The Kansas Mason. of the Brotherhood. T h e V o i c e o f K a n s a s M a s o n r y

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1 T h e V o i c e o f K a n s a s M a s o n r y The Kansas Mason Volume 52 Issue 4 Winter 2014 A Publication of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Kansas Investing in Growth of the Brotherhood

2 delivering the message FROM THE GRAND EAST Michael A. Halleran, Grand Master of Masons Summer allows us to review and reflect upon the designs laid upon the trestle-board. As this edition of the Kansas Mason goes to press, lodges throughout the state have returned to their labors and once again the work of the Craft begins in earnest. But just as many lodges remain at labor over the summer due to the amount of work in waiting. the Grand Lodge and your grand officers have been equally engaged over the summer months with more activity on the horizon in the autumn. Since last I wrote to you, I have been to many lodges throughout the state, conducting surprise visits when my schedule has allowed it, and presiding at emblem presentations, with many distinguished and longserving brethren. A couple of other highlights of the busy summer include two conferences that enabled us to showcase Kansas Masonry. In July I was invited to attend the Rocky Mountain Masonic Conference in Reno, Nevada as the keynote speaker. I spoke to the assembled delegates from ten states about the changes we have undertaken in Kansas Masonry. I highlighted the continuity that has been a part of the Grand Lodge officer line since 2010 something that many jurisdictions do not practice as well as our strategic plan, and the progress we have made in overhauling Grand Lodge programs in response to our member s needs and desires. The response was overwhelmingly positive, with many jurisdictions requesting more information about our programs and direction. Although that may have just been polite conversation following the presentation, I think the real proof that we are going in the right direction can be seen by the upcoming visits to Kansas by some of the participants. Two attendees at that conference will be visiting us soon: the Grand Master of New Mexico plans to attend our Leadership Academy, and the Grand Master of Utah plans to join us at our Annual Communication. To me, this indicates that we are leading by example, and I have high hopes that our progress and positive energy will continue. The Grand Lodge officers have been equally busy. In August a delegation of our officers attended the Midwest Conference of Grand Lodges in Madison, Wisconsin. Led by Deputy Grand Master Daren Kellerman, and including Grand Secretary Tracy Bloom, Area Deputy Grand Master Tony Borum, Grand Sword Bearer Dale Morrow, and Assistant 2 THE KANSAS MASON Kansas Masonic Foundation, 2909 SW Maupin Lane, Topeka, Kansas 66614

3 Sometimes in life, we are tempted to hide our light under a bushel basket, but Masonically we are taught to spread light, not hide it. Grand Tyler Perry Cross, the Kansas delegation wowed the conference, presenting the same program I presented in Reno, and getting the same positive response. At the beginning of the year, we told you that we believed Kansas was leading the way in Masonry in North America, and the response that we received from each of these conferences confirmed our belief that we are indeed re-energizing and improving the Masonic experience for our members. Every chance we get, your Grand Lodge Officers are eager to lay out our strategic plan to our members, lodges, and even to other grand jurisdictions, to show what can be accomplished by planning, goal-setting and concerted action. But you needn t take my word for it. You can see your Grand Lodge officers for yourself by attending the next Area meeting. Check the Grand Lodge calendar online to find one near you. I promise you it will be time well spent, and I have no doubt that when you leave, you will be fired up about Masonry in Kansas. Sometimes in life, we are tempted to hide our light under a bushel basket, but Masonically we are taught to spread light, not hide it. This has been the motivation for Grand Lodge officers and the Grand Master to share our experience and accomplishments with other jurisdictions. For just as we put our good ideas out there, we also receive good ideas from other Grand Lodges, as well as lessons on what not to do. If Masonry is going to fully turn the corner into the twenty-first century, communication beyond our borders is critical. On other fronts, your Grand Lodge is hard at work planning some exciting upcoming events. As you are aware, earlier this year we formally retired the old Friends of Masons program that had served lodges in Kansas for many years. I am pleased to announce that work began this the summer on a replacement. Our new Membership Development Program is in production now, and I am very excited about it. With the assistance of Grand Secretary Tracy Bloom, Executive Director of the Kansas Masonic Foundation Bob Shively, and Assistant Grand Tyler Perry Cross, we are in the final draft stages now. When complete, this tool will enable lodges to educate the public and potential members about our Order, show lodges how to host a successful event that creates a powerful first impression, and help identify potential members who are likely to be a good fit in Blue Lodge. Underscoring our new commitment to quality men over quantity of men, I FREEMASONRY Follow Grand Lodge of Kansas and Kansas Masonic Foundation on FACEBOOK predict this new membership development program will be another Kansas product that other Grand jurisdictions will want to see. And we ll be happy to show it to them. Before closing, I must mention two upcoming events to keep in mind and prepare for; the Leadership Academy on November 1 and the District Schools of Instruction that will be held as scheduled at a lodge near you. We find our lodges that attend and participate in these events come away invigorated and on fire about Masonry. Please make it a point to attend. Until then, Brethren, I bring you greetings from the Grand East and I look forward to meeting you on the level. WINTER

4 GRAND SECRETARY by M.W. Tracy L. Bloom, PGM, Grand Secretary The Importance of Paying Your Lodge Dues In a Timely Manner As we head into the dues billing months, I d like to mention a few things as reminders for all members. This is a very important time and an essential function of your Lodge; it s when your Lodge collects the funds necessary to run the operations for the coming year, and is counting on you, as a member, to pay your dues in a timely manner. Lodge dues are payable in advance; in other words, your Lodge dues for 2015 are payable to your Lodge by December 31, I would hope that none of you would wait that long to pay your Lodge dues, unless necessity dictates, and in which case, it would be considerate of you to let your Master or Secretary know that you might need a little extra time to make that payment. Your Lodge is counting on your timely payment to effectively operate and pay the necessary bills to keep the doors open, so your members can continue to meet as Brothers and share in that all valuable Masonic experience. I urge you; as soon as you receive your notice of dues take care of it as quickly as possible. I know your Secretary and Lodge brothers will appreciate it. Each year, Lodge Secretaries spend a lot of time trying to collect dues, and more especially those that LODGE DUES ARE PAYABLE IN ADVANCE, IN OTHER WORDS, YOUR LODGE DUES FOR 2015 ARE PAYABLE TO YOUR LODGE BY DECEMBER 31, are past due, because those require multiple mailings and perhaps even a few phone calls. Unfortunately, each year, there are as many Masons suspended for non-payment of dues as there are losses to deaths. The latter we can t do much about, but the former we can. I am encouraging your Lodge Secretary to push hard this year to educate members about the importance of the timely payment of dues, and to not put it off. Many times we lose track of members because of address changes or moves. In today s society, and the ease in which we communicate you wouldn t think we d lose track of anyone, but believe me, it s a challenge. When we send out the Kansas Mason, we have the entire mailing list checked against a database that alerts us to changes of addresses, otherwise we d have no idea that some of you have moved, and still we ll have between two to three hundred magazines returned, unable to deliver or forward. We hate to lose anyone as a member of our fraternity, but more especially someone who we lose track of for various reasons. So please, if you move, let your Lodge Secretary know. Send him an , send him a text, call him, send him a letter, call the Grand Lodge Office, and just let us know please! While we are talking about the possibility of suspension of members for non-payment of dues, I d like to touch on dual memberships (a member of a Lodge in this jurisdiction, and also another jurisdiction) and plural memberships (a member of more than one Kansas Lodge). If you become suspended for any reason, including non-payment of dues, you will be suspended in the other Lodge as well, no matter which Lodge you first become suspended in. (By- Law 4-401A, 4-401D) When you take on the responsibility of membership in more than one Lodge, you must maintain your dues payments in all of them. If you no longer care to be a member of one of the Lodges, notify the secretary you d like to dimit. Don t assume that not paying your dues will remove you from that Lodge properly, it won t. As a matter of fact, it will remove you from both Lodges as a suspended member. Also, most Lodge Secretaries only send out the new dues cards after payment is received. So, if you have not paid your dues by December 31, of each calendar year, your Lodge membership is in jeopardy of suspension. It is easy to tell if you are current or not, just look at your dues card; on it it will say (your name) is a member in good standing until December 31, (year). If the year indicated is not at least the current year, your membership is not in good standing. Should the Master of your Lodge direct the Tyler continued on page 7 4 THE KANSAS MASON

5 INSIDE THIS ISSUE FEATURED ARTICLES FROM THE GRAND EAST 2 Delivering The Message GRAND LODGE 13 Lodge Treasurers Let s Get Organized! 17 Grand Master s C2A Class Sets a High Standard 18 Robert L. Tomlinson, Jr., PGM Resigns 19 New District School Format Crosses Kansas FEATURE ARTICLE 8 Investing in Growth of the Brotherhood 20 From Whence We Came... DEPARTMENTS 4 GRAND SECRETARY The Importance of Paying Your Lodge Dues In a Timely Manner 6 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 22 FROM THE ARCHIVES Kansas Masonic Foundation Takes First Step In Preserving Kansas Masonic History 23 MEMBER INTERVIEW Rob McClarty 24 AROUND THE WORLD Midwest Conference of Grand Lodges Far Exceeds Expectations Fraternal Secrets 26 MAKING A DIFFERENCE KMF Band Camp Roars On Towards 40 Planing Your Estate Now Makes Sense Annual Freemason s Auctions Add New Gems To Annual Communication's Crown A Great New Way To Give Kansas Mason Raises $8,500+ for Kansas Masonic Foundation It s Always Auction Time At The KMF! 35 LODGE OF RESEARCH Examining the Working Tools 39 HOME WARMINGS Celebrating Our Accomplishments Along the Way Kansas Department of Commerce TAX CREDIT Program Kansas Masonic Home Award Winners! 42 BOOK REVIEW The Bridge Builder s Guide 43 OUT AND ABOUT 48 EVENTS CALENDAR 49 ASKED AND ANSWERED WINTER

6 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR I read with interest the article last issue concerning Band Camp and the surprisingly positive experience the high school students involved get out of that time-honored event. Our Lodge has sponsored some students in the past but has not done so now for some time. Is this something we should still be doing? Is there a real need for more sponsors? In a word, yes! This year s Band Camp, which marked its 31st year, was a tremendous success, with 178 high school students playing in the Band. This is probably one of the best Kansas Masonic Lodge community activities, when it comes to creating a lot of visibility and garnering a lot of fresh public support. As a matter of fact, the Band Camp press releases developed and broadcast this year by the Kansas Masonic Foundation, along with the ones we sent to students to put in their local newspapers, were more widely published than ever before resulting in great PR for the Lodges and Kansas Masons. So there has really never been a better time to fully support Band Camp than there is right now. This year, we had 133 Kansas Masonic Lodges sponsor one or more students to Band Camp. But we could have easily handled almost 50 more students this year, if the Lodge sponsorship had been there. So to once again directly answer your questions in a single word: yes. We could definitely have used your Lodge s support this year and will continue to need it in the future. So please plan now to sponsor at least one band student for the 32nd year of the Kansas Masonic All-State Marching Band Camp, which will take place at Fort Hays State University in Hays, Kansas, during the last week of July, I recently had the opportunity to attend one of the Kansas Masonic Foundation s Statewide Seminars, and the presentation could aptly be compared to finding a Masonic gold mine and not just where the raising of funds is concerned. It is amazing that more Lodges did not send representatives to learn more about Fundraising and Public Relations for their Lodges. The overview of KMF programs and how they can be utilized by our Lodges was another very informative aspect of those seminars. Thank you very much for putting those on in our area! Can you tell that I m happy to have gone? The ten seminars conducted across the State starting in mid-june received great reviews from all who were there, and we share your amazement that they weren t better attended. But for those who missed that unique and valuable opportunity, KMF plans to continue the education process in the important areas in which Lodges are most in need of further education and resources. A Seminar will be presented during the Leadership Academy, for instance, and another may possibly be offered during the Annual Communications in March, should there be sufficient interest and room available on the premises. And in all likelihood, KMF personnel will go on to develop presentations on other topics, continuing this type of education on into the future. We were pleased to have had the opportunity to present this seminar to continued on page 7 If you have any questions that you would like addressed on Masonry, Grand Lodge, Kansas Masonic Foundation, Kansas Masonic Home, this publication or its articles, please send your questions to or mail to Kansas Masonic Foundation, Attn. Kansas Mason Editor, 2909 SW Maupin Lane, Topeka, Kansas The Kansas Mason Established 1963 The Kansas Mason is the official publication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free & Accepted Masons of Kansas, formally organized March 17, The Kansas Mason is published quarterly (2/1; 5/1; 8/1; 11/1) at the direction of the Council of Administration from the offices of: The Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Kansas 320 SW 8th Avenue Topeka, Kansas, The opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Kansas, its officers or employees. SUBMIT ARTICLES: by to or mail to KMF Editorial 2909 SW Maupin Lane Topeka, KS, All submissions may be in electronic format or hard copy and become the property of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Kansas. Photos may be submitted through Flickr at No compensation is allowed or intended for any articles, photographs, or other material submitted or published. NOTE: Permission to reprint material appearing in The Kansas Mason will be granted upon written request to the Grand Secretary from recognized Master Masons. Other written requests will be considered by the Council of Administration. When reprinted, articles should note Reprinted with permission of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. (month and year) by the MW Grand Lodge A.F.& A.M. of Kansas. All rights reserved. The Grand Lodge seal and the logos Kansas Mason, and Kansas Freemasons/On The Level are trademarks of the MW Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Kansas, and all rights are reserved. 6 THE KANSAS MASON

7 GRAND SECRETARY continued from page 4 or any other Lodge officer to not admit members who don t have a current dues card, you might be barred from attending Lodge meetings until your dues are paid in full. Likewise, should you attend another organizations tyled meeting that predicates its membership upon you being a Mason, they should also refuse you entrance into the meeting without proof of a current Lodge dues card. According to the by-laws of the Grand Lodge of Kansas, the Master of your Lodge also has some very important responsibilities concerning your membership. He is responsible for making sure that there is a concerted effort made to determine your disposition prior to suspension A. Lodge Dues Notice to Delinquent Members Not later than the first Stated Communication in October, prior to the Annual Communication of the Lodge, the Master will obtain from the Secretary, a list of delinquent members. The Master will contact each delinquent member, preferably in person, and encourage him to remit his dues and further explain the adverse effects that being suspended will cause. It shall further be the inherent duty of the Master to inquire into the reason(s) the delinquent brother will not or cannot remit his dues. A determination will then be made to see if the reasons or inabilities to pay said dues falls within the realms of By-Law 4-307, Remission of Dues. (Adopted 1991) If suspended for non-payment of dues, all is not lost! To reinstate your membership, from January 1, until June 30, immediately following your suspension, you may simply pay all indebtedness to your Lodge (including the current year s dues). Beginning July 1, you will need to petition for restoration. And as a note; all petitions are treated the same; it must be filled out in full including references and recommenders, read and received at either a stated or special communication, investigating committee assigned and not less than two weeks later it may be balloted upon at a stated meeting. Becoming suspended for non-payment of dues runs the risk of having to passing the ballot box once again. Granted, in most cases this is not an issue, but there have been some where the petitioner did not pass the ballot box, and therefore was not restored. And by the way, you must restore your membership in the Lodge in which you were suspended. This is a busy time for secretaries, reviewing their rosters and filling out and ordering their dues cards, preparing a list of members in jeopardy of losing their membership and coordinating that with the Master of the Lodge, sending out dues reminder notices for delinquent dues, preparing dues notices for the coming year, 2015, taking care of dues payments, accounting for the money and turning it over to the Treasurer. On top of all that he will be preparing a final list for the Master to address delinquent members for the first or annual meeting in December, entering new Lodge officers, and on top of all that, getting ready to complete the annual report. The secretaries, (despite the title of this article), of the several Lodges in Kansas are a hard working bunch of Brothers dedicated to your Lodge and the success of it. To my estimation, they are probably underappreciated, at times overworked, and would probably refuse offers of help, but would relish in the fact that their Lodge brothers gave them a pat on the back and a big At-a-Boy! as appreciation for all they do. Please don t make them chase you down for something you should be taking the personal responsibility for doing in the first place! Please pay your dues on time, Thanks! LETTERS TO THE EDITOR continued from page 6 more than 100 Brothers across the State and hope that participation and interest in our future offerings will continue to grow. I heard that new Master Masons are receiving a complimentary voucher, allowing them to attend either the 4th Annual Leadership Academy on Saturday, November 1st of this year, or the 159th Annual Communication from March 19-21, 2015 for free. Can that be true? Yes, it is. The Kansas Masonic Foundation, in cooperation with the Grand Lodge, is now providing the opportunity for all new Master Masons in Kansas to attend either the 4th Annual Leadership Academy or the 159th Annual Communication completely free of charge. The rationale behind this program is to help our newly raised Brothers learn more about Kansas Freemasonry and begin their journey for More Light sooner than their circumstances might otherwise allow. We believe this program will further engage our new Brothers and broaden their Masonic horizons by exposing them to the exciting possibilities Masonry has to offer in ways that they may well not always be as quick to experience, if they simply stick to what happens in their Home Lodge alone. WINTER

8 KANSAS MASONS RESEARCH PROJECT GRAND LODGE Growth Investing in of the Brotherhood Steady membership declines threaten the sustainability of fraternal organizations nationwide. The Kansas Masonic Foundation, in cooperation with the Grand Lodge of Kansas, undertook a comprehensive research project in the summer of 2014 to address this trend and identify strategies to re-energize Kansas Masonic organizations. By Robert A. Shively, CAE, Executive Director Kansas Masonic Foundation To develop a blueprint that reverses membership declines and reinvigorates the Brotherhood, three types of information were needed. This included 1) the public s perceptions of Kansas Masons, 2) the priorities, behavior and commitments of active Masons, and 3) insights from dropped members that relate motivations to both join and leave the Order. This information was captured in three distinct surveys with different objectives and methodologies. Each survey provided unique perspectives. Combined, the three research studies reveal marketing and policy approaches that can promote recruitment, retention, and growth of Kansas Masonic organizations. The study was conducted by Q&A Research with offices in Overland Park, Kansas, and the Bay area in California. GENERAL POPULATION SURVEY: PUBLIC PERCEPTIONS OF KANSAS MASONS Public opinion and awareness of Kansas Masons are key factors in determining the environment for recruitment. In a broad sense, Masons compete with many other organizations for time and citizen commitment. These groups may be fraternal organizations (Elks and Lions) as well as other civic organizations that provide community services. Q&A Research conducted an online survey consisting of its Kansas panelists. Eight hundred respondents completed surveys which were then weighted for gender, age, and income to approximate Kansas demographics. To qualify for the survey, respondents needed to be 21 years of age, a resident of Kansas, and heard of the Masons. Also they could not be the spouse or a current member of the Masons, Shriners, or The Order of the Eastern Star. The margin of error for the General Population survey was 3.5 percent.* Awareness of the Masonic Order Respondents were asked to identify and assess service organizations that actively *Margins of error at the 95 percent confidence level were calculated for each of the three research studies. In the case of the General Population survey if all Kansans were asked to respond to the survey, the results for any one question might differ as much as 3.5 percent from the original survey results. 8 THE KANSAS MASON Kansas Masonic Foundation, 2909 SW Maupin Lane, Topeka, Kansas 66614

9 contributed to Kansans. This question used an unaided format. In other words, respondents were asked to identify groups off the top of their heads with no written listing of organizations. The top three organizations named were American Red Cross (15%), United Way (12%) and Salvation Army (12%). Three percent of respondents identified Masons. In the follow-up question respondents were given a list of organizations and asked how familiar they were with the groups. Panelists rated their awareness on a numeric scale with 1 representing not too familiar and 5 indicating very familiar. As the chart above indicates, 11 percent had a high familiarity with Masons (4 or 5 score) trailing the Shriners, and Lions, and tied with the Rotary Club. Interestingly, many respondents familiar with the Shriners were not aware that Shriners membership was only available to Masons. Is the public awareness level of the Masons disappointing? Certainly there TOTAL AWARENESS OF ORGANIZATION Shriners 93%* (n=781) 18% Lions Club 87% (n=741) 14% Rotary Club 86%* (n=736) 11% Masons 78%* (n=800) 11% Elks 74%* (n=654) 6% Optimist Club 71%* (n=536) 7% The Order of the Eastern Star 38%* (n=297) 15% None of these 3%* N/A is a correlation between low organizational awareness and significant declines in membership. However, the high unaided FAMILIARITY WITH ORGANIZATION (4 OR 5 RATING) awareness of other service groups can be partially explained. These groups promote themselves through national commercials and workplace presence (Red Cross and United Way) or their physical visibility such as Salvation Army bell ringers during the Christmas season. The fact that Masons have a lower awareness ranking than Shriners may be attributed to that organization s sponsorship of a post-season college football game and their high visibility in parades. The high familiarity rating of the Masons approximated and sometimes exceeded the ranking of wellestablished service organizations. Perception of Kansas Masons When asked for their impression of the Masons as a service organization, 55 percent of respondents had neither a positive nor negative impression. A follow-up question indicated that this neutral impression was related to not knowing much about the organization rather than possessing awareness, but having no strong opinions. Positive impressions of the Kansas Masons, cited by 33% of the respondents, were linked to high regard for the organization s charitable work and awareness of a friend or family member who belonged to the Masons. The solid reputation of the organization also was a factor leading to a positive impression. Only 11 percent of the sample offered a negative impression. This attitude was attributed to a perception about secrecy and that Masonic beliefs, ideals, and cultist image were incompatible with the respondent s ideals. Do the combined positive and neutral perceptions of Masons translate to recruitment opportunities? Fourteen percent of male respondents would consider becoming a member and 32 percent replied that they were unsure. Fifty-six percent of respondents were FALL

10 KANSAS MASONS RESEARCH PROJECT GRAND LODGE most likely to indicate that the Masons "need to educate the public on their purpose." Respondents most associated the words "brotherhood", "trust" and "integrity" with the organization. To be eligible to complete the survey, participants must have at least heard of the Masons. Even with 231 Lodges throughout Kansas, 62 percent of respondents were not sure if there was a Masonic Lodge in their community. Two-thirds (66 percent) of respondents were not able to assess whether Masons contributed more to their community compared to other organizations such as Rotary, Elks, Lions, and Optimists. Sixty percent of the panel did not know anyone who is, or used to be a Mason. Twenty-four (24) percent of respondents indicated that a friend/neighbor is or was a Mason while 19 percent indicated a family member affiliation with a Mason. The most often mentioned relative who had a Masonic membership was grandfather. ACTIVE MEMBER SURVEY Information from the General Population policy preferences of Kansas Masons, a survey was mailed to 3,311 members. From that mailing, 426 surveys were returned, resulting in a response rate of 13 percent. The completed surveys provide a margin of error of plus or minus 6.9 percent. The 426 responses were segmented by engaged leaders. This refers to those Masons who had been in either a Grand Lodge leadership position or attended a Grand Lodge event (Annual Communications or Leadership Academy) within last 3 years. The remaining respondents are referred to as other members. Profile and Perceptions of Active Kansas Masons Most Masons were preceded in the Order by one or more family members. Eighty-one percent of engaged leaders indicated that a family member had been a Mason at one time compared to 76 percent of other members that had a family link. A large majority of Masons (98 percent engaged leaders and 90 percent other members) indicated they perceived themselves as better men because of their Masonic membership. The issue of declining membership as a major problem had a broad consensus with 93 percent of engaged leaders and 89 percent of other members sharing this perception. In open-ended questions, members were asked for concerns about their Lodge and the Grand Lodge of Kansas. Declining membership and lack of new members were frequent comments in both instances. Both engaged members and other members were highly supportive of Kansas Masons offering more family activities. Additional ideas for increasing membership were not lacking. Frequent responses in open-ended questions included: Increase visibility by participating in the community Greater advertising and publicity Increase appeal to younger men Sponsor youth activities and sports Embrace the social media Educate people more about the Masons and provide tools for members to communicate Be less restrictive and adapt to modern times survey can identify the most effective ways to market the Kansas Masons based on residents perceptions, leveraging positive impressions, and countering misconceptions held by some in the population. But the precise direction of future strategies and actions will be generated from the 231 Lodges in Kansas. To evaluate the passions, priorities, and ENGAGED LEADERS OTHER MEMBERS Have been a top-line signer for a new member 43% 8% Attend Masonic Lodge events 10 or more times annually Find their membership fulfilling Belong to only one Lodge in Kansas Belong to two Lodges in Kansas 26 7 The Grand Lodge represents the Craft in Kansas well THE KANSAS MASON

11 More effective recruitment by active members was also prominently mentioned. How aggressive is the Brotherhood in promoting the Order to non-masons friends? In the past two years, engaged leaders had discussed their membership in Freemasonry with the intent of interesting non-members to join an average of 10 times. For other members the average was 3.3. It should be no surprise that gaps exist between leaders and rank-and-file members in areas of involvement, policies, and perceived value of the organization. But when this gap is substantial, it may indicate an unshared vision of the Masonic mission among the membership. The chart below illustrates where major differences exist between engaged leaders and other members. What did respondents value most about being a Mason? The most frequent considerations were identical between engaged and other members. The first of these unaided responses was fellowship/brotherhood and fraternity, which was mentioned nearly twice as often as the second highest, moral principles, philosophy, and values. These membership aspects were followed by social interaction and willingness to help brothers and charitable work/ community service. Other considerations included being around like-minded people, and rituals/degree work. Active Masons also had the opportunity to provide open-ended feedback regarding their Lodge. Membership concerns mentioned most were declining membership and lack of new/younger members followed by apathy and low participation of their fellow Masons. Financial issues also was a highly ranked concern. Concerns about the Grand Lodge of Kansas also elicited comments similar to those identified with their own Lodge. Disconnect between the Grand Lodge of Kansas and local Lodges was also a frequent comment followed by financial issues. A follow-up question asked respondents to suggest how the Grand Lodge could improve their representation of the Craft in Kansas. The two most popular responses were increase familiarity and listen more to local Lodges, and promote greater visibility for local programs and charitable work. DROPPED MEMBER SURVEYS Members who leave an organization are often an excellent source to pinpoint issues that discourage continued affiliation. Surveys were mailed to 1,802 former Masons who allowed their Masonic affiliation to lapse within the past five years. Response rates for dropped member surveys are notoriously low because the sample includes those who have no interest in further contact with the organization. The return rate for this survey was only six percent, totaling 108 surveys. The margin of error was plus or minus 9.8 percent. In key areas, dropped member responses are close to active member feedback. This includes the average member profile, perspectives about membership values, top WINTER

12 KANSAS MASONS RESEARCH PROJECT GRAND LODGE concerns about their local Lodge and the Kansas Grand Lodge, and ways to remedy problems. Ironically, the attendance at Lodge meetings was substantially higher for dropped members than active other members. Thirty-nine percent of dropped members indicated that would be willing to rejoin the Order within two years if they had the opportunity. The top reasons given for not renewing membership was that the member had moved away, could no longer afford dues, and poor communications from the local Lodge. A few members voiced concern about having to start over again, if they joined a new Lodge. THE WAY FORWARD What information gathered from the three studies can be translated to action plans that grow and energize Kansas Masonic organizations? Masons are different from other fraternal or civic organizations. The Order has a 400-year history, study required, a strong system of rituals, a doctrine of beliefs, and generational ties. Commitment to Masonry is not an impulse decision. In a society that honors transparency more than privacy, the degree of secrecy required of Masons becomes suspect. Importance of Family Traditions as a Growth Strategy Nearly all civic and fraternal organizations experienced membership declines in the past 30 or 40 years. What makes Masons unique is that membership within the Order has been driven by family relations. Visibility within the community is important for membership growth. But it cannot be a substitute for intergenerational family ties. Respondents to the General Membership Survey who indicated a family member was a Mason identified a grandfather more often than a parent or uncle combined. This skipped generation has critical implications for the family continuity that in the past was responsible for increases in membership. In the General Population Survey nearly 40 percent of respondents who had a positive impression of the organization indicated their perception was based on knowing a In the General Population Survey nearly 40 percent of respondents who had a positive impression of the organization indicated their perception was based on knowing a family member, friend, or neighbor who was a Mason. family member, friend, or neighbor who was a Mason. More than 75 percent of Masons indicated that they had a family member who was also a Mason. So perhaps interest in Masons is generated more by the character of Masonic friends rather than the mission or activities of the Order. Greater Visibility within the Community Both Masons and the general public indicated that greater visibility of the organization was needed. This probably doesn t require Kansas Masons to get involved in different services or modify rituals, just to get greater recognition from activities in which they are already engaged. More familiarity with Masonic activities, tradition, and beliefs should aid recruitment and diminish the misinformation about the Order. Stronger Member Development Focus within the Masons All Masons need to have more interaction with potential members. The average of 3.3 individuals contacted in the past two years by other members is too meager to support Lodge membership growth. Growth in membership largely falls on the shoulders of younger Masons. Decreasing membership and the aging of active members pose special challenges for attracting new members. Peer contacts tend to be made with friends the same age. Since many Kansas Masons are no longer in the workforce, the pool of contacts shrinks. 12 THE KANSAS MASON

13 GRAND LODGE By Robert F. Nelson, Treasurer, Emporia Lodge No.12, A.F. & A.M Keeping paper and electronic records organized is also a must - create a logical filing system and remember that you (and your successor) will need to locate reports and filings you ve created. Lodge Treasurers Let s Get Organized! So you ve been elected to the office of Treasurer of your lodge. Congratulations! If you re like me, you re not a financial professional, so your new duties may appear daunting. Don t worry though you have a lot of Brothers in Masonry willing to help you get proficient! In my experience, the secret to being a successful Treasurer is simple: work closely with your Secretary and get organized. You and the Secretary are a team financially, the Secretary is responsible for collecting all receipts and you are responsible for making deposits, writing checks and reporting the financial matters of the Lodge. If you work together and establish a good process, you should be able to perform your routine Treasurer s duties in less than an hour a week. The first step in organization is to use a planning calendar to create reminders for the financial events for which you re responsible, back timing these reminders so you don t miss a deadline. Allow yourself adequate time to prepare your reports and filings, and add some flex time for each event so you re not always hurrying to get to the post office before it closes! Keeping paper and electronic records organized is also a must - create a logical filing system and remember that you (and your successor) will need to locate reports and filings you ve created. Let s get started on that calendar. The following is a list of the reports and returns required for our lodge, which meets on the 1st and 3rd Mondays of each month adjust your calendar for your Lodge s meeting schedule accordingly. Note: This article does not cover those filings required for lodges with employees there are several annual and quarterly filings due to the Social Security Administration and Department of the Treasury (the IRS) if your lodge has paid staff. See for more information. continued on page 14 WINTER

14 GRAND LODGE Lodge Treasurers Let s Get Organized! continued from page 13 EVERY OTHER WEEK PRIOR TO OUR STATED COMMUNICATION: Meet with the Secretary a day or two before the Stated Communication. This will give him time to open the mail and collect receipts, and allow you to prepare the reading of the bills and create Treasurer s reports at our lodge, in written format for inclusion in the consent agenda. Our Secretary separates incoming communications, receipts and bills into labeled folders as they arrive. He tracks incoming cash and checks in a written ledger and categorizes them appropriately (dues, facilities rental, etc.). I can then do my job: 1. Receive all checks and cash from the Secretary and provide him a receipt. Sound familiar? This practice should not be bypassed! The Secretary and Treasurer work together creating a sound financial practice using checks and balances to help prevent mistakes, or worse! (While I trust my lodge Brothers unequivocally, I know of lodges and other nonprofit groups that have been impacted by embezzlement.) Having the Secretary keep a ledger of incoming moneys may seem redundant, but more than once his ledger has saved me from mistakes that might have created hard feelings with my Brothers in the lodge. When I hand him his receipt (a copy of the week s payee names and amounts I ve entered into our accounting software), he compares those amounts with those he has recorded, confirming our totals balance. 2. Write checks for financial obligations occurring since the last meeting and provide a list to the Secretary for reading during the business meeting (or, as noted earlier, include in the consent agenda). This is the second step of checks and balances that helps keep the Lodge s finances on track giving the Secretary a list of the bills is important, since he s opened the incoming invoices and has an idea of the payees and amounts involved. His reading of the bills (or consent agenda) also provides transparency to the Brethren. A couple other tips: When a Brother submits a store receipt for reimbursement, I ask him to sign it there s nothing more frustrating than not knowing to whom to write the check! Also, require two signatures on lodge checks a common accounting practice which helps ensure funds are properly distributed that is required by Grand Lodge by-law (see Duties of the Treasurer ; by-law 3-308). 3. Make note of your current checking account balance At each Stated Communication, we provide the current checking account balance, from your checkbook ledger or via online banking. This is yet another example of financial transparency. EVERY OTHER WEEK IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE STATED COMMUNICATION: 1. Receive any moneys collected that day from the Secretary, and again give him a receipt. Often Brothers will make payments the evening of the Communication. The Secretary receives these moneys, records and categorizes them, then gives them to the Treasurer, again obtaining a written receipt. 2. Account for these last minute receipts in an electronic (preferred) or paper ledger, appropriately categorizing each receipt. In the past, I used a spreadsheet or Quicken, but now use QuickBooks to allow me to quickly create a printed report of the days receipts. 3. Prepare the bank deposit. Organize cash and checks and double-check the deposit slip to ensure accuracy and to minimize your time at the bank (you ve got better things to do, don t you?). MONTHLY: 1. Prepare financial statements for lodge review. Since our first Stated Communication is on the first Monday, our monthly reports are presented at the second Stated Communication via our consent agenda. This practice allows time to receive the bank statement and balance the checkbook. I present two reports each month - a transactions report and a reconciliation report, both easily produced using QuickBooks accounting software. The transactions report is a listing of all cash transactions (cash and checks) for the previous month, while reconciliation report shows all checks and deposits that have cleared the bank during the same period. Using paper accounting, these reports are somewhat time consuming, but both are important to the Brethren (and your accountant!) The transactions report will identify lost checks and provide transparency for your actions, while you (or your accountant) will need the reconciliation report to determine the lodge s exact assets for your IRS returns (more on these later). Electronic accounting makes these reports very easy to produce and helps prevent math errors. 14 THE KANSAS MASON

15 Software? There, I ve said it again QuickBooks. I mention QuickBooks, not as an endorsement, but because we are in the process of switching from Quicken to QuickBooks, specifically to enable our accounting firm to directly import our financial data when preparing our annual non-profit return, the long-form 990 described following. When considering accounting software for your use, check with your accountant (if applicable) to find out what software plays best with theirs, and weigh your options. The EIN One other thing you ll need, even if you don t have employees, is an Employer Identification Number (or EIN, a.k.a. Taxpayer ID number, or TIN). Each lodge should have an EIN. Find this number on a previous filing and keep it handy. For a brand new lodge, getting an EIN is a simple online process. Visit irs.gov and search for EIN to apply. Kansas Employer Serial Number (a.k.a. Employer s state ID No )? Since our lodge pays unemployment taxes to the State of Kansas, we have an Employer Serial Number used on state forms and W-2 s provided employees. Again, if your lodge has been in existence for more than a year, and you have employees, you should have a Kansas Employer Serial Number. If you re a new lodge, contact the Kansas Department of Labor or visit to obtain a Kansas Employer Serial Number. Even if you don t currently have employees, you may in the future, so keep a record of this number. Lodges chartered in Kansas by the Grand Lodge of Kansas are considered 501(c)(10) fraternal organizations and are typically exempt from federal and state income tax. To maintain this status, all lodges are required to submit an annual non-profit return (IRS From 990 in one of three flavors ) annually. For the vast majority of lodges in Kansas, the electronically filed 990-N e-postcard is all that s needed. Maintaining tax-exempt status is critical to your Lodge! If your tax exemption is revoked, you will be subject to state and federal income taxes on all dues, rental income and donations made to the lodge. Please consult with an accounting professional if you have any questions regarding creation or submission of the 990-N, 990-EZ, or 990 returns! Also note that the principal officers of the lodge must review your 990 or 990-EZ returns prior to filing as this is a requirement listed on the return itself, and it s always a good practice to have more than one set of eyes checking for errors before filing. If you cannot submit your 990 or 990-EZ return by the due date, submit a Form 8868, Application for Extension of Time to File an Exempt Organization Return, to request an automatic 3-month extension of time to file. NOTE: All Form 990 filings are subject to public inspection, and failure to file your return on time may result in a penalty of $20/day late for those using a 990-EZ or 990. See Which-Forms-Do-Exempt-Organizations-File%3F-(Filing-Phase-In) for additional information. ANNUALLY: NOTE: The Grand Lodge of Kansas is not an umbrella organization for Kansas lodges each Kansas lodge is required to submit their own return (as applicable) described below. Internal Revenue Service Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990, Form 990-EZ, or Form 990-N) Due: The 15th day of the 5th month after the organizations accounting period ends (i.e. May 15th for a calendar year filer). You cannot file this return until after your tax year-ends. Form 990-N Annual Electronic Notice for Small Organizations Most Kansas lodges have total gross receipts (income) of less than $50,000 from dues, rentals, donations and fundraising and have total assets of less than $500,000. For these lodges, the Form 990-N e-postcard should be used (although you may submit the 990-EZ or 990 form instead). Properly completed and filed annually, by the deadline, will maintain your tax-exempt status for another year. While there is no financial penalty for late submission, failure to file may result in the loss of your lodge s tax-exempt status. If you continued on page 16 WINTER

16 GRAND LODGE Lodge Treasurers Let s Get Organized! continued from page 15 miss the deadline, file as soon as possible anyway. Form 990-EZ Short Form Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax Kansas lodges with total gross receipts of less than $200,000 and total assets less than $500,000 at the end of their tax year may file a 990-EZ return. I recommend Treasurers consult an accounting professional to ensure they properly complete the 990-EZ forms and schedules prior to filing. Make sure you file this return on time or obtain an extension if you can t make the deadline. See for additional information. Form 990 Kansas lodges with total gross receipts of at least $200,000 or total assets equal to or greater than $500,000 at the end of their tax year must file a 990 return. Again, Treasurers should consult an accounting professional to ensure they properly complete the 990 forms and schedules prior to filing and make sure you file on time or receive an extension. See for additional information. Now that we ve kept the government happy, let s move on to those items required to properly support our Lodge Budget Due: By tradition, at beginning of lodge year; no by-law reference Now that you have your calendar nearly complete, don t forget to include a reminder several months in advance your Annual Communication to help prepare the Master of the Lodge in preparing a budget, the earlier, the better. In our lodge, we typically present the budget at the first Stated Communication under the new Master, and move for acceptance at his next Stated, although we ve seen some budgets accepted immediately. Start the budget process early begin working on the budget early during the future Master s year as Senior Warden (or, better yet, when he is Junior Warden.) Annual Financial Review Due: as soon as practical after the Annual Communication, and a report shall be submitted to the Lodge at a Stated Communication not later than forty-five days after said Stated Communication by-law Required by Grand Lodge by-law, a financial audit is an annual requirement, and should be conducted as soon as possible after the new line of officers is installed. Performed by the lodge s Finance Committee (by-law 3-317), the Lodge Secretary and Treasurer should be on hand to answer any questions and locate the following records for review: Monthly financial reports including transactions and reconciliation reports. Our lodge reviews and approves these reports as part of our consent agenda so they are included with the minutes of the lodge throughout the year. Bank statements (checking and savings) and copies of cancelled checks. Note that most banks no longer provide cancelled checks with their statements most will provide small photocopies with the statements if you select a checking account (usually for a small monthly fee) that provides this service. Believe me this expense is definitely worth the cost during the financial review process. Investment reports (trust funds, property, etc.) Membership records (provided by the Secretary) Copies of all Kansas and Federal returns, including your 990 annual return from the previous tax year. While somewhat daunting, note this by-law does not require a CPA firm be involved. That said, asking a Brother with an accounting or financial background to assist will help ensure the process is thorough without requiring a large amount of time. Proper record keeping and organization are critical! At our lodge, this audit requires less than two hours of committee time in one evening, although preparing the audit and the final written report usually takes a few more hours of the chair of the Finance Committee s time. That s it we ve built a calendar of Treasurer s events to keep your lodge in the good graces of the civil authorities, Grand Lodge, and your membership. You are now ready to face your year as Treasurer, confident that you ll beat your deadlines, provide transparency to the Craft, and create a new best friend in your Secretary! 16 THE KANSAS MASON

17 GRAND LODGE Grand Master s C2A Class Sets a High Standard By Kansas Masonic Foundation Staff The Grand Master-sanctioned Chance to Advance (C2A), held at the Wichita Scottish Rite Center on August 9, 2014, was an impressive success. This singular forum advanced 34 Entered Apprentices to Fellow Crafts, and then on the status of Master Masons. This is the only class this year, M.W. Grand Master Michael Halleran said, as he opened Grand Lodge to launch this rare event. All aspects of it came together to make it every bit as special as it was singular, and more than 110 attendees were on hand to profit from it. As Halleran observed, I was surprised and pleased at the number of attendees, mentors and candidates at the class the level of enthusiasm was really something to see, and the Work - as expected was first rate. Your Grand Senior Deacon, Bob Talbott, and all the Grand Lecturers really went all out in putting on this event, and I am very grateful for their hard work. The all-day event was attended by a full contingent of Grand Lodge Officers, and the Degree Work was exemplified by the corp of Grand Lecturers, who all put on their very best work. Six Past Grand Masters were also in attendance, as were Area and District Grand Masters from across the state. M.W. Jeff Sowder, Past Grand Master in 1997, highlighted the great work done by the Grand Lecturers at the event, since the elevated Work on display will lead directly to the many Lodges who, in turn, will themselves go on to exemplify the same high quality Degree Work they witnessed that day. One of the new Master Masons, Joseph Johns of Great Bend Lodge No. 15, declared the day to be very enjoyable and enlightening, singling out the Work of the Grand Lecturers for special commendation, while another of our newest Master Masons remarked that it was an awesome experience that inspired him to seek even more light. The Chance To Advance class was one of the most significant Grand Lodge events this year, and it represented something of a compromise. The Grand Master is charged with representing his constituents all of them and many Brothers have been asking for the Grand Lodge to permit full-on One Day Classes, where a candidate could take all three degrees in one day. Many other continued on page 18 FALL

18 GRAND LODGE Grand Master s C2A Class Sets a High Standard continued from page 17 brothers were very opposed to that idea, as I confess I was myself. The Chance to Advance class was a middle ground, where I hoped to provide the best possible Work under Grand Lodge standards of quality, while still providing the convenience that a true one-day conferral offers. The Council of Administration will be evaluating feedback, as well as the participation of all the appendant bodies, and I am sure next year s administration will use that feedback in determining whether or not the event will continue. Grand Lecturer, Bob Talbott, provided an elegant summary of the day s events, and where he hopes Kansas Masonry will go from here: This year s C2A was a tremendous effort, brought together by some of the most extremely talented Masonic ritualists and leadership in Kansas. Congratulations are certainly due to all the newly raised Master Masons from the C2A class, as well as to their local Lodges. There is much work for all of us to do, so now is the time to go forth, find your place in Freemasonry, and make the kind of difference of which we can all be proud. The Masonic life is a journey, and no matter when each of us started, we have all only just begun. Robert L. Tomlinson, Jr., PGM Resigns New Interim Grand Treasurer Appointed Robert L. Tomlinson, Jr. L. Kent Needham Grand Master Michael Halleran accepted M.W. Bob s resignation with regret, knowing that with his recent move out-ofstate would make the job requirements very hard to fulfill outside of Kansas. M.W. Bob has been a great guiding force for the Grand Lodge and the Council of Administration, Halleran noted. Whenever we faced difficult decisions, or when we looked for guidance and wisdom to determine a course of action, Bob was always there for us, whispering good counsel in our ears. His contribution as a Grand Lodge Officer and as a member of the Council will be sorely missed. Deputy Grand Master Daren Kellerman said M.W. Bob s retirement leaves us with some very big shoes to fill. Whenever the Craft has needed him, in whatever capacity, M.W. Bob has always stepped up and been there for all Kansas Masons. I know I can speak for the Craft and the Council of Administration in wishing him the very best in his retirement. Acting under the authority of the Laws of Kansas Masonry, the Grand Master has appointed L. Kent Needham, PGM, as the interim Grand Treasurer. Reached by telephone, M.W. Kent said that he was honored to be considered for the position, and that he accepts the interim appointment. He stated further he will humbly serve the Craft as Grand Treasurer for the remainder of Bob s term. Any future service as Grant Treasurer will be subject to the will of the Craft in March. A banker by profession, M.W. Bro. Needham will stand for election at the 2015 Annual Communication in March. If elected, he will serve as Grand Treasurer for the ensuing Masonic year. 18 THE KANSAS MASON

19 GRAND LODGE By Kansas Masonic Foundation Staff New District School Format Crosses Kansas Have you heard about or attended one of the newly structured District Schools that launched this fall? You've asked for change in the District School format and your Grand Lodge leadership has listened. While the ritual and floor movement of our degrees and ceremonies are rooted in antiquity it is our obligation to listen to the Craft and change the way some of the ritual is instructed. Attend a District School and let your District Deputy or Grand Lecturer know what works and what you need to learn the ritual of our great craft DISTRICT MEETING SCHEDULE (Combined districts are grouped and color coded) District Lodge City DDGM Grand Lecturer Assigned Start Time Date Assigned 1 Hiawatha No. 35 Hiawatha, KS Wayne Rector 9:00 AM 1/31/ Hancock No. 311 Leavenworkth, KS Victor Henke Vernon Clark 9:00 AM 1/17/ Henri No. 190 Tonganoxi, KS Andrew Cassity David Neal 9:00 AM 10/18/ Lawrence No. 6 Lawrence, KS Michael Stoops David Neal 9:00 AM 1/24/ Rosedale No. 333 Merriam, KS Kevin Hughes C. David Williams 9:00 AM 1/17/ Peace No. 243 Louisburg, KS Mike Johnson Bob Talbott 9:00 AM 1/24/ Parker No. 341 Parker, KS Daren Kellerman Vernon Clark 9:00 AM 1/10/ Parker No. 341 Parker, KS Gene Becker Vernon Clark 9:00 AM 1/10/ Xenia No. 47 Xenia, KS Wayne Rector Vernon Clark 9:00 AM 11/8/ Vulcan No. 229 Walnut, KS Don Wheeler Don Newman 9:00 AM 1/17/ Erie Erie, KS Dale Fritz C. David Williams 9:00 AM 1/10/ Erie Erie, KS C. David Williams 9:00 AM 1/10/ Iola No. 38 Iola, KS Kim Colgin David Snyder 9:00 AM 1/31/ Hebron No. 314 Gridly, KS Chris Birk Earl Bryant / Don Newman 9:00 AM 1/3/ Golden Rule No. 90 Topeka, KS Bob Amyx David Neal 9:00 AM 11/22/ Golden Rule No. 90 Topeka, KS Bob Amyx David Neal 9:00 AM 11/22/ York Rite Bldg (Topeka) Topeka, KS Mike Bell C. David Williams 9:00 AM 1/31/ York Rite Bldg (Topeka) Topeka, KS Don Davidson C. David Williams 9:00 AM 1/31/ Lafayette No. 16 Manhattan, KS Daniel Bostrom Ron Main 9:00 AM 1/24/ Lafayette No. 16 Manhattan, KS Daniel Bostrom Ron Main 9:00 AM 1/24/ Lafayette No. 16 Manhattan, KS Daniel Bostrom Ron Main 9:00 AM 1/24/ Salina No. 160 Salina, KS Timothy Fowler Don Newman/Earl Bryan 9:00 AM 1/31/ Salina No. 160 Salina, KS Timothy Fowler Don Newman/Earl Bryan 9:00 AM 1/31/ Emporia No. 12 Emporia, KS Mark Snider Wayne Rector 9:00 AM 1/24/ Hope No. 155 Howard, KS Same Oakleaf Bob Talbott 9:00 AM 1/10/ Oxford No. 165 Oxford, KS Aaron Rush Don Newman/Ron Detwiler 9:00 AM 1/10/ Haysville No. 112 Haysville, KS Lowell Brown Ron Main 9:00 AM 2/21/ Joppa No. 222 Leon, KS Alan Kelley Don Newman/Ron Detwiler 9:00 AM 1/24/ Newton No. 142 Newton, KS Dahl Carmichael David Snyder 9:00 AM 1/10/ Northstar No. 168 Wichita, KS Bryant Devine David Snyder 9:00 AM 1/17/ Delta No. 77 Medicine Lodge, KS Jason Gibson Vernon Butt 9:00 AM 10/25/ Sterling No. 131 Sterling, KS Kelly Long Vernon Butt 9:00 AM 1/10/ Bellevile No. 129 Belleville, KS Lonnie Craig Wayne Rector 9:00 AM 2/28/ Millbrook No. 281 Hill City, KS Alex Leslie David Snyder 9:00 AM 10/25/ Russell No. 177 Russell, KS George Read Vernon Butt 9:00 AM 1/24/ St. Benard No. 222 Dodge City, KS Ben Parker Ron Main 9:00 AM 1/31/ Fargo No. 300 Liberal, KS Mark Brack C. David Williams 9:00 AM 1/24/ Anthem No. 284 Scott City, KS Larry Ochs Vernon Butt 9:00 AM 11/15/ Sharon Springs No. 417 Sharon Springs, KS Mark Smith Vernon Butt 9:00 AM 11/22/2014 WINTER

20 GRAND LODGE By John G. Crary, PM, Hancock Lodge No. 311 I recently had the opportunity to study a truly amazing document: The Edinburgh Register House Manuscript 1696, which is believed to be the oldest written example of Masonic Ritual. Please ponder that date for a moment What the world was like 318 years ago? Let s take a quick look. In London, England, Parliament enacts legislation that creates the Bank of England. In the Anglo-Scottish border region of Scotland, a devastating famine leads to a significant migration of Scots into England. In Russia, during the Russo-Turkish War, Peter the Great begins his second campaign against the Turkish fortress of Azov. The Treaty of Turin is reached by King Louis XIV of France and Victor Amadeus II, the Duke of Savoy. In Colonial America, The English Parliament passes legislation dictating that all colonial trade had to be done using only British-built ships. The Navigation Act of 1696 also expands the powers of customs commissioners, giving them the authority to commit forcible entry and requiring that bonds be posted on certain goods. In the great state of Connecticut, Highway 108 is built, connecting Stratford and Trumbull, a distance of about 3.2 miles. It is the third oldest highway in Connecticut. In 1696, the birth of Our Nation s Founding Fathers, including John Adams, Patrick Henry, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Washington, just to name a few, is still 30 to 50 years in the future. Shakespeare had been gone for eighty years, and the year that marks the symbolic birth of our country was still eighty years away. Suffice it to say that the world of 1696 was beset with many nowunknown dangers, and the times were very different in innumerable ways. So I was quite pleasantly surprised and totally intrigued by the extremely clear connections between modern Masonic Ritual and the Ritual described in The Edinburgh Register House Manuscript Many of the test questions and answers presented in 1696 were surprisingly familiar to this Mason over three hundred years later, as I sat reading them here in Many words and phrases used in that manuscript are hauntingly familiar, and I have no doubt that with very little preparation time, an active modern Mason could prove himself with little trouble, only to find himself sitting in Lodge with brothers of 318 years ago. What a treat that would be. Even the orders of appearance in which the questions and answers appear are familiar to modern Masons. From the first question, Are you a Mason? all the way through to Are you a fellow craft? clearly embodies information still requested and given. And almost without exception, the self-same questions are found in today s Entered Apprentice Degree, including the second and third section lectures. Some information is blurred, or at least from our point of view, possibly borrowed from other Degrees, but the underlying theme is still very clear, some fifteen score and eight years later. Of particular interest is the comparison of where ancient Masons met, versus those of We learn that our ancient Brethren usually met on a high hill or a low dale.to keep off all cowans and eavesdroppers. It is clear that the need for secrecy and security was as fundamental to ancient Masonry as it still remains many centuries later. Compare that with the description of where our Brethren of the 17th Century met: a day s Journey from a burroughs town, without bark of a dog or crow of a cock. Without doubt, these early Brothers also shared the same fundamental need for security and secrecy a need that, at least where Masonry is concerned, seems timeless. After studying this manuscript, it is easy to see where the roots of our modern Masonic ritual come from. If a man was asked if he was a Mason and answered affirmatively, the next challenge was, How shall I know it? Our 17th Century Brethren were instructed to answer By signs tokens and other points of entry. I believe this reference in the manuscript is a direct ancestor, so to speak, of our modern Ritual, wherein we speak of the four cardinal virtues. Now let us look at how our 17th Century Brothers talked about their Lodge. The examiner would ask, Where shall I find the key of your Lodge? Please note that this question is very 20 THE KANSAS MASON

21 TRUMBULL specific and carefully worded. He does not ask where the key to the lodge is, or where shall he might find the key for the lodge, but rather asks about the key of your lodge. The correct answer is Three foot and an half from the lodge door, under a perpend esler, and a green divot. But under the lap of my liver, where all my secrets of my heart lie. What does this answer mean? Taken literally, it means three feet six inches outside the Lodge door. It is under a perpend esler, which is a prepared perpendicular stone. And a last hint is added and a green divot, which denotes green grass. From this description, we can deduce that our 17th Century Brothers believed the key to their lodge was located on the outside of the Lodge door, STRATFORD under a prepared upright stone, which was sitting on green grass. This sounds exactly like the description of a grave. Our early brothers must have believed they took the key to their Lodge with them upon their death. The second part of the question, But under the lap [lobe] of my liver, where all my secrets of my heart lie, represents to me that all secrets, especially Masonic ones, are to be closely guarded. I also believe that this passage contains the very early inklings of what our modern Ritual refers to as jewels of the Second Degree. We have earlier examined where this early Masonic writer says the key to his lodge is generally located, but what exactly was this key, and where was it kept? The next question helps tell us that: Which is the key of your lodge? Here the choice of words is curious yet again. What is not used. Rather our Brethren chose which. This convinces me further that they were indicating that their key was with them in the grave. If this was not the case, the proper word to use would have been what. But the examiner, knowing that the grave was the real location in question, would naturally want to know, of all the remains in a grave, Which is the key of your lodge? The answer given is this: A weel hung tongue. This phrase translates today to a well-held tongue, which is characteristic of someone who can keep secrets and does not participate in frivolous gossip. The follow-on question asks, Where lies the key? Here we have a very direct and pointed question. It is answered this way: In the bone box. Staying with the grave analogy, the bone box must be referring to the skull, where the tongue is housed. Our 17th Century Brothers obviously placed significant importance on secrecy and created an elaborate and clever way of teaching themselves that cornerstone lesson of our fraternity. I am firmly convinced that the miracle of our Ritual is derived from the purest of hearts. For centuries, many of the brightest and best educated men the world has ever known have studied, pondered, prayed over, and risked their lives and fortunes, all based on the words of our Ritual. These words have been chosen very carefully and undoubtedly stem from Special Providence. So from whence have we came? From a very long and distinguished line of Brothers and Fellows, who have created the treasured basis upon which we may all, one golden day, enjoy endless refreshment in the Grand Lodge above. WINTER

22 FROM THE ARCHIVES By Kansas Masonic Foundation Staff Kansas Masonic Foundation Takes First Step In Preserving Kansas Masonic History Good news! A new and important Masonic journey has just begun. The Kansas Masonic Foundation has taken the first step in preserving the rich history of Kansas Freemasonry by funding the digitization of the Grand Lodge Annual Proceedings, starting with the very first entry in 1856 and continuing straight through to today. The Annual Meeting Minutes/ Proceedings which include almost 50,000 pages are being scanned and digitized to ensure that this collection will be preserved for the future in a form that s both readily available and user-friendly. As a result, researchers and Brothers across the World will have easy access to these records whenever and wherever they might be needed. To make this necessity a reality, The Grand Lodge of Kansas will be working with The George Washington National Memorial Association to host the digital files and make them easily accessible. Further, as more and more Masonic jurisdictions also choose to partner with The George Washington National Memorial Association, it will be increasingly possible for Masons in their many jurisdictions across the length and breadth of the country to access the exact information they need at the very time they may need it. Not only will all of the Annual Proceedings be available, they will also be indexed so that researchers and Masons alike can search them using any search criteria they might like to locate whatever information they want or need, even across many years and many miles, as well as in a growing number of locations, further expediting the efficiency and value of the new system. This is only the FIRST of many critical steps in preserving the past of Kansas Freemasonry, but it s definitely a significant step in its own right. The process of preserving the priceless collection that resides within the walls of Grand Lodge Building will take several years and a substantial investment of time and treasure, and the commitment of the Kansas Masonic Foundation to get started with this first endeavor is only a small part of our overall plan for the future. But as Kansas Masons with a proud past, preserving a big part of the historical basis of that pride will play a key role in getting Kansas Masonry headed in the direction where we all want it to go. Every journey begins with a single step, as the apt old saying goes, and this well-chosen start not only moves to preserve our cherished history, but also makes it accessible to the public at large in a form they can understand and appreciate. But as always when we embark on a new Masonic adventure together, it will take all of us working together to give it the kind of ending we all want it to have. 22 THE KANSAS MASON

23 MEMBER INTERVIEW By Kansas Masonic Foundation Staff Rob McClarty Rob McClarty is happily married to his wife Jana for 28 years. Together they have two adult children Justin and Alycia, and both are engaged to be married later this fall. This will give him another daughter, Melissa, and son, Nate Spriggs. With nearly 28 years in law enforcement, he began his career as a Reserve Deputy Sheriff in Kalispell, Montana. In 1991, he relocated to Hutchinson, Kansas, where he accepted a position as a full-time police officer. In the fall of 2011, after a 21-year career in Hutchinson, he was selected as the Chief of Police in McPherson, Kansas. Though he is not as active as he once was, he is still an avid SCUBA diver and instructor. For the past two years, he has also served as the Chairman of the Kansas State Fair Foundation Board and as a board member there since He is an active member of both the Kansas Association of Chiefs of Police and the International Association of Chiefs of Police. He currently enjoys life as an empty nester with Jana, thriving on community activities, travel, fun, and challenging life experiences, shared with his friends and his Brother Masons. Rob is an active member of Lindsborg Lodge No. 397, where he serves as the Junior Deacon, along with being active in the Scottish Rite and York Rite (Salina, KS), with aspirations to continue his quest for Masonic Light and involvement in all levels of Masonry. How did you find out about Freemasonry? I first heard about Freemasonry when I was very young, and its mystique has always intrigued me. I never knew whom to ask about it, or about the ask one to be one principle. But soon after I moved to McPherson, I found that several of my officers were Masons. As I began to watch and observe these men, their character and not only how they presented themselves, but also how they truly served our community as leaders I knew that I had to know more, and I began asking them questions. I was soon invited to a Lodge installation dinner and the installation ceremony that followed it, where I was afforded the opportunity to meet and fellowship with a number of other Masons. A member of my Command Staff was just then becoming the Worshipful Master at Lindsborg Lodge. He began answering my questions, and I knew I wanted to be part of this group. Soon thereafter, I was Entered, Passed, and Raised. What do your friends think about your involvement? My friends include Masons and non-masons, who hold varying opinions about the Brotherhood, ranging from being supportive, to expressing little or no interest in even knowing anything more about Freemasonry. I have a couple friends who are currently non-masons, who support what we do and have recently even begun to ask questions about it; maybe someday they, too, will want to become Masons. Why is Freemasonry important to you? Freemasonry is important to me for so many reasons. I believe each of us has a duty to God, to our families, and to ourselves, in that we should continually strive to be the very best that we can be. It may be a cliché, but through Freemasonry, we have the unity of our fraternity, which affords us the opportunity to have men of the highest caliber as our mentors, mentees, friends and allies. Also through Freemasonry, we have access to an array of tools and educational opportunities that allow us to develop the traits, techniques, and practical skills of leadership. These are abilities that we are able to rely upon, not only in the Lodge, but also in our daily lives church, family, work, and community. Why is Freemasonry important to your community? Many upright Masons are actively involved in giving back to our community, through child safety events, scholarships, highway cleanups, charitable giving, and community leadership. We have Masons spread throughout our community, as key governmental leaders, educators, businessmen, laborers, and church members. Freemasonry is important to every community in which it exists because of the upright, ethical, charitable, honorable men who are part of the Brotherhood. How has Freemasonry inspired you, or made you a better person? Masonic values and education have inspired and helped me to be a better man, husband, father, friend and Christian on the level. continued on page 34 WINTER

24 AROUND THE WORLD By Perry Cross Jr., Assistant Grand Tyler Midwest Conference of Grand Lodges Far Exceeds Expectations The trip to Madison, Wisconsin for the Midwestern Conference of Grand Lodges was an awesome experience for me. I had gotten a call from the Deputy Grand Master, asking if I could attend. My answer was, Of course. Being low man on the totem pole, I assumed I would be carrying bags, or expected to take meticulous notes during the breakout sessions, while the Big Wigs mingled and enjoyed fellowship. And in all honesty, both of those tasks would have been all right with me, since just the fact that I was invited to attend really was an honor, all by itself. Before starting the drive from Fort Riley to Topeka that Friday morning, I had visualized how the drive up would be. I was going to be riding with the Deputy Grand Master; the Grand Secretary, who is a Past Grand Master; the Grand Sword Bearer, who has been awarded an Unlimited Card; and an Area Deputy Grand Master, who was a recent recipient of the Grand Master s Order of Merit, so Kansas Masons are out front leading the way in the region. I was expecting a pretty stuffy and rigid four-hour drive. But I was in for a pleasant surprise. Conversations and ideas immediately started flying back and forth in the van. Differences, agreements, points and counter points, all rapidly started being fired back and forth. I was making mental notes on everything that was being said and soon fully understood that we have Brothers in our Craft who are so passionate about our institution and have such a wealth of knowledge and vision that they could keep us moving forward for another 300 years all by themselves. On the level is more than just a slogan or a way to pay lip service to a principle these Brothers instantly made me feel included and sought my opinion on matters pertaining to improving the larger Masonic experience, not to mention on what should be done to improve things at the local Lodge level. It was truly an experience that I will never forget and that was just the drive up. Once we arrived and got settled, I again had visions of what it would be like meeting Brothers from the other jurisdictions. I was sure that I would feel uncomfortable and out of place. But once again, I was happy to be wrong. As soon as we got there and were greeted by the Host Grand Lodge Officers, there was instant comfort and fellowship. 24 THE KANSAS MASON

25 Handshakes and introductions were made, and I was immediately put at ease because I was amongst Brothers. The entire environment was great and comforting. And the blocks of instruction quickly showed me two things: first, that Masonry is alive and well in the Midwest and Canada and will continue, not only to survive, but to flourish, as long as Brothers like these are at the Helm of their respective jurisdictions; and second, that Kansas Masonry is at the very tip of the spear, at least when it comes to charting a progressive Masonic direction. While we learned a great deal from the other Jurisdictions that were there, it became clear that Kansas Masonry, through our Lodges, is truly making great strides, and others at the conference were eager to learn more about the things we are doing. We were asked what kind of impact our programs and projects have made and what obstacles we had met along the way. In the past, I had sometimes suspected that it was just the Grand Lodge Officers duty to make a visit and then always say things like, Kansas Masons are out front leading the way in the region. I thought such cheerful claims were just encouraging Grand Lodge talking points, designed to help keep us motivated, but this trip affirmed for me both that we really are aggressive and relentless in our approach to improving our fraternity and that the things we do really are working. At the dinner table, other Brothers wanted to know about our Affinity lodges, how we make and keep The Kansas Mason such an excellent publication, and how our Leadership Academy works even our Degree Petition forms were singled out as exceptional. Brand recognition and quality are imperative to making our future successful, and we definitely seem continued on page 29 Fraternal Secrets By James K. Remick. M.P.S. Newly enrolled members within the Masonic brotherhood who have had little or no information on the subject, are momentarily disturbed when they discover that there is offered to unwary buyers publications purporting to set forth the secrets of Masonry. It is not a new thing and each generation seems to supply certain queer mentalities, who either from the incentive to, be vicious or having a monetary motive have offered the public such a poor exhibition of literature that it would seem incredible a reputable publisher or dealer would find the time or space for it. The naturally resentful brother need have little concern. These purveyors of so-called secrets are as far from having entered the inner sanctum as they are from being commercially dignified. It is reasonable to understand that should all of Masonry be concealed under secret ritual no light could ever shine to beckon into the fold those who may have attained to the honor. Masonry has nothing to hide or to secrete. To the contrary it expounds the doctrine that has led mankind from the unthinking clod to his present attainments, and it is that journey wherein lies the secrets that sordid gold-gathering would befoul. Enlightenment within Masonry is an individual attainment and the door is closed upon the real secrets until opened from within. The ritual of the Craft is but symbolism and the real secrets are only heard by a beholding brother and never peddled by profanes. It is perhaps appropriate to term the inner mysteries recondite rather than secret; so what could a purveyor of clandestine compilations know of the silver cord or of the golden bowl. The ladder of Jacob and its place in human history and effort is beyond the ken of a literary bootlegger. It requires the talents of an honest man to uncover and practically apply the real secrets of Masonry, and such a man has neither idle time nor incentive to besmirch his honor with a tawdry offering that could only interest the morbid. The secret of the Inner Chamber is for those only who are worthy and have attained to the high honor and the right to abide therein. The "open sesame" is the recondite property of the individual and is never purchased in the market, nor is there a short path to the door thereof. To discover the secret of the All-Seeing Eye entails the labor of ages. To fathom the reason for the Masonic apron is to acquire knowledge known only in full measure by the Priest Kings of millennia past. To understand and appreciate the significance of the sweet incense from the Masonic censor is to be in Fraternal communion with the Musters who long since have graduated their earthly tenure. And yet the soul in darkness labors in the delusion that the secrets of Freemasonry can be had for money. They have never been sold; they cannot he bought in the market; they are acquired through sacrifice and unfoldment. Ten Commandments have been vouchsafed for our guidance, to which we may add the eleventh that traffickers in worthless printing may well observe. Most applicable is this latter day admonition - "Mind your own business." Be not disturbed, Masonry nor its Principles have ever been bought or sold. WINTER

26 MAKING A DIFFERENCE By Kansas Masonic Foundation Staff KMF Band Camp Roars On Towards 40 On July 22nd of this year, the 31st Annual Kansas Masonic All-State Band Camp began its fourth decade of bringing together top band students from all over the state for a challenging and enjoyable week of musical achievement, unlike anything that most attendees have ever experienced before or in most cases, ever will again, unless, of course, they get to return to band camp. This year s camp followed the time-honored pattern of this event, in that it includes days that revolve around the daily practices that make the remarkable public performances the camp is known for possible. From the start of registration at 8 a.m. on Tuesday morning, when old friendships began to be renewed and new ones began to be made, to the last minute of camp after the halftime performance on the evening of Saturday the 26th, life for the 2014 campers was guided by the rhythms of hard work, fun, and often both at the same time. By this stage of the game, no band director alive is any more experienced and skilled at inspiring band camp students to play at the very highest level they possibly can than Douglas Whitten, Director of Athletic Bands at Pittsburg State University, and this year s group gave him plenty of talent to work with. Besides the very productive daily practice time, which totaled over 35 hours of in the hot sun, four of the week s major events deserve special mention. The first is the hamburger feed that took place on Tuesday evening, as a kind of welcome to camp. Pittsburg Lodge No. 187 was joined by members of Galena Lodge No. 194 in making that event possible, with Brothers from Galena setting up the large grill to cook the hamburgers and DURING A SPECIAL AWARD CEREMONY, THREE AWARDS WERE GIVEN OUT BY THE KANSAS MASONIC FOUNDATION. providing the manpower to cut and cook all of the homemade Suzy-Qs, which Prudence Lodge No. 100 provided the equipment to cook. All the rest of the hard work that made that very pleasant event the big success that it was came from Pittsburg Lodge No. 187, including the distribution of bottled water to the campers. Second, the evenings of bowling at Holiday Lanes on Wednesday and Friday during the week were stand-out events for all who were there. The staff of the bowling alley did a friendly and professional job, and the facility itself was cleverly designed and decorated with the idea of pleasing young people, so all who attended had little choice but to have a lot of fun. Thirdly, during a special award ceremony on Friday that included an excellent speech by Deputy Grand Master Daren L. Kellerman, three special awards were given out by the Kansas Masonic Foundation, with valuable input provided by Doug Whitten and his staff. Though the choice of winners for all of the awards given out was, as always, difficult, with such an accomplished array of musicians present, the $500 Masonic Pride Award, conceived to honor a student distinguished by random acts of kindness and service to all bandkind, went to Erick Sherman, from De Soto High School. Awarded this year for only the second 26 THE KANSAS MASON

27 Dear Kansas Masons, time, the $1000 Jeff Atherly Inspirational Award, given to a multi-year camp attendee, seen as instilling spirit and camaraderie throughout the band, went to Takoda Eckert, from Hugoton High School(who also gave a well-received presentation as the band representative at the East-West Shrine Bowl Banquet the same evening and is interviewed elsewhere in this issue). And finally, the $1500 Outstanding Musician Award, which has so far always gone out to a person who either went on to major or otherwise participate in band in college, went this year to Zerul Kutina, from Royal Valley High School. And fourth but as all involved would agree most importantly of all Thursday morning featured the opportunity for band camp attendees to meet representatives of the Shriner Hospitals for Children staff, patients, and parents of patients alike who together provided numerous striking insights into just how fortunate most of us are, simply to face the kinds challenges that life throws at everyone, without facing the additional obstacles provided by the kinds of physical disabilities that have shaped the lives of the patients whom this year s band camp students met. During a special meeting with four and five-year band camp attendees that KMF Director Robert Shively held, all the students in attendance agreed that it was always in those personal meetings with the young patients Thank you for giving me the chance to be in the Kansas Masonic All-State Marching Band because without you, I would have never had the opportunity to be a part of such a great event. I had an amazing time and it was definitely the biggest highlight of my summer. The Shrine Bowl is a great way to raise money for the Shriner kids and for all of the Shriner Hospitals and I was glad that I could be a part of it. This marching band gave me the opportunity to meet new people, improve my marching techniques and most importantly help out the Shriner society. It was such an inspirational trip and I loved every second of it. On the way to band camp I was a little scared because I was going to be one of the youngest kids there and I wasn t going to know anyone, but once I arrived I found out that I was going to be perfectly fine. The people I met at band camp were all amazing musicians and they were all great people. The staff and the marchers all made me feel very welcomed into the program and everyone was always very nice and respectful. I thought it was awesome meeting new people and being able to talk about things you had in common. It was also interesting hearing about the different parts of Kansas that people were from. I think that I laughed more during those five days than I have in my entire life. All of my friends had a great sense of humor and I will definitely remember them and keep in touch for a very long time. Another great part of the band camp also helped me as a musician too. I learned so many new things musically that I feel like I am senior in my high school marching band. Everything that I learned has helped me in one way or another with my music here and the band staff at Pitt State were such great directors and they were all very friendly and willing to help me with anything. I thought that the band camp was a very educational and beneficial week for me. My favorite part of the entire trip was meeting the Shriner kids and knowing that I was helping them by being a part of the band. Hearing their stories was inspirational and very heart warming. It made me really grateful of the things I have and the life I am living. It really moved me learning how the kids lived their lives and the challenges that they face. I was truly touched of how positive the kids were and how well they handled their life challenges. After seeing the kids I didn t look down on them because they were different than I was; I looked up to them as leaders. It is one thing to live a normal life and be happy but to live a life with so many challenges and still be such an amazing person. It s amazing. Those kids taught me that the best way to live life is to take what you have and turn it into something wonderful. I m glad that the money we raised went to the hospitals and to the Shriner kids because I wouldn t have wanted it to go anywhere else. I had an amazing time and I really hope I get the chance to return to the Shrine Bowl for the next four years. Thank you for such a breathtaking experience and I really think that the Shrine Bowl was the best part of my summer. I enjoyed putting together the halftime show and I was sad to leave but hopefully there will be more years to come. It was truly a remarkable experience. Thanks for everything. Sincerely, Austin Olathe Northwest High School Olathe, Kansas continued on page 28 WINTER

28 MAKING A DIFFERENCE KMF Band Camp Roars On Towards 40 continued from page 27 that the real reason for their week of hard work snapped into focus: everything they had done and would do during band camp week was most definitely FOR THE KIDS! And needless to say, all of the band s performances for the East-West Shrine Bowl Banquet, during the pre-game and halftime shows, and during the parade itself were, as we have come to expect from the Kansas Masonic All-State Marching Band, both terrific and exciting to watch. One of Doug s staff members noted that in his five years of helping to direct band camp bands, he had never seen a band that got good as fast as this one did. And due to the way the parade was configured this year, a special unplanned bonus was provided for the football players, who got an unplanned chance to see the band play from a much shorter distance than has been typical in the past, and their reactions to the experience as it was happening made it clear that they were impressed, especially during the band s performance of Pittsburg State s distinctive War Chant. This year s band director, Doug Whitten, put it very well: Participating in the Masonic Band is a great way to make lifelong friends and perform in an excellent ensemble while serving a charitable cause. For many, the Kansas Masonic Band experience was the best five days of their lives. With the inspiration of giving deserving kids an experience like that while yet more importantly, making as much money as possible for the Shrine Hospitals for Kids is it any wonder that every year of band camp seems to get better than the one before. Adviser Troy Bosserman put it very well Dear Kansas Masons, Thank you so much for inviting me to the Kansas Masonic High School Camp this year in Pittsburg, KS. We ended the week with a parade and a pre and half-time show at the Shrine Bowl last Saturday. I can t even express how rewarding this experience was! I learned so much and made life-long friends I hope to see again. Even while working hard every day, everyone from the Directors to the Volunteers made the camp unforgettable. I met band members from schools I didn t even know existed and can honestly say I have never met a more friendly and helpful group of people. Learning the songs and motions for the show was something I thoroughly enjoyed! It was great to see people from all walks of life come together for such a great cause. Until this camp, I had heard of the Shriners but I didn t know what all they do for people. I know now how much they do for kids. They really must be an organization that is dedicated to making the world a better place! I know they did mine! Sincerely, Lilly Louisburg High School Louisburg, Kansas in a Facebook post he made on the Kansas Masonic All-State High School Marching Band s timeline just a few days after this year s camp ended, and it appears here in nearly the same freewheeling form that he wrote it in, so that the power of his enthusiasm is not lost: I have been an Adviser at Masonic Band Camp for 6 years and this has been by far the BEST ONE YET! THANK YOU, Bob Shively, Director of the Kansas Masonic Foundation, and to all of the Band Camp Advisers. But most of all, thank you to all the MEMBERS OF THE 2014 MARCHING BAND, and to the Pitt State Band Staff, for a job WELL DONE!!!!!!!!!! Troy is definitely right. This year s camp was a very special one, but there is no reason that the 2015 camp can t be every bit as special or that next year s version can t include you and your lodge and that s true whether you ve ever been involved before or not. A total of 133 Kansas Lodges sponsored one or more students this year, but there s no reason that number can t rise even higher next year, when the East-West Shrine Bowl returns to Fort Hays State University. But no matter how good it gets, the Kansas Masonic All-State High School Marching Band Camp will never be all it can be without you. So why not start planning now to get your Lodge more involved in 2015 than it s ever been before? 28 THE KANSAS MASON

29 MAKING A DIFFERENCE By Hugh W. Gill, Attorney, Hinkle Law Firm LLC Planing Your Estate Now Makes Sense You may not be aware, but you currently have an estate plan in place, whether or not you designed it yourself. Each state, including Kansas, has a plan for what will happen to a person s property if they die without a plan of their own. Relying on the state s default rules, called intestacy, is not consistent with what most people want. However, by choosing to create an estate plan, you give yourself control over many aspects of what happens in the event of death or incapacity. You can control who gets what, when they get it, how much they get, and under what conditions they will get your property. You can also choose to include charities in your plan, which is not included in the state s plan for you. When you choose to plan, you will also get to choose the fiduciaries, including the trustee of a trust and the executor of a will, who will handle your affairs after your death or incapacity. Additionally, you can choose who will make financial and health care decisions for you should you become incapacitated. If you have minor children, you can also nominate who will act as their guardian and conservator. Choosing to plan now will also save time and money in the long run. By appointing your own fiduciaries, you can save on costly administrative expenses after your death. Additionally, if you become incapacitated, you would save time by having already nominated your fiduciaries as opposed to a court appointing them for you. If you choose to use a revocable trust, you can also avoid costly probate court expenses following your death. As a member of Hinkle Law Firm LLC s trusts and estates practice group, Mr. Gill uses his extensive experience in business and tax matters to lead the probate and trust administration needs of the group. He is primarily responsible for guardianships and conservatorships, disability planning, post-mortem tax planning, and marital agreements. He also assists clients with estate planning, asset protection, business entity formation, and business succession planning. While a student at the University of Kansas and the University of Kansas School of Law, Hugh was the recipient of a number of awards, including the Payne & Jones Award and the Wall Street Journal Award for the top M.B.A. student in finance. Today, he frequently lectures on estate planning and estate administration topics. He has been recognized by Best Lawyers in America and Kansas/Missouri Super Lawyers. AROUND THE WORLD Midwest Conference of Grand Lodges Far Exceeds Expectations continued from page 24 to be achieving at that, too. We left the conference better educated, and whenever we shared aspects of our vision, it was always well received. While at the conference, I was fortunate enough to meet many Brothers who provided me with their state lapel pins. One Brother said he did not have one with him to give me but would send me one. He asked for my address and wrote it down on a napkin. I thought that was a nice gesture, but that nothing else would come from it. Then that Thursday, I got a package in the mail, and in it was a lapel pin from his state: a true example of a Brother following up on his word. I sent a thank-you note, and we have a continued our correspondence to this day. I enjoyed the trip a great deal and would certainly suggest that whenever space is available, at least one non-progressive line officer like me should be given the chance to go to these conferences each year. It truly allows you to see the Big Picture, and it is refreshing to know that we are all working together to keep our beautiful institution thriving. I am very thankful to have been afforded the opportunity to attend this year. I have brought what I learned there back to my Lodge in Clay Center, and we are a demonstrably better Lodge for it. And isn t that what a Masonic trip like this is all about? Masonry is alive and well in the Midwest and Canada and will continue, not only to survive, but to flourish WINTER

30 MAKING A DIFFERENCE By Kansas Masonic Foundation Staff ANNUAL FREEMASON S AUCTIONS add NEW GEMS to Annual Communication s Among the many pleasant surprises that this year s Annual Communication featured back in March was an event so successful that it was instantly transformed into a yearly feature, namely, the Annual Freemason s Endowment Charity Auction. It was established to benefit a fund administered by both the Grand Lodge and Kansas Masonic Foundation, which is aimed at helping Masons, their families, and also orphans when they need it most. A wide array of stand-out items sold for impressive sums, ranging from gold pocket watches, to unique Masonic Aprons to once-in-a-lifetime trips to select destinations all across the continental United States and beyond. Over $45,000 was raised an amazing total for a first-time event of the kind. But because time really does fly, enough time has already gone by that we re already soon to be closer to the next Annual Communication than we are to the one that is already fading into the past s Annual Freemason s Endowment Charity Auction promises to be Vintage Fire Chief Pedal Car AMF 503 pedal car in great unrestored condition, complete with original bell, stenciling, tires and hubcaps. Pedal, wheels, steering are in good working order. Some very minor scratches which do not distract from beautiful condition. Marked AMF, Olney, Ill, USA. Donated by Topeka Lodge No. 17 Boxed Arrowhead Collection Excellent example of Native American history, 50 arrowheads beautifully displayed in a light oak colored collector s box (red background). Suitable for any case collection or wall mount display. Many hard-to-find sizes and shapes. A must for any collector! 30 THE KANSAS MASON REVIEW THE LIST BELOW TO LEARN ABOUT THE ITEMS DONATED EARLY, Boxed Arrowhead Collection Excellent display of 45 arrowheads in walnut collector s box (blue background). Assortment includes unique shapes, sizes and composition, making a nice presentation of Native American history. Suitable for any case collection or to mount as beautiful wall display. Blue Lodge Shrine Eastern Star Working Tools Meerschaum Pipe. Handsome Masonic Pipe that is unique and quality made. Donated by Lyn Beyer An 8-Day and 7-Night Unbelievable Trip to Maui, Hawaii Lodging and airfare for two are provided for a trip of a lifetime. From its heavenly beaches to its scenic natural wonders, there are plenty of reasons why Maui has been voted Best Island by readers of Conde Nast Traveler for nineteen years. Donated by Mike Tavares 1905 Elgin Finger Bridge Masonic Theme Dial Watch This is an open face pocket watch. Watch is stem/wind & stem/set in excellent running condition Waltham 17 Jewel Masonic Theme Dial Watch This is an open face pocket watch with an Alaska silver case. Original enamel dial. Excellent running condition Elgin Octagonal Fancy Open Face Case Masonic Style Pocket Watch Movement 17 Jewel in excellent running condition. Gold color and crystal glass. Collectors timepiece. Antique Limoges France Personalized Masonic Shaving Mug Unusual Shaving Mug that is signed T&V Limoges France on the bottom in green dated A rare find! $500 Cash Donation Donated by Smithton Lodge No. 1, AF&AM 2 Masonic Tables and Two Lamps Made out of oak with grain going towards the center, includes masonic emblems that are walnut. The tables are 24 ½ inches wide by 27 inches high, and includes a bottom shelf. Lamps are 13 inches high, with a gray lamp shade and light dimmer. Unique and beautifully handmade and donated by Don Robinette, PGM. One Soldier s Story Personally signed by the author, Senator Robert Dole, directly into the book. By Eastern Press. This is a collector s item that is priceless. Donated by Senator Robert Dole $250 Retail Premier Design Jewelry Donated by Angela Herrman

31 even bigger and better, and next year s goal is to raise $75,000 for the still extremely worthy cause of helping out the Masons who need it most. Next year s auction will feature some new wrinkles, like the offering of a few early items to get all Kansas Masons and Lodges to participate, as well as the addition of some Crown online-only items, which even Masons who simply cannot attend have the same chance to win as the lucky ones who do, as well as a number of onsite silent auction items and at least fifteen highly desirable live auction items. All told, every Mason in Kansas will have at least one way to get involved and participate, via donation, bidding or both in the very next Annual Freemason s Endowment Charity Auction. As bidders, of course, you are strongly encouraged to bid generously, since your willingness to do so will help make this event as helpful to the deserving Masons who benefit from the auction as it can possibly be. But how can suitable donation items be chosen? The best brief answer is that they should be things that you yourself find meaningful and valuable, yet are willing to part with perhaps some piece of memorabilia, or something of larger significance that represents your status or career it s really up to you, but everything the KMF receives for the auction will be greatly appreciated. Since you ll be selling to brother Masons and their families, the element of trickery that too often plays a part in non-masonic online auction offerings will be missing here, and all involved will strive to provide all bidders, whether online or in person, with things they will be happy to have won. And since, as already discussed, the proceeds go to a very good cause, serving to make life easier for brothers and their families in need, everybody involved winds up a winner all the way around, especially since your contribution is tax deductible. In addition, you will further benefit from the exposure of your name to those who attend the Second Annual Freemason s Endowment Charity Auction next March. Donors will be listed in the event program, the merchandise you donate will be on full display at the auction, and as a donor, you ll be invited to attend the event itself, which could easily lead to you meeting prospective customers not to mention that when the bidding starts, you may well discover some bargains of your own! So why not begin planning to support the next Annual Freemason s Endowment Charity Auction right now through your donations, your bids, and if at all possible, your presence? It will be here before you know it, so please start saving the dates of the 159th Annual Communication today: March 19th -21st, AS A GREAT EXAMPLE AND INSPIRATION FOR DONATION IDEAS Original Handcrafted Gavel Made for M:.W:.Michael A. Halleran, by Tony Borum. Donated by M:.W:. Michael A. Halleran and Tony Borum Custom Made Past Masters Apron Hand stitched with gold bullion thread on lamb skin. This gorgeous black and gold apron will be customized for the winner with the name of the Lodge of their choice. Donated by Timothy Fowler. Set of Fantastic Books These nine books were written by Carl A. Otto, a Mason of 67 years, who never started writing until after he lost his wife of 54+ years. The books contain many true stories about his life as well as many stories of events which have had a profound effect on his way of thinking. You will find that he has a way with words. Set of Four Masonic Knives Super collection! W.R. Case & Sons Cutlery Co. Includes Leather Pouch, Tip Can. Made in the U.S.A. Includes Cutlery Display Box, made in the U.S.A. Frost Cutlery MAS In Search of More Light, Free and Accepted Mason, 3 1/2 inch closed, stainless steel blade, Blue and White Smooth Bone Handle, Masonic Shield, Made in China. Frost Cutlery-MAS-165WBW, 3 12 inch closed, High Quality Polished Stainless Steel Blade, Nickel Silver Bolsters, Brass Pins and Liners, White Blue Smooth Bone with Masonic Shield Handle. Millennium Mark Masonic Tokens A fantastic collection of Scottish friendship tokens that are Mark Tokens that Masonic friends exchange and collect. The collection consists of six tokens of the various Masonic Orders. Donated by James L. Jack, P.M., Secretary, Immediate Provincial Grand Master 4 One Day Passes to the Walnut Festival - Donated by Winfield Lodge #110,AF&AM. The Walnut Valley Festival was honored in 1999 by the International Bluegrass Music Association being the first to receive the first ever IBMA Bluegrass Event of the Year award. Every 3rd weekend of September annually, it endeavors to produce family fare entertainment on 4 states simultaneously, a large quality, juried arts and crafts fair, workshops, and acoustic instrument contests. The festival attendance draws 11,000 to 15,000 people annually. Don t miss this great family event. The festival is located in Winfield, Kansas. Donated by Winfield Lodge No. 404, AF&AM Masonic Knife - Rare and unique. Donated by St. Francis Lodge No. 404, AF&AM Dinner with Grand Master and Registration for 2015 Leadership Conference This fun package includes dinner for two with the Grand Master on Saturday, October 31, one night lodging at the Capitol Plaza Hotel in Topeka, Kansas, buffet breakfast for two, registration to the 2015 Leadership Conference for a Kansas Mason and his Lady. Donated by Daren Kellerman AF&AM Kansas Art Piece A unique carved and etched, Ancient Free & Accepted Masons of Kansas, emblem art piece. This piece is framed and enclosed in glass to protect this quality art piece. A Straight Grain Handmade Briar Pipe with square & compass carved on the face. Made by Bob Gilbert a Mason from Denton, Texas. Donated by Lyn Beyer WINTER

32 MAKING A DIFFERENCE By Kansas Masonic Foundation Staff The KMF Announces Charitable Gift Annuities: A GREAT NEW WAY TO GIVE As some of you may have already learned by mail, all the preparations are now complete, and the Kansas Masonic Foundation is happy You can establish to announce a new and even better an annuity with a way to support your Kansas Masonic Foundation--Charitable Gift Annuities. Please look elsewhere in minimum gift of $10,000. The minimum age for a donor to establish a gift annuity is 65 years or this magazine for a brochure that older. This option is most appropriate for explains the program in more older beneficiaries who are looking for a detail, and if you d like to know fixed income payment. KMF follows the more, simply detach and mail the rates established and approved last page of that brochure, which by The American Council serves as a large postage-free postcard, directly to the foundation for even on Gift Annuities. more facts on exactly how well this valuable new program can work for you. As the brochure mentions, many find the idea of a fixed income from a charitable gift annuity attractive, but would rather not start getting that income right away. The new KMF Charitable Gift Annuity is perfect for people like that, since it lets them make a gift immediately and yet set whatever future date they might like to start receiving the income. Even better, by delaying that income for a year or more, the giver will gain both a higher gift annuity rate and a higher tax deduction. And all the receiver of that income has to do is reach at least 65 years of age when the payments start it really is that simple. So please look for the enclosed brochure that came with this issue of The Kansas Mason and mail in the request for more information right away or just contact Ms. Diane McDermed at the Kansas Masonic Foundation Office by phone ( ) or to learn more about this exciting new giving opportunity. We re very excited about it here at the KMF, and we know you will be, too. WHAT BENEFITS DO PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS GET? The satisfaction of supporting only those areas of KMF giving that mean the most to them; A fixed lifetime income for as many as two beneficiaries; Relief from upfront capital gains taxes on gifts of long-term appreciated property; Lower federal estate taxes; An immediate charitable income tax deduction; AND MUCH MORE. Lyn E. Beyer, GSW presents check to KMF President Michael A. Tavares at KMF Board of Trustees Meeting Kansas Mason Raises $8,500+ for Kansas Masonic Foundation Lyn Beyer, Grand Senior Warden, raised more than $8,500 for Cancer Research at the Bobbe Beyer Memorial Tournament, held September 10, 2014 at Prairie Highlands Golf Course in Olathe, Kansas. The tournament is presented annually by Cigar and Tabac, Ltd., owned by Lyn Beyer. Called the Golf Classic for its first five years, the tournament s name was changed this year to the Bobbe Beyer Memorial Tournament, in honor of Bobbe, who lost her fight to brain cancer in February of golfers played in this, the tournament s sixth year; the event was sponsored by numerous individuals and businesses, and also featured a live auction to raise additional funds, which significantly elevated the final total the Tournament raised. All proceeds will be earmarked by the Kansas Masonic Foundation for the KU Cancer Research Center. 32 THE KANSAS MASON

33 By Kansas Masonic Foundation Staff IT S ALWAYS AUCTION TIME AT THE KMF! The First Annual Kansas Masonic Lodge Online Auction was held from August 15th to September 15th of this year and proved to be a terrific success. A surprising number of items sold almost instantly for their Buy It Now! Prices, and the overall success of the auction was all that could be hoped for, particularly for the firstever version of a brand-new Masonic event. Seventy items were sold from Lodges all over the state, with 75% of the proceeds from each sale going to the Lodge where it originated and 25% going to the new Freemason s Endowment a fund kicked off at this year s Annual Communication that exists solely to aid Masons and their wives and children, as well as orphans, in their times of need. Many unique items were made available during the auction, including these: three sets of four linked, Vintage Theatre Seats, all in great condition; a Three Day/Three Night White Tail Deer Hunt or Goose/Duck hunt; A Guided Tour of Downtown Burlington, hosted by that city s Mayor; a Baikal IJ-70 (Makarov) Pistol and a Diamond Back DB 380 Semi-Automatic.380 Pistol; a striking and realistic depiction of George Washington Opening a Lodge Meeting; a Pheasant Hunt For Two; a Set of Amazing Books, written by Carl Otto, a Mason of 67 years; a Set of Solid Native American Walnut Shelves; a Rare Antique Cabinet-Style New Home AHC Sewing Machine with accessories; a Bushel Neo-XS Golf GPS Rangefinder; a Masonic Knife and Sheath; a wide variety of other rare and appealing Masonic memorabilia items, a 1920 Beckwith Player Piano that plays everything from gospel to polka and beyond and much, much more! Don Wheeler, Secretary of Vulcan Lodge (whose wonderful Traveling Gavel was written up in the Summer 2014 issue of The Kansas Mason), represents one of a number of Lodges that was quick to make great use of this new auction-based fundraising opportunity, and the attractive three gavel set they contributed to this year s auction sold soon after it went on sale. Don spoke for many when he had this to say: The online auction this year was great for us. Our Lodge made a nice chunk of money very easily that we were happy to have for the causes we support, and I m sure I m not alone when I say that I hope the Kansas Masonic Foundation decides to make this new Lodge auction an annual event. After seeing what other Lodges are doing, I ve come up with a couple of unique ideas for next year. It s the biggest no work, easy payout fund raiser that we could do. I think we will raise $500 to $1,000 for our Lodge next year, just with the ideas that I already have. And Don s brother, Dustin Wheeler, Master of Vulcan Lodge, made an important addition: I think this is the best of the many good ideas that KMF has had. Many Lodges are struggling with funds right now, so this is a very easy way to generate some much-needed money. Several unique items sold this year that I m sure generated enough interest all by themselves to justify making this an annual event, and I m sure that even more new and intriguing items will appear in the years ahead. As beautiful as they were, I m surprised that the gavels Kirk Hart made sold so quickly, which just testifies to how well the auction idea works. Here s hoping that the KMF and the Grand Lodge can keep their good work going and continue to make Kansas Masonry the best that it can be. 75% OF THE PROCEEDS FROM EACH SALE GOING TO THE LODGE WHERE IT ORIGINATED AND 25% GOING TO THE NEW FREEMASON S ENDOWMENT WINTER

34 MEMBER INTERVIEW continued from page 23 I truly believe that working to understand the ritual(s), the Biblical references, and the education as well as enjoying the fellowship and friendship of my Brother Masons has all been beneficial to me. What do you look for when you attend lodge meetings? I look for a variety of things; I believe we each get out of a lodge meeting what we put into it while we are there. I look for education I always want to learn from the program or presentation. I strive to leave each meeting with a better understanding of some aspects(s) of Freemasonry and how Masonic principles and values apply to my daily life. I look for and cherish the fellowship and friendship of my Brethren, both at the pre-lodge dinner at a local pub and during the meetings themselves. So in brief, I look for education, friendship, and better self-awareness. What do you see as the future of Freemasonry? I believe the future of Freemasonry is strong, yet challenged. We are a fraternity of men of the highest caliber and values, who are members of an ancient and storied Brotherhood that is at once ritualistic and secretive, yet built on respect, honor, and brotherly love, despite that mystique. There are no other groups that surpass our values, principles, and worth, both to our Brothers and to their communities. Yet as a group, we still face the challenges of rising expenses and declining memberships. We will need to continually analyze our situation and fully understand that we may need to do more with less if we are to maintain our fraternity and its ability to have a markedly positive impact on our members and their communities. In our technologically advanced society, I believe we will need to continue to develop and advance our Lodge communication styles, and maybe even the media type(s) used during our rituals. That said, I believe that Masonry will still continue to evolve and prosper in ways that help us meet the needs of our members, both new and old. We will continue to provide fellowship and Masonic education, while always remaining highly structured as an organization that has always been and still remains veiled in ritual and mystique. I actually look forward to the opportunities and challenges that we will face in the years to come, since I know that it is our very identity and training as Masons that will ultimately give us all the tools we need, not only to survive, but to flourish. Kansas Masonic Foundation offers CHARITABLE GIFT ANNUITIES Your Kansas Masonic Foundation has a charitable gift annuity program that has attractive rates and possible tax advantages. For many people, establishing a fixed income from a charitable gift annuity is a very attractive financial plannnig option. RECEIVE THE BENEFITS OF Fixed lifetime income for up to two beneficiaries. Satisfaction in supporting an area of KMF that is important to you. An immediate charitable income tax deduction. Reduced federal estate taxes. Kansas Masonic Foundation, Inc THE KANSAS MASON

35 LODGE OF RESEARCH By Rick Carver, Shawnee Lodge No. 54 & Inner Quest No. 456 Enabling The Masonic Explorer In All Of Us. Kansas Lodge of Research was established in 1982 to conduct research, gather and preserve Masonic information, supply speakers, and enhance Grand Lodge endeavors to promote Masonic Education. This is the second in a series of articles written for the research lodge and published in Kansas Mason magazine. If you have a topic of interest specific to the in-lodge experience that you would like to see examined here or on which you have already written your findings, please contact us at or see our web page at kansasmason.org. Examining the Working Tools The Plumb, the Level & the Square Knowledge is not power; it is inventory. Knowledge must be applied before it can empower. As Freemasons advance through the three degrees, they are shown representations of the Working Tools of Operative Masonry that are metaphorically explained as it being representative of something a Mason should do and be in daily life. As Speculative Masons, few of us have an opportunity to apply the Working Tools to actual stone, and we miss an opportunity to see the Light their Operative uses provide. To explore this, let us first examine the three Working Tools used to represent the three principle officers of the Lodge: the Plumb, the Level and the Square. It is by no coincidence that these tools are those of a Fellow Craft. These are the three tools that are commonly used collectively by the Fellow Craft guild to do most of the Operative Work. Much, but not all, of their Operative usage is self-evident. We are told the Plumb is used to check upright Work and is to teach us to deal in an upright manner with others. The Level is used to true horizontal Work and serves to remind us that the Level of Time on which we travel is finite. The Square is to be used to square the corners of Work so each stone will be better made able to be Plumb and/or Level. The Square also serves to remind us that we should be square in our dealings with others. Each of these explanations is somewhat lacking and is deserving of further investigation. THE PLUMB We learn that the Junior Warden is represented by the Plumb and also by the Pillar of continued on page 36 WINTER

36 LODGE OF RESEARCH continued from page 35 Beauty. It is the Tool of Alignment. It further alludes to Hiram Abiff and the due-guard of the First Degree. It is used to vertically align the stone above with the stone below as Above, so Below. By applying the Plumb to the stone above the stone below it will show leanings or uprightness in construct. Fig.i The word Plumb is from the Latin Plumbum, meaning lead. It is a tool consisting of one or more vertical flat edges with a small ball of lead suspended on a string that is allowed to freely move on a pendulum axis. The accuracy of the Plumb is not selfreliant and must be assured by calibration, comparison and registration against a known standard. A mark is then engraved noting the exact position where the string shows a perfect perpendicular. Other marks may also be applied that represent the amount of error from True Plumb, but they are only for reference and convenience and are thus superfluous. When the Plumb (Junior Warden) is missing, Masons (the Lodge) can recreate it by the use of the Level and the Square. By aligning the Level upon one leg of the Square and rotating it until the registration mark on the Level is true, the other leg of the Square is Plumb and thus perpendicular to the surface of the Work to which this combination of tools is applied. (See fig. 1) This substitution of tools teaches us that when the Beauty of Uprightness and Honesty is missing, Masons can rely on Strength and Wisdom to provide a solution so the Work can continue in harmony. THE LEVEL The Senior Warden is represented by the Level and also by the Pillar of Strength. It is further emblematic of Equality, Hiram King of Tyre and the due-guard of the Third Degree. It is used to prove Horizontals. These Horizontals are the foundation to which the equality between Masons and others may occur in fairness. As the Level, a Mason must bring all his parts into balance to assure Equality. Fig.ii In Latin, Libra was a balance and from it came our Level as an instrument by which a balance is provided, or by which a horizontal plane might be proven. It is a tool consisting of a flat horizontal edge with a small ball of lead suspended on a string that is allowed to freely move on a pendulum axis. The accuracy of the Level must also be assured by calibration, comparison and registration against a known standard. A mark is then engraved noting the exact point where the string shows a perfectly level surface. Other marks may also be applied that represent the amount of error from True Level, but they are only for reference and convenience and are thus superfluous. When the Level (Senior Warden) is missing, Masons (the Lodge) can recreate it by the use of the Plumb and the Square. By aligning the Plumb upon one leg of the Square and rotating it until the registration mark on the Plumb is true, the other leg of the Square is Level and thus parallel to the surface of the Work to which this combination of tools is applied. (See fig. ii) This substitution of tools teaches us that when the Strength of Fairness and Equality are missing, Masons can rely on Beauty and Wisdom to manifest a solution so the Work can continue in harmony. This exercise proves the harmony of The Three yet exists when only two are present. It further dovetails with our Grand Lodge By-Laws that stipulate which Lodge Officers 36 THE KANSAS MASON

37 must be present in order to conduct a regu- of Water and Fire. Add them into our draw- lar and proper Stated Communication. ing, each at the appropriate juncture of the THE SQUARE FIRE AIR Elements that form them. (See fig. vi) This leaves the zenith of the circle where The Square is an emblem of Morality and is Air meets Fire to yet have a wage defined. representative of the Worshipful Master, the Pillar of Wisdom, King Solomon and the due- WATER EARTH Classical Alchemy tells us that the composite of these two elements results in a crystal guard of the Second Degree. It also alludes to the esoteric, and may be linked to reveal- Fig.v or salt. History tells us that salt was often used as currency (payment) in ancient times ing the secret of the Master s Wages. Fig.iv How many times have we sat in Lodge and heard the Square defined as an angle of 90 degrees and the forth part of a circle? The angle of 90 degrees portion seems fairly self-evident, but why would someone choose to define a right angle using a circle? The answer becomes a bit more apparent when it is drawn. Begin by drawing a circle and dividing it into 4 equal parts. (See fig.iv) often used as a key to the esoteric. Add them into our quartered circle. (See fig. v) We have learned that the Wages of the Fellow Craft are Corn, Wine and Oil. These wages would allow a man to sustain himself in meager comfort, but little more. Yet, it is said that the Master s Wage is such that it grants him excess whereby he is able to travel and to contribute to the relief of others. Alchemists chronicled Corn as the composite of Air and Earth, Wine the composite of Earth and Water, and Oil the composite and was regarded to be of great value as a preserving agent. Salt made it possible to preserve food for longer periods of time, as would be necessary to allow travel. I propose for your consideration that in addition to Corn, Wine and Oil, the Master s Wage was paid in Salt. Still not convinced? How about this: salt originates from the Latin root sāl of which formed the word salary, which literally means continued wages. While the Plumb and Level are quite similar, the Square stands alone in both uniqueness and in its difficulty to replicate in another form. A proper and Perfect Square requires no calibration or registration marks. Once proven accurate, a The ancient Alchemists believed that all things abounded from four elements the Clas- OIL FIRE AIR CORN Perfect Square remains so without further interpretation. Many representations of Masonic Squares sical Elements: Earth, Wind, Fire WATER EARTH contain various scales of measure and Air. They believed all things applied to the legs, but these are were one of these elements alone as of convenience to the craftsman or resulted from a combination or composite of them. These Classical Elements are and are not integral to the ability of the WINE Fig.vi continued on page 38 WINTER

38 LODGE OF RESEARCH continued from page 37 Fig.vii Square to prove an angle of 90. (See fig, vii) The modern Square is often oblong and may have varying widths of each leg. When the Apprentice has not done The Work, he is like this Oblong Square. Apprentice Work trues your Square, sets your Plumb and lengthens your Level. Only when he has done The Work of the first two Degrees will he become the Perfect Square. (See fig, viii) When the Square (Worshipful Master) is missing, Masons (the Lodge) can create a representation of it by the use of the Plumb and the Level. By aligning the Plumb across one leg of the Level and rotating it until both registration marks are true, a Square is manifest. (See fig, ix) This provides a poor, time consuming substitute and serves to further emphasize the need for the presence of a strong Worshipful Master. This substitute tool serves to teach us that when Wisdom appears to be missing, Masons can rely on Beauty and Strength to provide a solution so the Work can continue in harmony. Fig.viii Fig.ix About The Author Rick Carver is the Past Master of Inner Quest Lodge 456 (Traditional Observance) and current Secretary and perpetual life member of Shawnee Lodge 54. He is also a member of Scottish Rite, York Rite, Kansas Lodge of Research and several other Masonic organizations. You can read some other works by Brother Carver on the Inner Quest Lodge web site at innerquest456.org. Acknowledgement The author would like to again thank Dr. John S. Nagy and his books Building Hiram and Building Perpends for his many contributions, inspiration and guidance in this endeavor. Please note the use of the word may in this statement. It is my intent to provide a plausible and logical definition of a Master s Wage, however it is the opinion of this author only and it is not approved, sanctioned or recognized by The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Kansas or any other Masonic order. 38 THE KANSAS MASON

39 HOME WARMINGS Celebrating Our Accomplishments Along the Way By Matthew Bogner, CEO, Kansas Masonic Home As we celebrate the opening of our first long term care household, I thought it would be a good time to reflect on the past and how far we have come in our effort to provide true home to residents at Kansas Masonic Home. The Pavilion Healthcare Center has always been the heart and soul of the project. Six years ago, our planning process started specifically as a way to transform the institutional physical environment as well as the internal way care is provided. By partnering with national consultants, residents, staff members and family members our dreams quickly incorporated plans for the assisted living Towers and Manor as well. We also added a rapid recovery household for short term therapy residents. For me, the past six years seemed to move slowly at times as we secured financing, finished planning and prepared for construction to begin. It is somewhat surreal to think that by the end of the first quarter next year our campus-wide All of you who have supported our transformation have contributed to this new FEELING OF PEACE, SECURITY AND SANCTUARY. renovation will be complete! I would like to thank those of you who have helped to make this dream a reality. Your financial support and moral support have been instrumental in achieving this vision. I also wrote a special letter of thanks to our staff members recently who have worked through the construction process. As you can imagine, it is difficult to work in a physical environment that is being dramatically transformed. Harder still has been the internal transformation of positions, duties, systems and decision making processes in an attempt to return resident choice, autonomy and self determination. However, all of this hard work has improved the lives of countless individuals that will call KMH their home. I will leave you with a true story that occurred last week at KMH. I was on my way to check on residents and staff members in the new household and a family member caught me in the hall. He told me that his loved one always talks about visits back home to their house in the outside community. They go on these outings occasionally to enjoy the feel, scent and comfort of home but must always return back here in the end. However, upon moving into the new Victorian house the conversation abruptly changed. For the first time his loved one turned to him and said, Should we go to your home today or should we stay at my home? Between you and me, that is what we have been working for all of these years. It seems simple and it is simple but difficult to achieve. All of you who have supported our transformation have contributed to this new feeling of peace, security and sanctuary. You should be proud in knowing that you have achieved something far greater than yourself. You should also know that each time a community like ours transforms it pushes others to transform as well. Hopefully some day, all communities serving seniors will become true home. WINTER

40 HOME WARNINGS CREDIT Kansas Department of Commerce TAX CREDIT Program By Kansas Masonic Home Staff Kansas Masonic Home (KMH) has been selected as a recipient of the Kansas Department of Commerce (KDOC) Tax Credit Program for The KDOC Tax Credit Program provides significant benefits to donors. In short, donors receive a state tax credit in return for a gift to KMH. HOW IT WORKS? You make a Tax Deductable (Federal Tax not State) contribution to the eligible 501 (C) 3 non-profit. The State of Kansas does not provide a deduction for charitable contributions. The federal government does provide a deduction for charitable contributions. Your individual deduction is based upon your annual income and other factors. The non-profit provides you with a state tax credit for 50% of the amount of your gift. Tax Credit Example Married, Joint return Federal income taxes Income 50, , , ,000 Other itemized deductions 12,000 12,000 12,000 12,000 State taxes 1,711 4,740 10,799 22,918 Contribution 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 Total deduction 14,711 17,740 23,799 35,918 Taxable income 35,289 82, , ,082 Marginal tax rate 15% 25% 28% 35% Federal tax 5,293 20,565 49, ,429 Tax benefit of contribution at marginal tax rate YOU FILE THAT TAX CREDIT ON YOUR STATE INCOME TAX RETURN. If your total credit is more than you owe then you receive a refund for the difference. Simple Example You make a $1,000 contribution to Kansas Masonic Home. You receive a standard federal deduction of $300 (based on your annual income and other factors). You receive a 50% credit of $500 towards your Kansas tax liability. Your out of pocket expense equals approximately $200. Simply stated: $1,000 - $300 (federal) - $500 (state) = $200 (out of pocket). DISCLAIMER: Kansas Masonic Home is not a tax advising entity. The information in this document was prepared by Kansas Masonic Home. Prior to making any tax decisions we encourage you to consult a tax advisor to ensure your potential benefits from this program. State income taxes Federal taxable income 35,289 82, , ,082 Add back Contribution deduction 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 State taxable income 36,289 83, , ,082 State marginal rate 6.45% 6.45% 6.45% 6.45% State tax 2,341 5,370 11,429 23,548 State credit for CSP contribution Net taxes due 1,841 4,870 10,929 23,048 Contribution amount 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 Tax benefit of Federal deduction Less: Loss of Federal deduction (75) (125) (140) (175) at Marginal Federal rate Tax credit for Kansas Less: Loss of Kansas deduction (65) (65) (65) (65) at Kansas tax rate Total tax benefits Net out of pocket For more information please contact Robert Roswurm at (316) or 40 THE KANSAS MASON

41 HOME WARNINGS Kansas Masonic Home Award Winners! By Kansas Masonic Home Staff I m pleased to announce that two Kansas Masonic Home staff members have won LeadingAge Kansas Quality First Awards of Excellence. LeadingAge Kansas is an association of over 160 not-for-profit aging services providers dedicated to serving the needs of aging Kansans. They advance policies and promote practices that empower members to help seniors live fully as they age. LeadingAge Kansas members serve over 20,000 seniors in Kansas each day. Each year the association selects the best leaders and programs from among their membership and awards them based on eleven categories. We are honored to have won two of these awards this year! Director of Building Services, David Shuman, has won a Lifetime Achievement Award for his 26 years of service at KMH and culture change leadership. David was just 21 years old and fresh out of heating and air conditioning school when a friend recommended him for an entry level job on the maintenance crew of KMH. He got the job and spent most of his early days crawling through tiny tunnels that house the campus water and electrical lines. David quickly distinguished himself as a leader among his peers and a few years later he was promoted to Director of Building Services. David has impacted the field of aging services through his culture change advocacy. According to the Pioneer Network, culture change is the common name given to the national movement for the transformation of older adult services, based on person-directed values and practices. Culture change transformation supports the creation of both long and short-term living environments where both older adults and their caregivers are able to express choice and practice self-determination in meaningful ways at every level of daily life. Culture change transformation requires changes in organizational practices, physical environments, relationships at all levels and workforce models. Over the past six years David has helped to lead the $22 million household model renovation at KMH based on these culture change principles. In addition to his experience with physical redesign, he has also spent weeks training with national consultants about internal system changes and has attended out of state intensives as well. As David has helped to refine the latest in household model design, other culture change leaders have come to tour our households and learn from him as well. David s mentorship of other leaders is a testament to his experience and dedication to improving the way elders are cared for throughout the nation. Wellness Director, Anne Edmiston, has also won an Excellence in Innovation Award for her wellness programming. This award honors individuals whose innovative programs and services focus on improved quality of life and quality of care for elders. The Kansas Masonic Home Wellness Connections program provides a comprehensive approach to encouraging healthy lifestyles for KMH residents. The program combines personal fitness training with basic nutrition Top: David Shuman, Director of Building Service won the Lifetime Achievement Award for his 26 years of service at KMH Bottom: Anne Edmiston Wellness Director won an Excellence in Innovation Award for her wellness programming counseling in a one-on-one person-centered relationship. It is within the bounds of this relationship that residents and the Wellness Director work together to assess their overall personal wellness. This includes identifying risk areas, developing a plan to address those risk areas and working together to accomplish goals set by the residents themselves. Anne and David will receive their awards at the LeadingAge Kansas Fall Conference in Manhattan, Kansas in early October. Please help me to congratulate both David and Anne on their well deserved awards in the weeks ahead! WINTER

42 BOOK REVIEW By Robert G. Davis, 33, G.C., Guthrie, Oklahoma The Bridge Builder s Guide Tutorial for exploring the truths and philosophies of our great work IT PLACES EACH OF US, AS THE CENTRAL CHARACTERS IN ITS DEGREES, ON THE PATH TO IMPROVE OURSELVES AND THE WORLD IN WHICH WE LIVE. One can never have too many resources when it comes to interpreting the lessons embedded within the degrees of the Scottish Rite. There are so many lessons. The Scottish Rite is not called the college course in Freemasonry because it has imposing temples scattered about the urban landscape. It is an advanced field of Masonic study. There are many lessons to be learned. It is a course in principles and situational ethics, comparative religion, the ancient mysteries, the traditions of manhood, and the psychology of being. Like any other knowledge tradition, the value one gains from its lessons expands dramatically as these are applied in life. The Scottish Rite, more than any other fraternal discipline, focuses on the nature of freedom: individual, religious, political, and spiritual liberty. The moral, social, and spiritual development of the individual is the foundational criteria for freedom. Thus, the importance of the Rite should never be taken for granted. The Bridge Builder s Guide is an apt name for the textual path this book offers the student of Masonry. It recognizes one of the greatest challenges the new Scottish Rite Mason encounters: how one goes about studying and thinking about the Degrees of the Rite when he has only an occasional opportunity to observe them. Informational bridges are needed to connect the Mason to the major themes presented in the Rite to help him on his individual path of study toward enlightenment. Brother Ferlemann offers us an excellent tutorial for exploring the truths and philosophies of our great work. Separating Masonic study into its three essential components of ceremonial art, social engineering, and symbolic interpretation is nothing short of brilliant. One has to know what truth is before he can approach a meaningful study of its nature. He has to understand the personal, social, and political messages the Rite conveys to decipher the true nature of liberty. He has to have a grasp of the major themes and characters presented in the Degrees to interpret the applications its ceremonial forms has to him. This study offers the student much foundational information for interpreting the major elements of Scottish Rite philosophy. It provides an important framework for a more efficient and meaningful exploration of the nature of freedom. It helps bridge the gap between the philosophy of ideas and real world application. It places each of us, as the central characters in its Degrees, on the path to improve ourselves and the world in which we live. It is my pleasure to welcome you on Brother Ferlemann s enjoyable journey from whence we came to wither we are travelling. I can assure you it is a bridge worth crossing. 42 THE KANSAS MASON

43 OUT AND ABOUT By James A. Marples, Mulvane Lodge No. 201 The Honeybee as a Symbol of Virtuous Masonic Industry and Ethics Selected excerpts from Marples s Freemasonry, in its capacity as a fraternity of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, has createdvarious symbols, designed to remind the Mason inside and outside of the Lodge of his duties to himself and to mankind. Engaging in noble and industrious endeavors is but one example. Most of the symbols are architectural working-tools, such as the Level, Plumb, Square, Gavel, and other miscellaneous tools used by ancient stonemasons as literal tools {as described in The Holy Bible and other holy writs}, but now also employed as metaphors or inserted as honorable symbolic signs and symbols, used by modern Speculative Freemasons to illustrate more noble and glorious purposes befitting a moral code of conduct, in our modern world. Oddly enough, the Beehive doesn t fit the category of an architectural workingtool yet it has a prominent place in Masonic allegory and symbolism.the noted Masonic scholar, Dr. Albert G. Mackey, M.D., 33º and a Knight Templar, notes that the Beehive was, among the ancient Egyptians, the symbol of an obedient people. Of all the insects, the image of bees buzzing around a beehive was seen as the sign of regulated behavior, when congregated in their hive. He also notes that Freemasonry likewise adopted the Beehive as a symbol of Industry. He notes that new Masons are taught that Master Masons work so that they may receive their wages, the better to support {themselves} and family, and contribute to the relief of worthy distressed Brother Master Masons, and {their} widows, and orphans. Using an analogy, groups of hard-working men who are Masons could be likened to bees. While a Masonic Lodge is essentially the group of men themselves actually, in bygone times, large Masonic Halls were built to accommodate the conferral of Degrees and other activities, as a known hub of activity, quite similar to a Bee-Hive. Various flowers such as the Sunflower are pollinated by honeybees. The State of Kansas is known as the Sunflower State. Furthermore, Sunflower Masonic Lodge No. 86 is located in Wichita, Kansas. In Nebraska, the Sandhills have been another prime growing region for Sunflowers, which are a beautiful crop to see growing in the fields, but cultivated for their seeds and oils. The delicate balance of abundant light and adequate moisture is precisely what sunflowers need to survive. Yet, without bees and pollinators, those plants are similarly dependent. Regardless of where Masons meet, act, and part, I would hope that we always keep the symbolism of The Beehive in our hearts and minds. The Three Great Lights of Masonry are described as The Holy Bible, the Square, and the Compasses. It is essential we retain and teach our symbolism to future generations, since a band of friends and Brothers can accomplish many more good deeds than a single individual can do alone in this world. About the Author: Brother James A. Marples is a Perpetual Life Member of Mulvane Masonic Lodge No. 201, A.F. & A.M., in Mulvane, Kansas (not to mention his numerous other Masonic memberships and titles). He knows more of interest about the history of honeybees profound links to Masonry than we were able to include here, but he had the good fortune of personally presenting Senator Bob Dole with a hard copy of his complete thoughts on the subject at the VFW Hall in Minneapolis, Kansas, just days before sharing them with our readers. We sincerely thank him for this enlightening submission and hope that other Masons will consider submitting articles for publication in The Kansas Mason. WINTER

44 OUT AND ABOUT By Kansas Masonic Foundation Staff Golden Rule Lodge No. 90: Giving Old Gold a New Gleam When he made one of his trademark surprise visits to Kansas Lodges last summer, M.W. Michael Halleran was surprised to discover a full house at Golden Rule No. 90, even though none of the Brothers in attendance had known that the Grand Master would appear. So what was causing enough extra excitement to catch the attention of even the Grand Master? In a word, voting. A vote was being held that evening that would decide if the Lodge went forward with a striking new plan, namely, to renovate and improve its Lodge building, which was already in good shape, in response to the vision of a way to enrich Masonry that was both old and new at once. The Senior Warden of Golden Rule No. 90, Kyle Ferlemann, expressed the shared vision that drove the project this way: We knew if we could create something that looked Masonic and struck a chord, we could give our members an enriched Masonic experience. As Kyle further explained, a factor that went far towards making the project a reality was that this specific remodeling vision was shared by the Lodge as a whole, not just by a few members: I had the time this summer and generous gifts from our members, both living and those who had remembered us in their wills, which helped make the vision a possibility. This work was begun at the pleasure of the Worshipful Master, Jay Hurst, with the enthusiastic consent of the Lodge. I absolutely could not have done this alone. A majority of the work was completed side by side with Matt Gray, with the assistance of Dwight Rumple, who serves as the current Secretary of the Lodge. Our respective skill sets in remodeling and finance met the varied requirements of the project. I should note that Matt is in his first year as a Master Mason. Chris James and Kevin Kesler also helped on the heavy lifting days. So from the very start, the Lodge-wide goal was to intensify its members Masonic experience by making the physical environment of the Golden Rule Lodge Room as conducive to that goal as possible, and key members drew on their areas of maximum expertise to help make the dream a reality. The overall goal was to modernize the Lodge room, by making unobtrusive use of the likes of LED lighting and hidden speakers, the latter capable of handling an This strategic reanimation entailed, orchestral range of sound, while still giving among other things, purchasing 51 new oak the finished room the patina of a bygone chairs (the number dictated by what the age, circa the late 19th to the early 20th room can hold), which were custom made to centuries. By making skillful use of the best fit both the available space and the physical of modern technology, such unseen innovations could help create a heightened version also embodying the same new-made-old vi- requirements of the Lodge members, while of a more traditional look. sual aesthetic that informs the entire project. Before 44 THE KANSAS MASON

45 Kyle did considerable research on the kinds of décor that Lodge Rooms feature, which led to the distinctive style that Golden Rule ultimately chose an intelligently conceived and eclectic pastiche of some of the most attractive aspects of both the Old English and Egyptian/Sumerian influences that tend to characterize most Lodge Rooms. An enabling aspect of the project was the way the Lodge overlooked no opportunity to minimize costs without sacrificing quality. All told, over $14,000 was saved through the likes of discounts and donated labor, and when all such related savings are added in, the Lodge got a $75,000 renovation completed for about half that sum. One key to that triumph of fiscal conservatism in action was the kind of deal the Lodge struck with a local artist, who was willing to create valuable real paintings directly on the walls of the Lodge itself, in place of the evocative posters that had served the purpose before that time. By negotiating a deal wherein she deferred her up-front charges in return for the chance to sell prints of her work later, the Lodge saved thousands of dollars, while still getting the very kinds of artistic improvements that their quest for targeted improvement demanded. The first meeting was held in the newly refurbished Lodge on September 11th of this year. With the exception of a few finishing touches, the work is now complete. In 1953, a flood hit the Golden Rule facilities downtown. The Lodge then met in a school for a number of years, before moving to the present facility in 1988 and time, as always, continues to fly by, leaving the past farther behind with each passing moment. We knew if we could create something that looked Masonic and struck a chord, we could give our members an enriched Masonic experience. But regardless of what the calendar may say, the Brothers of Golden Rule Lodge No. 90 know that thanks to their own bold and proactive action, they have never been closer to what is most golden in their shared Masonic past than they are right now. WINTER

46 OUT AND ABOUT By Kansas Masonic Foundation Staff Gilead Lodge No. 144 Follow Gilead Lodge s Lead Help Put Masonry on the Map USD 366 YATES CENTER Essay Contest for Students the Lodge Gives out Two $100 Cash Awards The Lodge Presents a $500 Scholarship Annually Donates to the After Prom Party Donates to the Art Department Fundraiser The Lodge Sends a Music Student to the Masonic Band Camp Associated with the Kansas Shrine Bowl The Lodge Takes the 3rd Grade Class to a Movie at Christmas The Lodge Purchases Materials with the Woodson County Sheriff s department for the D.A.R.E. Program Our Lodge Cooks the Steaks for the Junior Senior Banquets COMMUNITY Adopt a Child for Christmas Through the Chamber of Commerce (8 Children in 2013) Purchase Livestock Premiums for the Woodson County Fair Sponsor and conduct the Trunk or Treat Halloween Party for the Woodson County Chamber of Commerce Woodson County Resource Council Persons in Need Friends for Life Cancer Victims Assistance Alzheimer s Program for Allen County HOFNOD Hooked on Fishing, Not on Drugs The members of our Lodge mow and clean up the city Fishing Pond for the Kids Fishing Derby and cook hotdogs for the kids on the day of the event. Over the past five years, we have poured a slab, erected a shelter house, and installed picnic tables, with a ramp and rails at this city-owned pond. Our Lodge Provides a Teddy Bear Project for new mothers, administered by the County Health Nurse Our Lodge prepares, repairs, assembles, and maintains the Christmas Display for the Courthouse Lawn As a Lodge and individually, we contribute to the Kansas Masonic Home, the KU Oncology Program, the Kansas Masonic Foundation, and Shrine Hospitals for Children Along with a great deal of other valuable information (as reported elsewhere in this issue), this startling fact emerges from the new Kansas Masonic Foundation General Population Survey: Even though all respondents have heard of the Masons, over six in ten (62%) do not know if there is a Masonic Lodge in their community, or how the Masons contributions to their community compare to other organizations (66%); 18% of respondents feel that Masons contribute about the same amount to their community as other organizations. As Masons know, they quite often contribute more to their respective communities than virtually any other single group. The only problem, as the quotation above highlights, is that those around them and sometimes even those whom they benefit the most do not begin to know how much Masons really do. As the enlightening survey cited above also demonstrates, unless they are somehow prompted, 91% of Kansans are not aware of any programs/funding contributions that Kansas Masons provide in the state (emphasis added). And even when aided, the contributions that people were most frequently aware of, local charity work through Lodges and the East-West Shrine Bowl, were correctly identified by only 16% and 14%, respectively. It s no wonder, then, that people too often fail to see the true value of Masonry and Masonic ideals, when they know so precious little about what it is that Masons really do. Happily, however, some Lodges across the state had already started taking proactive steps in their communities to help remedy the public s lack of knowledge in their communities. One such Lodge is Gilead Lodge No. 144 in Yates Center. They have created a flyer to be shared with contributors that brings anyone who sees it up to speed on all that Gilead Lodge does on an ongoing basis to make the Yates Center area a better place, and as such, it represents exactly the kind of move that Masons all over Kansas need to be making, just to be sure that the people they do so much to serve know something about whom to credit for it. Above, just to provide what is hoped will be a helpful example, are the activities spotlighted on that flyer. If your lodge has ideas on innovative ways to share with the public about how to make the good Masons routinely do better known about, so Masonic light isn t hidden under a bushel in local communities, please submit it for possible future use in The Kansas Mason. 46 THE KANSAS MASON

47 Woodson Lodge No. 121, By Warren Farr Hunts for Future Hunters A small Lodge in Southeast Kansas, composed of only 50 members, has recently discovered a new activity that has produced extraordinary results. Woodson Lodge No. 121 is located in Toronto, Kansas, population 262, nestled in the rolling hills of the Verdigris River Valley, just two miles from the Toronto Reservoir State Park and Wildlife Area, and thirteen miles from Fall River Reservoir State Park and Wildlife Area. Both of these natural areas provide numerous outdoor activities, most notably hunting and fishing. As most of us are aware, to hunt legally in the Sunflower State, Kansas hunting regulations stipulate that individuals born during or after July of 1957 must complete a course in Hunter Education from a licensed and certified instructor and be able to produce a certificate proving as much upon request whenever asked to do those who oversee and enforce our wild game laws. During the January 2012 meeting of Woodson Lodge, WM Brother Larry Hibbard, a lifetime resident of the area, long involved with hunting activities and recognizing the need for area youth, as well as those living in surrounding communities, to obtain Hunter Education, presented a plan to the Brethren that would enable such classes to be conducted at the Lodge location. He had previously contacted the Area Conservation Officer not to mention the Region 5 Office of Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism (KDWPT) in Chanute about possible early spring dates to have Hunter Education classes on Friday evenings and Saturdays. Further research indicated that the Lodge Room could easily and safely accommodate up to 35 students, accompanied by one adult per student. Due to the lack of adequate restaurant facilities in Toronto capable of serving such a large group, and due also to one of the Lodge members owning a large charcoal-fired grille that the Lodge had used on many occasions, the Brethren suggested that they could prepare Saturday lunch for all in attendance each week. Snacks and drinks would be provided by them as well, all at a minimal cost to the Lodge, which, of course, is a non-profit venture. This exciting plan was approved unanimously, and WM Hibbard authorized all involved to make the necessary arrangements right away. In brief, the classes have been a terrific success ever since, thanks to the hard work of all involved. Many classes, often filled to capacity, have already been held, and more are already scheduled for the spring. Attendees have had the added opportunity to assemble directly outside Toronto just after Saturday afternoon testing and certification for the purpose of receiving further instruction from KDWPT Instructors, with regards to the safe handling of many types of hunting equipment, as well to get hands-on experience in safely shooting different calibers of firearms, including instruction in shooting clay targets, proper deer stand techniques, the right way to cross obstacles with equipment, and bow safety. This was all made possible by the landowner, a Lodge brother, on property located adjacent to Toronto. Attendees have been enthusiastic in their praise, and comments like this have been typical: We weren t aware that Masons did things like this. Of all the different places in all of Region 5 where they host Hunter Education, you re the only ones who do so much for the kids. Thank you so much. What a great group of guys! So mote it be. WINTER

48 EVENT CALENDAR October 19 Area 8 Meeting McPherson Lodge No. 172 October year re-dedication of Emporia Lodge No. 12 November 1 Leadership Academy Topeka November 1 Kansas Lodge of Research General Membership Meeting Topeka (Blind Tiger restaurant) November 15 Area 1 Meeting Hiawatha Lodge No. 35 November 15 Masonic Pheasant Hunt Hill City November 20 Table Lodge Parker Lodge No. 341 November Year Re-Dedication of King Solomon Lodge No. 10 Leavenworth December State Masonic Public School Essay Contest Submission Deadline December 27 St. John s Day December 28 Kansas Mason Submission Deadline for Spring Edition January 1 Kansas Masonic Foundation Scholarship Submission Opens Online February 15 Early-Bird Registration Deadline for 2014 Annual Communication February Year Re-Dedication of Ben Hur Lodge No. 322 Kansas City February 28 Submission Deadline for Lodges Interested in Cancer Screening Clinics March 15 Last Day for Regular Registration for 2014 Annual Communication March 18 Kansas Masonic Foundation Board of Trustees Meeting Topeka March 19 Kansas Masonic Lodge Luncheon & Seminar Topeka March 19 Annual Communication Welcome Reception Topeka March 20 & 21 Grand Lodge Annual Communication Topeka March 20 All-Masonic Banquet, Auction & Entertainment Topeka May 31 Kansas Masonic Foundation Scholarship Submission Deadline July Kansas Masonic All-State Marching Band Camp Hays July 25 East-West Shrine Bowl Hays For more detailed and up-to-date information, please check the Grand Lodge website calendar at KansasMason.org The Kansas Mason is now on Flickr. Upload and share your Kansas Mason photos at Get on the 2015 Grand Lodge calendar NOW! PLANNING FOR 2015 AND 2016 IS CURRENTLY UNDERWAY. To publicize your Lodge event statewide or have the Grand Master or other Grand Lodge Officers attend your event by including it on the Kansas Mason calender. PLAN NOW! 48 THE KANSAS MASON

49 ASKED AND ANSWERED By Nolan Sump, Salina Lodge No. 60, Cawker City Lodge No. 125 & Oketo Lodge No. 25 QUESTION: In the Third Degre lecture, there is mention of the 47th problem of Euclid. This is important in Freemasonry for teaching that Masons should be of good moral repute and to stand upright in the world. What is the origin of Euclid and his triangle, and how did this come to appear in a Third Degre lecture? Brad Eichelberger, Oketo Lodge No. 25 Answer: To answer this we must consider who Euclid was and his relation with the Pythagoreans. Euclid was a Greek mathematician who in 300 BC wrote a series of books on number theory called Elements, considered to be the first geometry textbook. In it he took ideas from the Pythagoreans from 200 years before and filled it with definitions, theorems, propositions and their proofs. One such theorem was one historian s attribute to Pythagoras the Pythagorean Theorem, which states the third side of a triangle, considered the hypotenuse, is equal to the sum of the square of the other two sides. An important theorem indeed, for it established the foundation of constructing any building. With this theorem, all buildings could be built plumb and level. In roof construction, this theorem proved to be invaluable. To look at two sides of a roof of a temple from the front of it, one can see the two hypotenuses. So influential was Euclid s Elements that it was set in type in Venice in 1482 and soon became the second most published book in the Renaissance. One can infer its importance in establishing a firm base in the formation of both Operative and Speculative Masonic lodges, until finally, the United Grand Lodge of England was formed in With the creation of lectures and ciphers Euclid for Masonic initiatory work, Euclid s Elements found a voice in a rising fraternity. But if the idea of the 47th Problem of Euclid was so fascinating, why didn t our Masonic forefathers choose any of the 46 that preceded it? The answer lies in the text of the books Euclid wrote. Elements actually consisted of about 12 volumes; Book 1 ended with the Pythagorean Theorem, which was a culmination of all the parts that led up to this theorem. Taking a Masonic perspective, a parallel can be seen then with the two degrees leading up to the final initiatory experience in the Master Mason degree. At the end of the initiate s journey, he learns about the 47th problem of Euclid, which itself was at the end of Book 1. Consider also 17th century philosopher Benedict Spinoza, who took Euclid s works and attached his moral philosophy to Euclid s 47th Problem by stating, The human mind has an adequate knowledge of the eternal and infinite essence of God. Being guided by reason and opening one s mind to the James Anderson infinite in nature and beyond, we can come closer to perfection in our hearts and minds, just like the perfection of the angles of the lines in Euclid s problem. QUESTION: I ve read Anderson s Constitutions and while I find it a good introduction to earlyday Freemasonry, could you tell me more about this man who wrote the document? A Brother from the northeast corner Answer: To answer your question, I conducted some research and found an article called James Anderson: Man and Mason, written by David Stevenson, in Heredom, a publication of the Scottish Rite Research Society. Published in 2002, much of the information provided comes from his work. As you know, James continued on page 50 About Nolan Sump: Nolan Sump is a gifted facilitator for Hiawatha USD 415 and lives in Blue Rapids with his wife Monica. Ten years ago, Nolan was raised as a Master Mason in Salina Lodge No. 60. Since then, he has served as Worshipful Master of Cawker City No. 125 and is now the Master of Oketo No. 25. He is the current District Deputy Grand Master of District No. 21. In addition, Nolan serves on the Grand Lodge Public Schools Committee. You can contact Nolan with your questions at WINTER

50 STATE MASONIC PUBLIC SCHOOL ESSAY CONTEST ASKED AND ANSWERED continued from page 49 Anderson was the author of Constitutions, it being published in He was born in 1680 and raised in Aberdeen, Scotland. His father, a glazier, was presumed to be a Freemason as well. Anderson had an interest in becoming a minister and at the time, faced scrutiny being a Presbyterian in a time divided by two churches; that of Presbyterianism in Scotland and Episcopalian in England. He was seen as a non-conformist as he studied for the ministry. Upon ordination as a minister in the Church of Scotland in 1707, he moved to London and served as a Presbyterian minister in one of its many neighborhoods. Anderson proved his effectiveness at the pulpit and published several sermons, which was not often done in these days. By 1715, it is suggested, he had become a Freemason. While he preached, he developed a taste for genealogical research, later publishing works on some of the lineage of certain noblemen in the London area. During this time, four lodges had merged together in 1717 to form the United Grand Lodge of England. Whereas in the recent past, lodges had merely been social clubs for the sake of enjoyment of others company, the new Grand Lodge wanted to go in a different direction. By 1721, Anderson became the focus of Past Grand Master John Desaugliers and then current Grand Master Duke of Montagu, who were looking for an author to create a constitution which would place a definite imprint on the legitimacy of their fraternity. Upon their request, Anderson agreed and began to write his book The Constitutions of Freemasonry. He finished it, presented it to Grand Lodge, and in 1723, Anderson s Constitutions became the foremost authority on Freemasonry. It offered a historical narrative, a code of conduct, and rules and regulations necessary for lodges to function. While the historical sketch of the origins of Freemasonry in was much more legend than fact, it was that linear history Anderson utilized which gave him credence to accomplish other more historically accurate works later in his life. So popular was his book it was published in Philadelphia in 1734 by Benjamin Franklin, being one of the first Masonic books published in the United States. He continued to preach and write to the end of his life, dying in 1738 a penniless man, but having left a lasting name in the lives of Freemasons across the world STATE MASONIC PUBLIC SCHOOL ESSAY CONTEST ESSAY CONTEST FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS WINNER $12,000 IN SCHOLARSHIPS ESSAY CONTESTTOPIC At least thirteen signers of the US Constitution were Freemasons. Discuss how Masonic values shaped the formation of our nation s republic. The winning essay(s) from a Local Lodge (one per high school in the Lodge s area) will be sent to the Grand Lodge and must be postmarked no later than December 1, THE KANSAS MASON

51 SIDE OPTIONS The Osborne Artificer Collection Exclusively for Macoy These beautiful rings are not sold anywhere else! 10K & 14K Gold Masonic Rings. Hand-Crafted in America, by Brother Osborne DESIGN YOUR OWN RING SIDE OPTIONS K or 14K gold Forget Me Not Masonic Ring with synthetic stone K or 14K Masonic Artificer Open Band ring. Blue Enamel K or 14K Masonic Working Tools Ring with synthetic stone K or 14K Past Master Ring Antiqued finish with Blue Enamel. CUSTOM LODGE RINGS Sterling Silver Past Master Ring. Antiqued finish with Blue Enamel. STERLING SILVER 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed Custom Lodge Ring. 10K with synthetic Black stone. Antiqued finish with Blue Enamel. Specify Your Lodge Name and Number. GO TO FOR CURRENT RING PRICES OR CALL US AT K or 14K Masonic More Light Ring with Working Tools and synthetic stone K or 14K Masonic Plum & Trowel Ring with synthetic stone. $25 STOCK FEE FOR RETURN RINGS..c WINTER

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