due to ignorance maya, haumai and the Five Evils/Thieves, which you will learn about soon. The atma is, like God, pure spirit and immortal. It is the most important part of us as it is the part which will eventually reunite with God. In order to do this it must travel though many different life forms. Each life form progresses to the next, until the atma is reborn in human form. At this point, the life form must utilise its free will and moral conscience in order to progress towards to reunion with God. Recap: The atam is the most important part of humans it is part of the One True Reality, God. Like God, it is immortal. The atma has existed since before the creation of the universe journeyed through many life forms and, in this life, has been reborn into a human form. However, the body and mind are also important Sikhs do not ignore the physical, emotional and mental needs that human beings have. The body houses the soul, while the mind allows a Sikh to develop and strengthen their relationship with God. Karma The progression of the atma towards reunion with God is dependent on the law of karma. This can be described simply as the belief that all actions have consequences for the person who acts. These consequences do not just involve the immediate physical results - there are also moral consequences which affect the soul on its journey towards reunion with God. Karma determines the nature of further rebirths if reunion with God is not achieved. Actions, a life style or attitudes which are not in line with God s Hukam create negative karma. This negative karma keeps the soul trapped in the cycle of life, death and rebirth where it will suffer and fail to find true happiness. Living a life which is completely in harmony with God s Will or Hukam frees the soul from the effects of karma and leaves it open to an act of God s Grace. This will allow the soul to reunite with God. Reunion with God means that the soul is free from the cycle of life, death and rebirth forever. Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 5

6 The Gurus taught that it is not necessary to die in order to be free from karma and rebirth. Sikhism, unlike other religions, teaches that the final goal of existence (for Sikh, reunion with God) can be achieved while still alive. Anyone who chooses to live in complete harmony with God s Will or Hukam, and keeps God in mind at all times, will reach a point at which they no longer generate karma, positive or negative. At this point, their mind is completely focused on God and the person is living in complete harmony with God s Hukam. This is known as Jivan Mukhti. As a result of this belief, the main focus of life for Sikhs is not in avoiding negative karma or trying to create positive karma. There is no point focusing on trying to gain positive karma, because in doing so, the person is thinking about themselves and how they will benefit, instead of thinking about God. Instead, the focus must be on listening to, and obeying, God s Will or Hukam and remaining open to God s Grace at all times. A person who constantly keeps God in mind and lives in harmony with God s Will or Hukam is known as gurmukh. Free Will Human beings cannot influence events or change the course of their lives your current life has been determined by past karma. However, you do have a choice you can still choose to accept or reject God. Accepting God and acting positively leads to the development of positive karma this may lead to reunion. Ignoring God s Will and concentrating only on yourself will lead to endless cycles of birth, death and rebirth. Remember, according to Sikhs we are blessed by being born in human form. Only humans can generate karma, and only humans can achieve reunion. This is because God has given us the gift of free will we can use this to reject ignorance and evil and try to live in harmony with Hukam. Doing this opens us up to God s grace we now have the opportunity to reunite with God. Therefore, free will is a very important Sikh belief, and links directly to beliefs about God, atma and karma. Recap There is only One God, who created and sustains all life. Humans have a soul (atma) which was once part of God and is on a journey to reunite with God. This journey is affected by karma choosing good actions produces positive karma which moves the soul towards reunion, but doing bad produces negative karma which keeps the soul trapped in the cycle of birth, death and rebirth. Therefore, humans have free will following God is a choice, not compulsion. The diagram above should now make more sense to you! Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 6

7 Hukam All creation, the nature of the world and everything in it and all of human life is a result of God s Hukam God s Will or Command. Humans should not ask, Why has God created us like this? God s Hukam cannot be understood by the human mind, but can be known through interacting with God s creation. The concept of Hukam could lead people to believe that God controls our lives and we are powerless. This is not the case. God has also given us the gift of free will - we can use our free will to choose to live in harmony with God s Will, or to reject God this freedom is part of God s Hukam. Humans should use their mind to think about their choices possessions, praise and power do not bring lasting happiness. Lasting happiness can only be found by keeping God in mind at all times while acting in line with His Will. Sikh Practices We will now look at the some key Sikh practices relating to their beliefs about God and human nature. A practice is an act carried out by a religious person as a direct result of their belief about something. As Sikhs believe that there is only one God, they believe that all religions worship the same God. Furthermore, as God created the universe and everything in it, they believe that all human beings are equal. We all have an atma, which is part of God, and we are all on the same journey to reunite with God. These beliefs about equality are the central tenets of the Sikh faith and are linked to all of the Sikh practices we will look at. Religious Equality Remember, Guru Nanak was born in the Punjab region of India, in which the predominant religious were Hinduism and Islam. The different beliefs and practices led to hostility between these religions. Although Nanak was born into a Hindu family, he spent time learning from Muslim holy men. After receiving his revelation from God, Nanak s first words were, There is no Hindu, there is no Muslim. For Sikhs, this was Nanak s way of emphasising that all religions follow One God. Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Sikh Guru, also reinforced the equality of all faiths: God is in the Hindu temple as well as in the mosque. God is addressed in both the Hindu and Muslim prayer; all human beings are one though they may appear different. They are all one form and one God has made them all. As a result of these beliefs in religious equality, Sikhs will ensure that they welcome all people, of all faiths into the Gurdwara (Sikh place of worship). Sikhs also provide a free community kitchen in all Gurdwaras this will serve food to all people, regardless of faith. The langar was first introduced by Guru Nanak in order to show solidarity amongst people of different religions and castes. The Gurus ensured that only vegetarian food would be served in the langar this is to accommodate religions with food laws, such as Hindus, who do not eat beef, and Muslims, who require halal slaughter of meat. Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 7

8 In addition, Sikhs regularly engage in inter faith dialogue. They invite non Sikhs into their Gurdwara in order to educate them about Sikhi. No attempts are made to convert people of other faiths Sikhs do not believe that theirs is the only path to God. Instead they demonstrate respect for all beliefs. Religious equality is also demonstrated through the hymns included in the Guru Granth Sahib which were written by Hindus and Muslims these are still sung by Sikhs today. Social Equality The Hindu community in India was organised into a rigid class structure - the caste system. There were four main classes (varnas), which were divided into castes (jatis), and people s status in life depended on their caste. Hindus believed that only Brahmins, the top caste, could achieve reunion with God, and the this system was the cause of much discrimination and oppression within Hinduism. Today, the practice of discriminating on grounds of class or caste is illegal in India. The Gurus rejected this idea of class or caste: Recognise the light (of God) and do not ask for the caste. There is no caste in the next world. According to Sikhs, everyone has the opportunity to reunite with God in this lifetime: "All beings and creatures are His; He belongs to all" (Guru Granth Sahib Ji, 425). Sikhs practice social equality through the langar set up to overcome social division in which everyone takes a role in preparing and serving food, regardless of social standing in the community. Everyone also sits on the floor to show that no one is above anyone else, everyone is equal. In the UK today langar is responsible for feeing tens of thousands of poor and homeless people every week, with langar supplementing food banks in many areas of England. Because a person s surname identified which caste the person was from, Guru Gobind Singh gave all Sikh men the last name "Singh" and all Sikh women the last name "Kaur" so that no one could identify anyone s caste. Gender Equality The Sikh Gurus made it clear that their teachings about equality included women. God is neither male nor female God is described using both male and female words in the Guru Granth Sahib, and many hymns speak of the importance of women. The Gurus spoke out against the discrimination of women including the practice of sati (where a widowed woman would throw herself upon her husband s funeral pyre), the wearing of veils and taking more than one wife. "Man is born from a woman; within woman, man is conceived; to a woman he is engaged and married. Man is friends with woman; through woman, the future generations exist. When his woman passes away, he seeks another woman; to a woman a man is bound. So why call her bad? From her, kings are born. From a woman, woman is born; without woman there would be no one at all" (Guru Granth Sahib Ji, 473). Women are encouraged to take part and lead worship there should be no male hierarchy within the Gurdwara. Sikh girls educated, and encouraged to attend university/go into a profession. Guru Gobind Singh encouraged women to become members of the Khalsa and all Sikh women were instructed to take the surname Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 8

9 Kaur (Princess) and not the name of their husbands. Langar is prepared and served by males and females. Homework To be submitted by Monday 8 th September 1. How do Sikh beliefs about equality differ from your perceptions about religion? 2. Which aspects of equality do you think are most widely practised among the Sikh community? Why? Which aspects do you think are least widely practised? Why? 3. Which aspects of equality do think would be most difficult to practise? Why? Beliefs about human nature & the barriers to reunion Remember, Sikhs believe that human beings have a unique opportunity to be reunited with God because they alone have the ability to freely recognise God and to choose to act in a way that will lead to reunion. However, we continue to be separated from God. Sikhs believe that this is due to maya and haumai, two barriers to reunion. Maya Maya, or illusion is a mistaken attachment to the physical world which leads the soul to forget that God is the One True Reality. This is part of human nature and affects everyone. Maya leads the soul to misunderstand what is important in life and become attached to the physical world. It leads a person to believe that they will find happiness through a new car/house/pair of shoes when true happiness can only be found through God by thinking about and remembering God at all times. It is important to remember, though, that the physical world is good, it was created by God, but it will not last. God is the only lasting important part of everything that lives. Attachment to the physical world possessions, friends, family, careers leads the soul to forget this. Maya is difficult for Sikhs to avoid, as they are expected to engage in society and live as householders with families. Attachment to friends and families, especially children, can be extremely difficult for Sikhs. Even in practising their religion it is easy for Sikhs to be affected by maya. If they become too attached to practices such as prayer, charity work, etc, they can forget why they are doing these things. They begin to think only about the practices themselves, the satisfaction or pride of carrying these out and not about the reason why these are important. He nourished us in the mother s womb; why forget Him from the mind? Why forget from the mind such a Great Giver, who gave us sustenance in the fire of the womb? Nothing can harm one whom the Lord inspires to embrace His Love. As is the fire within the womb, so is Maya outside. The fire of Maya is one and the same; the Creator has staged this play. According to His Will, the child is born, and the family is very pleased. Love for the Lord wears off, and the child becomes attached to desires; the script of Maya runs its course. This is Maya, by which the Lord is forgotten; emotional attachment and love of duality well up. Says Nanak, by Guru s Grace, those who enshrine love for the Lord find Him, in the midst of Maya. GGS and this leads to: Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 9

10 Haumai Haumai self-centredness/egoism is when humans put their own needs/desires ahead of God s Will/Hukam. Haumai is a direct result of maya we become so attached to the physical/material world that we begin to crave possessions in order to feel happy. We begin to think we are the most important thing in the world, not God, and that our desires/cravings must be satisfied. Our actions become motivated by self-centredness I want, I need, etc and the purpose of our actions becomes self-serving, not to serve God. Even doing good deeds can be the result of haumai by thinking about feeling good, or personal reward or even bringing yourself closer to reunion, you are self-seeking or acting in your own self interests. For example, working in the langar in order to generate good karma to try to break the cycle of rebirth is living by haumai you are thinking about the reward/benefit to you, not to other people. When a person is constantly thinking about how their actions will benefit him/her we call this person manmukh. This is someone who is totally consumed by their own ego they cannot serve God as they are too caught up in serving themselves. Unless a person can overcome haumai, he/she will not be reunited with God. Self-centred pride (haumai) is the mark we bear, determining all that we do. Selfcentred pride keeps us firmly bound, tied to the round of rebirth. How is it born and how destroyed, how can we loosen its grip?...self-centred pride is a loathsome disease yet one which is subject to cure. Grace is the balm, if God so will, wrought by the Guru s Word. GGS Summary: Maya and haumai are often described as diseases, and the only cure for these diseases is to realise that God is the only lasting part of all creation. When this happens human beings no longer try to find happiness in the things in life that do not last e.g. possessions, success, and praise. Instead, they realise that it is only by obeying God s Will/Hukam, and by keeping God in mind at all times, that lasting happiness can be found. Maya and haumai are part of Hukam they have a role to play in creation. God has taught us how to overcome maya and haumai. Through the Gurus, God taught people that maya and haumai can be overcome by training the will to live in harmony with God s Will. Homework To be submitted by 15 th September Overcoming maya and haumai has greater benefits for the individual than for society as a whole. How valid is this statement? Write a short essay answering the question above. This question involves the skill of evaluation you are passing judgement about whether the statement is valid or not. Think about why someone would want to overcome maya and haumai would this help them or society more? Use the following plan: Brief intro giving explanation of maya and haumai what they are, why they exist and how they can be overcome Paragraph showing statement is valid more benefit to individual Paragraph showing statement is invalid benefit to both individual and society Brief closing statement your view and why Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 10

11 The Five Evils The Guru Granth Sahib often refers to five evils, vices or thieves which human beings should try to control. In order to progress towards reunion with God, a Sikh must actively try to control these five evils as they will lead the soul away from God and steal the unique opportunity to reunite with God. The Five Evils are the root cause of maya and haumai, are part of God s Hukam, and therefore affect all human beings. 1. Kam (Lust) Sexual desire, on its own, is not regarded by Sikhs as evil. The pleasure which human beings experience through sex is given by God, so is good. However, when sexual desire is simply to satisfy one s own needs and no longer focuses on love for another person, it is regarded as an evil. Furthermore, sex should only take place between a husband and wife and should be motivated by love for the other person, not selfish, greedy desires. 2. Krodh (Anger) This is all-consuming and destructive anger rather than justified anger. For example the anger felt when watching children dying from starvation on the news, is perfectly justified. The anger felt towards other drivers at rush hour when you are trying to get to work quickly, is not. This is because krodh leads to lack of self-control and is harmful to others. When human beings become angry they can no longer think clearly they lash out at others and say or do hurtful things. Anger is an example of haumai at work it is based on the ego and directed at others. The feelings of others are forgotten and the person is totally consumed by his or her own feelings. 3. Lobh (Greed) A desire to gain wealth, possessions, fame, or things that belong to others are all examples of greed. While it is not wrong to enjoy the good things in life, to be wealthy or to be admired by others, we must be careful not to become too focused on these things. We should make the most of what God has given us, but always remember that we have what we have as result of God s Grace. If a person s actions and thoughts are focused on possessing the material things in life he or she is no longer focused on God and is moving further and further from reunion. 4. Moh (Attachment) Moh refers to any form of emotional attachment which makes human beings forget God. When people focus all their energies and affections on possessions, a person, even family, they begin to believe that they cannot survive without them. They can forget that the only truly lasting or important part of creation is God. Love for family, is not evil in itself - but when attachment becomes excessive it is destructive and leads the soul away from God. This is perhaps the most difficult of the Five Evils to understand and to overcome. Sikhs are required to become householders and take an active role in society. This requires them to have a job, a family and friends. The difficulty is finding a balance between enjoying having these things, love for friends and family, and being attached to them believing that they are yours and will bring you lasting happiness. This is especially difficult with regards to children your children are not yours, you love them and protect Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 11

12 them and raise them, but your (and their) relationship with God is more important as only in your relationship with God can you achieve lasting happiness. 5. Ankar (Pride) This is often regarded by Sikhs as the worst of the five evils. Pride makes human beings believe that they are more important than others - which makes them treat others badly and leads to injustice. Furthermore, it can lead to the belief that they are more important than God - they take personal credit for the successes, good qualities, wealth and talents they have they forget that God is responsible for these things. Pride leads to haumai because it makes people believe that they are the most important thing in life and leads to self-centredness. Homework To be submitted by 17 th September 1. Describe how a person affected by maya and haumai would behave. 2. Do you think it is possible to be completely free from maya and haumai? Why/why not? 3. Which of the Five Evils would it be most difficult to avoid? Why? In order to overcome maya, haumai and the Five Evils, Sikhs must practice developing God-like virtues compassion, selflessness and contentment. We all have the qualities necessary to reunite with God, but we must work on developing these. Compassion In order to reunite, Sikhs must develop their love for God by developing compassion for all of God s creation. Sikhs believe that God exists within all living things, so in order to serve God, we must serve creation. Sikhs demonstrate compassion Selflessness Carrying out good actions while thinking about potential rewards (karma, reunion) is selfish. Sikhs must practice selflessness they must do good deeds, serve creation, without any though of reward. Sikhs believe that if the motive for any action is selfish, then the action is worthless. It is only when humans act out of love for God that actions can bring us closer to God. The Gurus taught that the human mind must become constantly focused on God, in order to ensure that all actions are carried out with God in mind. Contentment Sikhs believe that the human condition is decided by God s Hukam we have what we have and we are where we are as a result of God s Will. Therefore, we must learn to be content. This does not mean that we cannot strive to be a better person, do better in our education and career, but just means that we should reject greed and attachment we should stop craving things we think will bring us happiness. We should also avoid pride believing that we are solely responsible for the good things in our lives (the promotion, good exam results, good looks) and instead appreciate the God has blessed us with these things. Truthfulness One of the most important virtues a Sikh must try to develop is truthful living. Truth is not just about speaking the truth but also about recognising and living in line with the true nature of reality. Acting justly towards others, honesty, treating everyone as equals and avoiding criticising others are all examples of truthful living for Sikhs. Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 12

13 Homework To be submitted by 22 nd September 1. Which of the virtues identified above would Sikhs find most difficult to develop? Why? 2. What practices could Sikhs undertake in order to develop compassion, selflessness, truthful living and contentment? Developing Virtues Sikh Practices Sikhs practice developing the virtues highlighted above by focusing on three golden rules pray, work and give. Pray Sikhs worship God in a number of ways reading God s Word as set out in the Guru Granth Sahib, meditating on God s name and singing hymns. Simran (also referred to as naam simran or naam japna) is the Sikh term for prayer, but really means meditating on God s name at all times. This is done by repeating one of the names for God ( Waheguru ) or repeating the Mool Mantra, either out loud or in their mind. The purpose of simran is to practice keeping God in mind at all times which will help Sikhs to act altruistically and avoid the temptations of maya and haumai. Prayer alone, however, is not enough to practise devotion to God. By praying, Sikhs are strengthening their relationship with God. They are focusing on god s Hukam, not on their own ego, and therefore become more God-focused. This means that the actions they do will be done with God in mind, not themselves. Prayer is essential to ensure that the mind is focused on God and that actions are altruistic, but prayer without action is meaningless. Compassion must be practised by serving others. Sewa means selfless service this involves serving God through serving creation, with no thought of personal reward. Sikhs are taught to show compassion from a young age young Sikhs will carry out small tasks in the Gurdwara, such as polishing shoes and sweeping the floor. As they grow up these acts of sewa (selfless service) develop Sikhs begin to help prepare and serve food in the langar. Many Sikhs take food out of the Gurdwara and serve local homeless people. Work Kirt karna is honest work, and is the way Sikhs practice truthful and compassionate living. Any work a Sikh does must not involve harming any aspect of God s creation. The Gurus instructed their followers to marry and live the life of a responsible householder the path of a celibate or an ascetic is not part of the Sikh way of life. Sikhs believe that it is only by fully participating in society that they can gain true understanding and compassion for all God s creation. Kirt karna emphasises the need to act in an ethical way in all aspects of life - Sikhs should refrain from any form of work that involves deceit, exploiting or harming others. For this reason, many Sikhs will not work in the gambling, arms or tobacco industries and many Sikhs can be found in caring professions such as medicine, teaching and working with charitable organisations. Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 13

14 Give Vand Chhakna means charitable giving. It can take the form of, for example, giving money for the upkeep of the gurdwara, sharing with family, friends or even strangers who are in financial difficulty, or giving to charitable organisations and is not restricted to the Sikh community. However, it can also take the form of giving time, expertise or practical help to anyone in need. Formally, Sikhs must try to give a minimum of ten percent of their income or time for the benefit of society in general and in particular for the poor and needy. This is called daswandh. Homework To be submitted by 6 th October 1. Which of the practices identified above would Sikhs find most difficult? Why? 2. Of the practices identified, which do you think would benefit a) the Sikh and b) the community the most? Gurmukh It is only by becoming totally focused on God that a person can reunite with God. Someone who reaches this state is known as gurmukh. This is the opposite of manmukh a person who is totally consumed by the ego and does not live in harmony with God s Hukam. Sikhs try to become gurmukh by keeping God in mind at all times, while playing an active role in society. They can do this by listening to God s Word, meditating on God s name and carrying out selfless service to God s creation. Once they have achieved gurmukh (which is a stage of spiritual development), they are completely focused on God, all the time, with no effort required. At this point a Sikh is a pure person all their actions are carried out selflessly, they show compassion for other people without thinking about it and are perfectly content. They are unaffected by maya, haumai or the Five Evils. Prayer plays a big part in becoming gurmukh. Through prayer, humans become more attached to God and less attached to themselves. People begin to focus less on the things in life that won t last, and begin to understand God s Hukam. The moment when God grants His Grace and a person finally becomes totally Godconscious or gurmukh is determined by God s Will/Hukam. Someone who has become gurmukh can still be affected by maya and haumai. If they begin to feel pride in their accomplishments, or begin to focus on the rewards that being gurmukh may bring, a Sikh will lose this state of mind and be overcome by maya and haumai. The Five Khands and The Final Goal of Existence In order to reach the point of reunion, the Gurus taught that there were five khands or stages of spiritual development. The Five Khands are not different physical worlds but are different levels of spiritual awareness or consciousness. At any stage of spiritual development human beings can be overcome by maya and haumai. Although human beings must help themselves along the path to reunion, through prayer, selfless action, etc, God s Grace is needed to progress along the stages of spiritual development. The human soul must go through each of these khands before it is reunited with God. How long this development takes is dependent upon many things: a person s spiritual awareness, self-discipline, attitudes and actions but, most importantly, God s Grace. However, if God chooses, then a person can reach the final stage in an instant. Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 14

15 Dharam Khand When the atma/soul is born into human form, it enters the first khand, known as Dharam Khand - it is also known as the Realm of Duty. Here the soul must learn to act in harmony with its human nature and God s Will. This is involves listening to and obeying the conscience, which is God guiding from within. Ignoring the conscience leads to people becoming self-centred (haumai), and being trapped in the cycle of rebirth. Those who learn to live in harmony with God s Will for human beings (their duty) can then, by God s Grace, progress to the next khand or stage of spiritual development. Gian Khand During this stage the mind begins to understand the nature of the universe and the true purpose of human life. Here, human beings develop an awareness of the greatness of God and understand that they are not the centre of the universe. From this realm, again by an act of God s Grace, the atma can progress to Saram Khand or the Realm of Endeavour. Saram Khand In this third stage of spiritual development, knowledge deepens into a more profound wisdom. The soul experiences the greatness and awesomeness of creation and God s Will. A new level of awareness is reached and a new perspective on reality is gained. To a certain extent, the level of awareness reached at this stage of spiritual development cannot be properly understood until it is experienced and the same is true of the final two khands. Karam Khand God s Grace again moves the atma/soul on to the next level of spiritual awareness, Karam Khand. Here, human beings are fully aware spiritually and God is ever present in their minds and hearts. This is the point at which Sikhs would become gurmukh completely God-focused. Sikhs believe that those who have reached this level of spiritual awareness also have immense spiritual powers. However, the Gurus taught that these spiritual powers should never be used particularly not to impress others or to try to interfere with God s Will or Plan. Using spiritual powers for these purposes is an example of haumai. Sach Khand This is the stage of spiritual development when the atma/soul can reunite with God. God is Truth and in the Realm of Truth the atma, by an act of God s Grace, can reach the final goal of life. Human beings experience true and lasting happiness, or bliss as they reunite with God while still living. This is known as Jivan Mukhti. Sikhs believe that someone who is Jivan Mukht lives in a state of unending bliss or happiness and is free from the cycle of rebirth. Material difficulties or successes become unimportant both are greeted equally. The Sikh can no longer be affected by maya and haumai, and is in no danger of becoming overcome again. When such a person dies they will not be born into any physical form but will remain permanently united with God who is pure Spirit. Remember, only God s Grace can bring the atma/soul into reunion. For Sikhs, the reality of reunion with God is beyond description. The Guru Granth Sahib contains many beautiful images to help describe reunion but Sikhs believe that words cannot fully express the state of joy which is reached. It is a state of Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 15

16 spiritual awareness which Sikhs believe can only be truly understood when it is experienced. The soul/atma has merged with its original source, which is God, and the final goal of life has been reached. When reunion with God is reached, the mind is in a state of complete calm, is not affected by any desires and is totally selfless. This state of mind is called sahej (equipoise). The human will is in total harmony with God s Will/Hukam. The person who is Jivan Mukht automatically acts in line with God s Will no effort or conscious decision is needed. No matter what physical events or circumstances are experienced, the soul is totally focused on God and remains unaffected. Once a human being has reached this state of sahej or equipoise, s/he can endure great physical suffering but remain unaffected by this. Equally, if the person experiences worldly praise, success and wealth s/he remains in the same state of calm devotion. Sikhs believe that, for such people, the goal of life had been reached and no external events can affect their experience of bliss. Remember: The Gurus warned against becoming too focused on this goal. If it is God s Will, Sikhs will achieve reunion by an act of Grace it is not within any individual human being s power to become reunited. Attachment to anything that is not God leads the soul further and further from reunion the same would be true of attachment to achieving the spiritual bliss of reunion. For this reason, the main focus of life for all Sikhs is to remain constantly focused on God through meditation and selfless service to humanity. Homework Task To be submitted 27 th October 1. Why is it important that Sikhs do not focus all their attention on achieving the final goal of life? 2. Think about the Sikh beliefs and practices you have studied so far. Which of these beliefs and practices do you think will help Sikhs to achieve the final goal of life? The Means to the Goals Help is needed if you want to achieve things in life. It is the same in Sikhism.It is not possible to reunite on your own. God provides people with help in the form of: the Ten Human Gurus, the Guru Granth Sahib and God s Grace. The Gurus Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 16

17 The word "Guru" is a Sanskrit word meaning teacher. In Sikhism the word means the descent of divine guidance to mankind provided through ten Enlightened Masters. This honour of being called a Sikh Guru applies only to the ten living Gurus from 1469 to Thereafter it refers to the Sikh Holy Scriptures, the Guru Granth Sahib. Sikh gurus were responsible for the leadership of the Sikh religion and community for the first 200 years or so of its existence. Nanak (the founder) was the first guru, and he chose one of his followers to be the guru who succeeded him. After that, the guru succession happened along mostly hereditary lines. The divine spirit was passed from one Guru to the next as "The light of a lamp which lights another does not abate. Similarly a spiritual leader and his disciple become equal, Nanak says the truth." The Gurus help Sikhs on their journey towards reunion with God as they provide good examples of how to live an ideal life in complete harmony with God s Hukam. All Gurus are respected equally no one Guru is more important than the other. This is mainly due to the fact that they are all incarnations of the same atma. The Gurus are unique in that they had non-karmic births: their lives weren t the result of karma from a previous rebirth, instead they were sent especially by God to help others. They were Jivan Mukht and were not affected by karma. Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 17

18 Sikhism rejects any form of idol worship including worship of pictures of the Gurus. Although some of the Gurus did pose for paintings, unfortunately none of these historical paintings have survived. Artists renditions are for inspirational purposes only and should not be regarded as objects of worship themselves. Homework To be submitted by 17 th November 1. Which of the Sikh Gurus could be considered most important? Why? Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 18

19 The Tenth Guru - Guru Gobind Singh ( ) Guru Gobind Singh is important to Sikhs because he created the Khalsa on the Vaisakhi of 1699 (Vaisakhi is a festival which marks the beginning of the New Year in India and is celebrated on the 13 th April). Guru Gobind Singh asked his followers who was willing to give their head for God. One brave man eventually came forward and was taken into a tent. The Guru came out with a bloodstained sword and asked for another four volunteers. After the fifth man went into the tent, the Guru brought them back out alive and unharmed. They were dressed in a special uniform and are known as the five beloved ones (Panj Piaray). The Panj Piaray were all from different castes they all had different surnames which identified to others which caste they were from. As a result of this, the Guru gave them all the same surname Singh, meaning lion. Guru Gobind Singh asked the Panj Piaray to baptise him so that he, too, could join the Khalsa an initiated group of saint soldiers who would represent the ideal of Sikhism by sprinkling amrit, holy water, on his head and face. All those in the crowd, including women, were involved in this first ceremony, which shows that everyone is equal. Women who joined the Khalsa were given the surname Kaur, meaning princess. Not all Sikhs choose to join the Khalsa. Sikhs born into a Sikh family and accept the teachings of the Gurus, are known as Sahajdhari Sikhs. While those who take the firm commitment to join the Khalsa and are baptised Sikhs, are known as Amritdhari Sikhs. When you become part of the Khalsa there are set obligations which are sometimes to unrealistic for many Sikhs to commit to. These involve: A strict code of conduct. Khalsa Sikhs must act as a role model for other Sikhs and represent Sikhism to non-sikhs. They must develop a strong spiritual relationship with God through meditation and regular prayer helping out in the Gurdwara and a strong focus on Sewa. Renouncing alcohol, tobacco and drugs. The body is the physical house for the soul and must be honoured as such. Any substance which will cloud the mind and lead to poor decision making/actions must be avoided. Khalsa Sikhs will not handle alcohol, tobacco or drugs, and these substances must not be brought into the Gurdwara. While Sikhs will serve langar to those who use these substances, the food will be taken out of the Gurdwara, Renouncing meat. They believe God s divine light runs through every living thing and this is why they will not eat meat. A key role in the running of the Gurdwara. It is usually members of the Khalsa who sit on the committees in the Gurdwara and who people will turn to if they have a question or require guidance. To become a member of the Khalsa a Sikh man or woman must wear the Five Ks and follow strictly the Sikh way of life. The 5Ks are items of faith which display and show the wearer s conviction to God and are a constant reminder of their love for Him. These are a religious obligation for Amritdhari Sikhs. If you break one, you must be reinitiated. This also applies to the code of conduct, if any of those rules are broken. Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 19

20 Kesh uncut hair. Amritdhari Sikhs will not cut any hair on any part of their body. This is to show respect for the body God has given them. Kangha a wooden comb, kept tucked in the turban. This is a symbol of cleanliness and purity. Sikhs must keep their body physically clewan and tidy, as well as their mind and soul spiritually clean. Kachera cotton shorts/underwear. These are a symbol of modesty and purity. Must always be worn. Kara an iron bracelet worn on the wrist. This represents God no beginning, no end. Acts as a reminder for Sikhs every time they are going to act they will feel their kara and be reminded to act with God in mind. Kirpan a sword. This should be carried at all times - Sikhs in the UK are legally allowed to carry their kirpan. If the kirpan is brandished it must see blood. Otherwise it should be kept hidden away. Many Sikhs choose not to join the Khalsa because they feel it is not relevant any more members of the Khalsa were originally to act as saint-soldiers and take up arms to defend anyone being oppressed, and many people think this is no longer required. Some Sikhs may view it is an elite club, which claims to be better than non baptised Sikhs. There is also the fear that being part of the Khalsa can lead to maya and haumai Sikhs may begin to feel they are better than others. For many Sikhs, it is too difficult to live up to these ideals it is difficult to maintain the 5Ks, particularly those Sikhs living in the Western world. Some might say it is perfectly possible to reunite without joining the Khalsa it is not necessary. However, other Sikhs may argue that the Khalsa provides them with a spiritual structure they are forced to be disciplined and think about actions/thoughts. Joining the Khalsa also provides opportunities for sewa and simran people will be more likely to ask you for help. You are renouncing temptations you are developing a deeper relationship with God and a deeper understanding of your faith. Many Sikhs will opt to wear some of the 5 Ks before committing fully to the Khalsa. The most common to wear is the kara. Sangat Those Sikhs who choose not to be part of the Khalsa are still members of the world wide Sikh community, known as the Panth. However, they are also part of the Sangat, the local congregation the people you would go to the Gurdwara Gryffe High School RMPS Department Page 20

25% Area of Study: Area of Study: God. Central Concepts. The Nature of God God as Creator God s relationship with human life

25% Area of Study: Area of Study: God. Central Concepts. The Nature of God God as Creator God s relationship with human life Candidates are expected to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of beliefs, teachings and practices within a world faith. Reference to relevant sources of wisdom and authority are expected, including

More information

Course : GCSE RS BOARD: AQA

Course : GCSE RS BOARD: AQA Year 9 Course : GCSE RS BOARD: AQA Content Paper 1 Sikhism Students should be aware that Sikhism is one of the diverse religious traditions and beliefs in Great Britain today and that the main religious

More information

25% Area of Study: Area of Study: God. Central Concepts. The Nature of God God as Creator God s relationship with human life

25% Area of Study: Area of Study: God. Central Concepts. The Nature of God God as Creator God s relationship with human life Explain how and why Sikhs might show equality to others.(8 marks) Explain how and why Sikhs might show equality to others.(8 marks) Candidates are expected to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of

More information

Unit 2: Religions that Originated in South Asia

Unit 2: Religions that Originated in South Asia Unit 2: Religions that Originated in South Asia Sikhism originated in the Punjab region of India around the 16 th century CE Sikh means disciple or one who is devoted to a religion The founder was a man

More information

Hinduism & Sikhism UNIT 2: RELIGION AND BELIEF SYSTEMS

Hinduism & Sikhism UNIT 2: RELIGION AND BELIEF SYSTEMS Hinduism & Sikhism UNIT 2: RELIGION AND BELIEF SYSTEMS Hinduism Origins No founder Oldest living religion dating back to 2000 BCE The Four Varnas Early Indian society operated on a caste system that is

More information

Higher RMPS 2018 Specimen Question Paper 1 Candidate evidence (with marks)

Higher RMPS 2018 Specimen Question Paper 1 Candidate evidence (with marks) Candidate 1 Of all the issues relating to organ donation, presumed consent is the most important. To what extent do you agree? There is currently moves being made in Scotland to move from a system of informed

More information

SIKHISM. A Primer for PUMC Religious Diversity Students Fall 2018 HISTORY

SIKHISM. A Primer for PUMC Religious Diversity Students Fall 2018 HISTORY HISTORY Sikhism is a young religion dating from 1469 when Guru Nanak Dev Ji was born in India. It is not connected to Hinduism or Islam. Guru Nanak s message was simple We are all one created by the One

More information

Religions of South Asia. Hinduism Sikhism Buddhism Jainism

Religions of South Asia. Hinduism Sikhism Buddhism Jainism Religions of South Asia Hinduism Sikhism Buddhism Jainism Hinduism Historical Origins: Hinduism is one of the world s oldest religions and originated in India in about 1500 BC. Scholars believe that it

More information

Mark Scheme (Results) June GCSE Religious Studies (5RS14) Sikhism

Mark Scheme (Results) June GCSE Religious Studies (5RS14) Sikhism Scheme (Results) June 2011 GCSE Religious Studies (5RS14) Sikhism Edexcel is one of the leading examining and awarding bodies in the UK and throughout the world. We provide a wide range of qualifications

More information

Overview of Sikh faith Quicksheet for ward inductions

Overview of Sikh faith Quicksheet for ward inductions Overview of Sikh faith Quicksheet for ward inductions Sikhism was founded in the 16th century in the Punjab district of what is now India and Pakistan. It was founded by Guru Nanak and is based on his

More information

Guru Gobind Singh and the Khalsa

Guru Gobind Singh and the Khalsa Vaisakhi/Baisakhi Guru Gobind Singh was the last of the Guru s and his birth is remembered on January 5th. Baisakhi is the festival to remember the formation of the Khalsa on April 13th. The festival which

More information

Why you will be studying these beliefs and concepts

Why you will be studying these beliefs and concepts The Big Picture What you will be studying In this topic you will be addressing: 1 What the Mool Mantar says; look at the Ik Onkar symbol; one God (Waheguru, Wonderful Lord ) 2 The purpose of life, qualities

More information

Sikhism. Gurus. Founding of the Religion The word Sikh

Sikhism. Gurus. Founding of the Religion The word Sikh Sikhism SLMS/10 Sikhism is a religion that originated in northern India during the late 1400s in the waning years of the Delhi Sultanate. By world history standards, the religion is a young one. Sikhism

More information

Section 2 Matters of life and death

Section 2 Matters of life and death Unit 1 Religion and life: Sikhism Section 2 Matters of life and death Topic 1.2.2 Sikhism and life after death Revised Sikhs believe in life after death because: it is taught in the Guru Granth Sahib which

More information

GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES A Paper 1: Sikhism

GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES A Paper 1: Sikhism SPECIMEN MATERIAL Please write clearly, in block capitals. Centre number Candidate number Surname Forename(s) Candidate signature GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES A Paper 1: Sikhism Specimen Morning Time allowed:

More information

Sikhism Test your knowledge

Sikhism Test your knowledge Sikhism Test your knowledge Match up the informa9on 'learner' or 'disciple' Sikhism comes from India teacher Guru Nanak about 500 years ago Guru means Sikhism started Sikhism means was the founder of Sikhism

More information

A-level Religious Studies

A-level Religious Studies A-level Religious Studies RSS09 World Religions 1: Buddhism OR Hinduism OR Sikhism Report on the Examination 2060 June 2014 Version: 1.0 Further copies of this Report are available from aqa.org.uk Copyright

More information

Faith and Society Files: Encountering Sikhs

Faith and Society Files: Encountering Sikhs Faith and Society Files: Encountering Sikhs In this document, author Paul Weller provides background information about Sikh beliefs and practices to aid dialogue. Sikh Individuals, Communities and Organisations

More information

GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES A (8062) EXAMPLE RESPONSES. Marked Responses Summer Sikhism

GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES A (8062) EXAMPLE RESPONSES. Marked Responses Summer Sikhism GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES A (8062) EXAMPLE RESPONSES Marked Responses Summer 2018 - Sikhism See a range of responses and how different levels are achieved and understand how to interpret the mark scheme.

More information

Name Form Group Teacher Room

Name Form Group Teacher Room Homework Due date Completed signed by parent/guardian Task 1 Task 2 Task 3 Task 4 Task 5 Task 6 Task 7 Task 8 Name Form Group Teacher Room Merits earned This page gives you tips on how to achieve the best

More information

World Religion Part II / 2014 (Alan Ream)

World Religion Part II / 2014 (Alan Ream) World Religion Part II / 2014 (Alan Ream) History Standard 6: Students know that religious and philosophical ideas have been powerful forces throughout history. What is the Essence of Hinduism, Buddhism,

More information

Mark Scheme (Results) Summer Pearson Edexcel GCE In Religious Studies 8RS0 Paper 4F Sikhism

Mark Scheme (Results) Summer Pearson Edexcel GCE In Religious Studies 8RS0 Paper 4F Sikhism Mark Scheme (Results) Summer 2017 Pearson Edexcel GCE In Religious Studies 8RS0 Paper 4F Sikhism Edexcel and BTEC Qualifications Edexcel and BTEC qualifications are awarded by Pearson, the UK s largest

More information

GCSE Religious Studies A. Mark Scheme for June Unit B582: Sikhism 2 (Worship, Community and Family, Sacred Writings)

GCSE Religious Studies A. Mark Scheme for June Unit B582: Sikhism 2 (Worship, Community and Family, Sacred Writings) GCSE Religious Studies A Unit B582: Sikhism 2 (Worship, Community and Family, Sacred Writings) General Certificate of Secondary Education Mark Scheme for June 2017 Oxford Cambridge and RSA Examinations

More information

GCE Religious Studies

GCE Religious Studies GCE Religious Studies RSS09 World Religions 1: Buddhism OR Hinduism OR Sikhism Report on the Examination 2060 June 2013 Version: 1.0 Further copies of this Report are available from aqa.org.uk Copyright

More information

A supernatural being worshipped as the creator and controller of the universe.

A supernatural being worshipped as the creator and controller of the universe. Year 7 and 8 Keywords and definitions: General: God: Atheist: Agnostic: Theist: Belief: Worship: Prayer: Pray: Faith: Charity: Equality: Forgiveness: Baptism: A supernatural being worshipped as the creator

More information

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW YEAR 1 & 2

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW YEAR 1 & 2 RE CURRICULUM OVERVIEW YEAR 1 & 2 Christianity - Christmas Celebrations How Christians celebrate Christmas. How do Christians celebrate the birth of Jesus? Belief in Jesus as special to God. Introduction

More information

Look Learn Understand & Respect. One Welcome and sharing are Sikhs make people welcome. Sikhs welcome everyone They worship in a Gurdwara

Look Learn Understand & Respect. One Welcome and sharing are Sikhs make people welcome. Sikhs welcome everyone They worship in a Gurdwara Sikhism About the topic In this topic pupils will learn about their Sikh sisters and brothers, how they live as a family and how they worship Where this topic fits in This topic will be taught discretely

More information

GCSE Religious Studies A. Mark Scheme for June Unit B582: Sikhism 2 (Worship, Community and Family, Sacred Writings)

GCSE Religious Studies A. Mark Scheme for June Unit B582: Sikhism 2 (Worship, Community and Family, Sacred Writings) GCSE Religious Studies A Unit B582: Sikhism 2 (Worship, Community and Family, Sacred Writings) General Certificate of Secondary Education Mark Scheme for June 2015 Oxford Cambridge and RSA Examinations

More information

South Asian Canadians

South Asian Canadians South Asian Canadians The number of people in Canada of South Asian origin, as defined by Statistics Canada, is growing considerably faster than the overall population. Between 1996 and 2001, for example,

More information

Christian, Sikh and non religious beliefs and teachings about protecting the planet.

Christian, Sikh and non religious beliefs and teachings about protecting the planet. Christian, Sikh and non religious beliefs and teachings about protecting the planet. Friday, 23 February 2018 Christian, Sikh and non religious beliefs and teachings about protecting the planet. L.O.

More information

Section 2 Religion: environmental and medical issues

Section 2 Religion: environmental and medical issues Unit 8 Religion and society: Sikhism Section 2 Religion: environmental and medical issues Topic 8.2.5 Sikhs and stewardship Although Sikhs do not always talk about being stewards of the Earth, they believe

More information

Comparative religion Morality and different religions

Comparative religion Morality and different religions Comparative religion Morality and different religions Christianity (Roman Catholics and Protestants) The word Catholic simply means embracing all. All Christians are Catholic, but those who recognise The

More information

SPRING. YEAR GROUP, TERM, UNIT TITLE, TIME ALLOCATION 156 Hours over 4 years (approximately 13 hours per term)

SPRING. YEAR GROUP, TERM, UNIT TITLE, TIME ALLOCATION 156 Hours over 4 years (approximately 13 hours per term) SPRING YEAR GROUP, This unit introduces Sikhism and what it means to belong to a religion. (6 hours) For time allocation see Hertfordshire page 6 AT1 (Level 3) Beliefs and teachings Develop religious and

More information

25% Area of Study: Area of Study: God. Central Concepts. The Nature of God God as Creator God s relationship with human life

25% Area of Study: Area of Study: God. Central Concepts. The Nature of God God as Creator God s relationship with human life Candidates are expected to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of beliefs, teachings and practices within a world faith. Reference to relevant sources of wisdom and authority are expected, including

More information

Importance of Vaisakhi Festival

Importance of Vaisakhi Festival Importance of Vaisakhi Festival 1 Why we celebrate Vaisakhi? Birthday of Khalsa Panth Why do we call it Vaisakhi? It is called Vaisakhi because it is the first day of the Desi month called Vaisakh which

More information

AS-LEVEL RELIGIOUS STUDIES

AS-LEVEL RELIGIOUS STUDIES AS-LEVEL RELIGIOUS STUDIES RSS09 World Religions 1: Buddhism OR Hinduism OR Sikhism Report on the Examination 2060 June 2015 Version: 0.1 Further copies of this Report are available from aqa.org.uk Copyright

More information

Agenda. What is Sikhism? Who are the Sikhs? Where do Sikhs Live? Basic Beliefs Articles of Faith About UNITED SIKHS References

Agenda. What is Sikhism? Who are the Sikhs? Where do Sikhs Live? Basic Beliefs Articles of Faith About UNITED SIKHS References Agenda What is Sikhism? Who are the Sikhs? Where do Sikhs Live? Basic Beliefs Articles of Faith About UNITED SIKHS References What is Sikhism? Religion founded in India (1469) by Guru Nanak and built upon

More information

Origins of Hinduism. Indian Society Divides

Origins of Hinduism. Indian Society Divides SECTION 2 Origins of Hinduism What You Will Learn Main Ideas 1. Indian society divided into distinct groups under the Aryans. 2. The Aryans practiced a religion known as Brahmanism. 3. Hinduism developed

More information

Religious Studies A GCSE (9 1)

Religious Studies A GCSE (9 1) Religious Studies A GCSE (9 1) Paper 2: Area of Study 2 Study of Second Religion Option 2C Islam Time: 50 minutes Instructions Use black ink or black ball-point pen. Answer all questions. Answer the questions

More information

Understanding India s Other Religions

Understanding India s Other Religions Understanding India s Other Religions (Buddhism, Sikhism, Jainism) Pearls of the Indian Ocean Windstar Cruises Ross Arnold, Fall 2017 Pearls of the Indian Ocean Lectures Introduction to Pearls of the Indian

More information

Buddhism. Introduction. Truths about the World SESSION 1. The First Noble Truth. Buddhism, 1 1. What are the basic beliefs of Buddhism?

Buddhism. Introduction. Truths about the World SESSION 1. The First Noble Truth. Buddhism, 1 1. What are the basic beliefs of Buddhism? Buddhism SESSION 1 What are the basic beliefs of Buddhism? Introduction Buddhism is one of the world s major religions, with its roots in Indian theology and spirituality. The origins of Buddhism date

More information

Pentagon Vaisakhi Celebration. May 1, 2015

Pentagon Vaisakhi Celebration. May 1, 2015 - Prepared remarks by Inni Kaur Pentagon Vaisakhi Celebration May 1, 2015 I d like to thank the Pentagon Chaplain and Chaplain Corps for gathering us here to commemorate Vaisakhi, a spring harvest festival

More information

Key Stage 3. Sikhism. Teacher Material. Author: Neil McKain Series Editor: Robert Orme

Key Stage 3. Sikhism. Teacher Material. Author: Neil McKain Series Editor: Robert Orme Key Stage 3 Sikhism Teacher Material Author: Neil McKain Series Editor: Robert Orme William Collins dream of knowledge for all began with the publication of his first book in 1819. A self-educated mill

More information

GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES A Paper 1A

GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES A Paper 1A GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES A Paper 1A Specimen 2018 Morning Time allowed: 1 hour 45 minutes Materials For this paper you must have: an AQA answer booklet. Instructions Use black ink or black ball-point pen.

More information

IK ONKAAR. The Sikh Religious Award Study Work Book For Grades (1-3) Youth. American Sikh Council

IK ONKAAR. The Sikh Religious Award Study Work Book For Grades (1-3) Youth. American Sikh Council IK ONKAAR The Sikh Religious Award Study Work Book For Grades (1-3) Youth American Sikh Council Formerly known as, World Sikh Council - America Region 1 The American Sikh Council Sikh Religious Award Book

More information

CURRICULUM MAP RE - KEYSTAGE 2

CURRICULUM MAP RE - KEYSTAGE 2 CURRICULUM MAP RE - KEYSTAGE 2 Minimum time allocation: 72 hours over two years (approximately 12 hours per term) this may include RE visits, visitors to RE lessons and RE curriculum days but does not

More information

Everyone Managing Religion in the Workplace Version 1

Everyone Managing Religion in the Workplace Version 1 Everyone Managing Religion in the Workplace Version 1 Owner: Diversity and Inclusion Approved by: Loraine Martins Date issued 16-04-2014 A Brief Guide for Managers 1. Introduction For many of our staff

More information

POSITION OF WOMEN IN SIKHISM

POSITION OF WOMEN IN SIKHISM KAAV INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ARTS,HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES POSITION OF WOMEN IN SIKHISM JASPREET KAUR Assistant Professor Khalsa College for Women Civil Lines, Ludhiana In Indian history, medivial

More information

Faith: Sikhism. Name of Unit: What Does It Mean To Be a Sikh? Recommended Year Group (if specified):

Faith: Sikhism. Name of Unit: What Does It Mean To Be a Sikh? Recommended Year Group (if specified): Name of Unit: What Does It Mean To Be a Sikh? Key Stage in which this unit should be taught: KS1 or KS2 Previous Learning: What do Sikhs believe? Previous unit AT1 Learning About Religion Main Focus: Practices

More information

Y8 Summer Exam Religious Studies Revision Booklet. (Condensed Version)

Y8 Summer Exam Religious Studies Revision Booklet. (Condensed Version) Y8 Summer Exam Religious Studies Revision Booklet (Condensed Version) Version 1 - May 2017 Exam Strategy 1 Mark Question Strategy No strategy required. This is a multi-choice question 2 Mark Question Strategy

More information

GCSE Religious Studies A. Mark Scheme for June Unit B582: Sikhism 2 (Worship, Community and Family, Sacred Writings)

GCSE Religious Studies A. Mark Scheme for June Unit B582: Sikhism 2 (Worship, Community and Family, Sacred Writings) GCSE Religious Studies A Unit B582: Sikhism 2 (Worship, Community and Family, Sacred Writings) General Certificate of Secondary Education Mark Scheme for June 2016 Oxford Cambridge and RSA Examinations

More information

Sewa Day PSHE/Citizenship lesson 1 Vocabulary cards

Sewa Day PSHE/Citizenship lesson 1 Vocabulary cards Sewa Day PSHE/Citizenship lesson 1 Vocabulary cards expectation caring service reward kindness selfless expectation caring service reward kindness selfless Sewa Day PSHE/Citizenship lesson 1 OPTIONAL World

More information

The Sikhs Their Beliefs and Practices

The Sikhs Their Beliefs and Practices The Sikhs Their Beliefs and Practices by Johan D.Tangelder. Canada is a nation of immigrants either immigrants or descendants of immigrants. But recent arrivals to its shores are no longer from European

More information

August Faith Policy. Approved by Trustees: August Consultation with Staff: September 2015

August Faith Policy. Approved by Trustees: August Consultation with Staff: September 2015 August 2015 Faith Policy Approved by Trustees: August 2015 Consultation with Staff: September 2015 Date for Review: September 2017 2 1 Introduction Akaal Primary School is a Sikh faith school established

More information

Use key words Interpret texts Plan and draw conclusions from a survey Summarise in paragraphs Write a play script and poetry

Use key words Interpret texts Plan and draw conclusions from a survey Summarise in paragraphs Write a play script and poetry Religious Studies Key Stage 3 Year 8 Spring Religion Outcomes Literacy Final Task Key Main RE skills Aspects of Level 5 attainment 3.Did Jesus save The world? 4. How should Martin Luther King be remembered?

More information

*X213/302* X213/302. RELIGIOUS, MORAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES HIGHER Paper 2

*X213/302* X213/302. RELIGIOUS, MORAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES HIGHER Paper 2 X213/302 NATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS 2008 WEDNESDAY, 28 MAY 3.05 PM 4.00 PM RELIGIOUS, MORAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES HIGHER Paper 2 You should answer either Section 1: Buddhism or Section 2: Christianity

More information

*X265/10/01* X265/10/01 RELIGIOUS, MORAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES INTERMEDIATE 1 NATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS PM 2.30 PM

*X265/10/01* X265/10/01 RELIGIOUS, MORAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES INTERMEDIATE 1 NATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS PM 2.30 PM X265/10/01 NATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS 2013 monday, 3 june 1.00 PM 2.30 PM RELIGIOUS, MORAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES INTERMEDIATE 1 There are three Sections in this paper. Section 1 World Religions This section

More information

R.E. Portfolio. What does RE look like at Forest Academy?

R.E. Portfolio. What does RE look like at Forest Academy? R.E. Portfolio What does RE look like at Forest Academy? Building Learning Powers R.E. at Forest Academy Religious Education curriculum aims to give children an engaging introduction to learning about

More information

Grade 8 Stand by Me CRITICAL OUTCOMES AND KEY CONCEPTS IN BOLD

Grade 8 Stand by Me CRITICAL OUTCOMES AND KEY CONCEPTS IN BOLD Grade 8 Stand by Me Theme 1: What do they expect of me now? - Identify and evaluate expectations that affect their behaviour - Retell the Pentecost story - Identify and describe the ways that the expectations

More information

Religious Studies Advanced Subsidiary Unit 1: Religious Studies Foundations

Religious Studies Advanced Subsidiary Unit 1: Religious Studies Foundations Edexcel GCE Religious Studies Advanced Subsidiary Unit 1: Religious Studies Foundations Tuesday 2 June 2009 Afternoon Time: 1 hour 45 minutes Paper Reference 6RS01/01 You must have: Answer Book (enclosed)

More information

Religious Studies. Advanced Subsidiary Unit 1: Religious Studies Foundations

Religious Studies. Advanced Subsidiary Unit 1: Religious Studies Foundations Pearson Edexcel GCE Religious Studies Advanced Subsidiary Unit 1: Religious Studies Foundations Thursday 18 May 2017 Morning Time: 1 hour 45 minutes Paper Reference 6RS01/01 You must have: Answer Book

More information

Human Rights Knowledge Organiser

Human Rights Knowledge Organiser Human Rights What are they? Human Rights Amnesty International Abuses Social Justice Oscar Romero Personal Conviction Malala Yousafzai 1) Human Rights The basic entitlement of all human beings. The United

More information

Origins. Indus River Valley. When? About 4000 years ago Where?

Origins. Indus River Valley. When? About 4000 years ago Where? Origins When? About 4000 years ago Where? What modern day countries make up where the Indus River Valley civilization once thrived? Indus River Valley Origins How? Who? It is widely believed that there

More information

Environmental Theology in Sikhism

Environmental Theology in Sikhism Environmental Theology in Sikhism "Creating the world, God has made it a place to practice spirituality" (Guru Granth Sahib, page 1035.) The Sikh scripture declares that the purpose of human beings is

More information

The Importance of Work and Service

The Importance of Work and Service Lesson Six The Importance of Work and Service Aims The aims of this lesson are to enable you to gain knowledge and understanding of o religious attitudes to the purpose and importance of work o work as

More information

Subject: Philosophy, Theology and Ethics

Subject: Philosophy, Theology and Ethics Subject: Philosophy, Theology and Ethics Year 7 1. Introduction to PTE Belief, fact, opinion Ultimate Questions Key Stage 3 2. Judaism Jewish beliefs and practices Stories from the Torah, including Moses

More information

Spirituality in India

Spirituality in India Spirituality in India Hinduism One of the oldest major religions. Polytheism: belief in many gods. Hindus do not eat beef. Fourth largest world religion. (Christianity 1, Islam 2, Buddhism 3) Hindu Facts

More information

The Sikh Community in Scouting

The Sikh Community in Scouting The Sikh Community in Scouting S Item Code FS185025 June 2008 Edition no 3 0845 300 1818 The Scout Method, which emphasises the importance of learning by example and from practical experience, is particularly

More information

WORLD HISTORY 8 CH 5.2 ORIGINS OF HINDUISM

WORLD HISTORY 8 CH 5.2 ORIGINS OF HINDUISM WORLD HISTORY 8 CH 5.2 ORIGINS OF HINDUISM 1. EXPLAIN THE ORIGINS OF INDIA S CLASS STRUCTURE. AS ARYAN SOCIETY BECAME MORE COMPLEX, THEIR SOCIETY BECAME DIVIDED INTO GROUPS BASE ON, FOR THE MOST PART,

More information

Diet Diet varies, and Buddhist may or may not be vegetarians. There are several days of fasting. On these days Buddhists do not eat after 12:00 noon.

Diet Diet varies, and Buddhist may or may not be vegetarians. There are several days of fasting. On these days Buddhists do not eat after 12:00 noon. Buddhist Residents About The Faith Buddhism is more a way of life than a religion, as it does not focus on ideas of a God or any other gods. This way of life is based on the teaching of Siddhartha Gautama,

More information

C H A P T E R XXV: HOW SHALL ATTAIN THE LORD, OH MASTER?

C H A P T E R XXV: HOW SHALL ATTAIN THE LORD, OH MASTER? C H A P T E R XXV: HOW SHALL ATTAIN THE LORD, OH MASTER? (A translation into English by Prof. JANAK RAJ Puri of 'Rag Gauri Purbi by GURU ARJUN DEV, from Granth Sahib.) How shall I attain the Lord, Oh Master?

More information

CLASSROOM SET DO NOT REMOVE Buddhism, Jainism, & Sikhism Documents

CLASSROOM SET DO NOT REMOVE Buddhism, Jainism, & Sikhism Documents Buddhism Document 1 Buddhism is a religion or philosophy founded in the 5th century BCE by Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, born a prince of the Shakya clan in northern India. Much controversy surrounds

More information

General Certificate of Education Advanced Subsidiary Examination June 2015

General Certificate of Education Advanced Subsidiary Examination June 2015 General Certificate of Education Advanced Subsidiary Examination June 2015 Religious Studies RSS09 Unit J World Religions 1: Buddhism OR Hinduism OR Sikhism Thursday 14 May 2015 9.00 am to 10.15 am For

More information

Wednesday, 10/4/17. We will begin our mini-unit on Religions from around the world. I will use an online presentation to complete a religions chart.

Wednesday, 10/4/17. We will begin our mini-unit on Religions from around the world. I will use an online presentation to complete a religions chart. Religions Wednesday, 10/4/17 We will begin our mini-unit on Religions from around the world. I will use an online presentation to complete a religions chart. By the end of the year, we Describe how people

More information

Hinduism. AP World History Chapter 6ab

Hinduism. AP World History Chapter 6ab Hinduism AP World History Chapter 6ab Origins Originates in India from literature, traditions, and class system of Aryan invaders Developed gradually; took on a variety of forms and gods particular to

More information

Definitions of Concepts

Definitions of Concepts Definitions of Concepts The Oxford English dictionary defines concepts as abstract ideas. It is helpful in religious education to identify concepts within three groupings; (as identified in Primary Religious

More information

Subject Overview 5 Year Curriculum pathway

Subject Overview 5 Year Curriculum pathway Subject Overview 5 Year Curriculum pathway Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 Scheme of work Scheme of work Scheme of work Scheme of work Scheme of work Believing in God Believing in God Believing in

More information

GCE MARKING SCHEME SUMMER 2016 RELIGIOUS STUDIES RS1/2 ER INTRODUCTION TO EASTERN RELIGIOUS 1346/01. WJEC CBAC Ltd.

GCE MARKING SCHEME SUMMER 2016 RELIGIOUS STUDIES RS1/2 ER INTRODUCTION TO EASTERN RELIGIOUS 1346/01. WJEC CBAC Ltd. GCE MARKING SCHEME SUMMER 2016 RELIGIOUS STUDIES RS1/2 ER INTRODUCTION TO EASTERN RELIGIOUS 1346/01 INTRODUCTION This marking scheme was used by WJEC for the 2016 examination. It was finalised after detailed

More information

SPECIMEN B603. Religious Studies B (Philosophy and/or Applied Ethics) Ethics 1 (Relationships, Medical Ethics, Poverty and Wealth) Specimen Paper

SPECIMEN B603. Religious Studies B (Philosophy and/or Applied Ethics) Ethics 1 (Relationships, Medical Ethics, Poverty and Wealth) Specimen Paper General Certificate of Secondary Education Religious Studies B (Philosophy and/or Applied Ethics) B603 Ethics 1 (Relationships, Medical Ethics, Poverty and Wealth) Specimen Paper Candidates answer on a

More information

Principal Aim. Attainment Targets. Religions and Beliefs. Fields of Enquiry. Programme of Study: KS1

Principal Aim. Attainment Targets. Religions and Beliefs. Fields of Enquiry. Programme of Study: KS1 Programme of Study: Principal Aim Attainment Targets Religions and Beliefs Fields of Enquiry Principal Aim of RE To engage pupils in enquiring into key questions arising from study of religion and belief,

More information

Subject - Curriculum Overview

Subject - Curriculum Overview Subject - Curriculum Overview Year Group Topic National Curriculum (For RE Surrey) Objectives 1 Aut 1 What makes a Church Identify one or more external different to other features of a local church, buildings?

More information

Sikh Traditions. Chapter Overview

Sikh Traditions. Chapter Overview 3 Sikh Traditions Chapter Overview Emerging in the western Indian state of Punjab, the Sikh religion is the youngest of the native Indian traditions. There are about 25 million Sikhs worldwide, with 5

More information

Paper J World Religions 1: Buddhism OR Hinduism OR Sikhism. Thursday 18 May 2017 Morning Time allowed: 1 hour 15 minutes

Paper J World Religions 1: Buddhism OR Hinduism OR Sikhism. Thursday 18 May 2017 Morning Time allowed: 1 hour 15 minutes AS RELIGIOUS STUDIES Paper J World Religions 1: Buddhism OR Hinduism OR Sikhism Thursday 18 May 2017 Morning Time allowed: 1 hour 15 minutes Materials For this paper you must have: an AQA 8-page answer

More information

Preparation Read over the sections on Worldview, Religious terms and Answering Questions and Objections. Become familiar with these so that you are

Preparation Read over the sections on Worldview, Religious terms and Answering Questions and Objections. Become familiar with these so that you are Sikhism Sikhism Sikhism is the youngest world religion, dating back only as far as the 15th century. It split from Hinduism when founder Guru Nanak received a vision he believed was from God, charging

More information

Year 9: Be With Me (We are Strong Together: CCCB)

Year 9: Be With Me (We are Strong Together: CCCB) Year 9: Be With Me (We are Strong Together: CCCB) Outcomes by Units and Themes Cognitive Unit 1: Be With Me Know that they have been created with the freedom to shape their own relationships Know how the

More information

Paper Reference(s) 4425/02 London Examinations IGCSE. Paper 2 The Religious Community. Thursday 13 November 2008 Morning Time: 1 hour

Paper Reference(s) 4425/02 London Examinations IGCSE. Paper 2 The Religious Community. Thursday 13 November 2008 Morning Time: 1 hour Paper Reference(s) 4425/02 London Examinations IGCSE Religious Studies Paper 2 The Religious Community Thursday 13 November 2008 Morning Time: 1 hour Materials required for examination Answer book (AB08)

More information

Subject: Religious. Education Scheme of Work: (Year 7) Term: Autumn/Spring/Summer

Subject: Religious. Education Scheme of Work: (Year 7) Term: Autumn/Spring/Summer Subject: Religious Education Scheme of Work: (Year 7) Term: Autumn/Spring/Summer Topic / Unit(s) How do contemporary images reflect the beliefs, practices and values of faith communities? Overview / Context

More information

*X213/201* X213/201 RELIGIOUS, MORAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES INTERMEDIATE 2. There are four Sections in this paper.

*X213/201* X213/201 RELIGIOUS, MORAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES INTERMEDIATE 2. There are four Sections in this paper. X213/201 NATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS 2008 WEDNESDAY, 28 MAY 9.00 AM 11.00 AM RELIGIOUS, MORAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES INTERMEDIATE 2 There are four Sections in this paper. Section 1 World Religions: This

More information

NEWHAM BRIDGE PRIMARY SCHOOL FOUNDATION SUBJECTS CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT R.E.

NEWHAM BRIDGE PRIMARY SCHOOL FOUNDATION SUBJECTS CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT R.E. NEWHAM BRIDGE PRIMARY SCHOOL FOUNDATION SUBJECTS CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT R.E. Y1 R.E. Curriculum Y1 R.E A.R.E Retell stories Jesus and Moses that led people to follow them. Describe in simple

More information

Curriculum Guidance. Religious Education Curriculum

Curriculum Guidance. Religious Education Curriculum Curriculum Guidance Religious Education Curriculum Curriculum guidance for years 1 to 6, including learning objectives and whole school curriculum map. Learning Objectives These are the learning objectives

More information

DADA DIVINE WAY OF LIVING

DADA DIVINE WAY OF LIVING DADA DIVINE WAY OF LIVING SUMMARY Verse 1. Our Creator, our God, is whoever or whatever we think and believe it to be based on our intellectual status. Our thoughts and beliefs are as good as any other

More information

Mark Scheme (Results) Summer 2010

Mark Scheme (Results) Summer 2010 Mark Scheme (Results) GCSE GCSE Religious Studies 5RS01 Edexcel Limited. Registered in England and Wales No. 4496750 Registered Office: One90 High Holborn, London WC1V 7BH Edexcel is one of the leading

More information

GCSE Religious Studies A: (World Religion(s)) Mark Scheme for June Unit B581: Sikhism 1 (Beliefs, Special Days, Divisions and Interpretations)

GCSE Religious Studies A: (World Religion(s)) Mark Scheme for June Unit B581: Sikhism 1 (Beliefs, Special Days, Divisions and Interpretations) GCSE Religious Studies A: (World Religion(s)) Unit B581: Sikhism 1 (Beliefs, Special Days, Divisions and Interpretations) General Certificate of Secondary Education Mark Scheme for June 2014 Oxford Cambridge

More information

Cross-curricular links, especially opportunities for Literacy, Numeracy and ICT within teaching: Computing: Literacy: Writing Opportunities:

Cross-curricular links, especially opportunities for Literacy, Numeracy and ICT within teaching: Computing: Literacy: Writing Opportunities: Key Skills to be covered: Taken from Level 3 Taken from Level 4 I can show what I know about religious beliefs, ideas and teachings. I can show what I know about: Religious objects and how they are used

More information

Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Shintoism, & the Philosophy of Confucianism

Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Shintoism, & the Philosophy of Confucianism Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Shintoism, & the Philosophy of Confucianism This is a group of people who share a common culture and have a similar language. These characteristics have been part of their community

More information

World Religions. Religious Studies T. Nixon. Most content sourced from:

World Religions. Religious Studies T. Nixon. Most content sourced from: World Religions Religious Studies T. Nixon Most content sourced from: http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/religion/ Christianity Christianity The largest religion in the world Over 2 billion followers 42 million

More information

Your web browser (Safari 7) is out of date. For more security, comfort and the best experience on this site: Update your browser Ignore

Your web browser (Safari 7) is out of date. For more security, comfort and the best experience on this site: Update your browser Ignore Your web browser (Safari 7) is out of date. For more security, comfort and the best experience on this site: Update your browser Ignore Educator Version DASTA ARS Turbans are a fundamental part of Sikh

More information

I Can Attainment Statements from Non Statutory Framework merged to REC curriculum framework

I Can Attainment Statements from Non Statutory Framework merged to REC curriculum framework Level Step 1 Step 2 End of Key stage 1 expecta tions Know and Understand a range of religions and worldviews so they can: Describe explain analyse, investigate and enquire, respond, appreciate and appraise

More information

The Six Paramitas (Perfections)

The Six Paramitas (Perfections) The Sanskrit word paramita means to cross over to the other shore. Paramita may also be translated as perfection, perfect realization, or reaching beyond limitation. Through the practice of these six paramitas,

More information

Markscheme May 2017 World religions Standard level Paper 1

Markscheme May 2017 World religions Standard level Paper 1 M17/3/WLDRE/SP1/ENG/TZ0/XX/M Markscheme May 2017 World religions Standard level Paper 1 14 pages 2 M17/3/WLDRE/SP1/ENG/TZ0/XX/M This markscheme is confidential and for the exclusive use of examiners in

More information