THE GREEK AUSTRALIAN VEMA. Our Primate s View

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1 THE GREEK AUSTRALIAN VEMA OCTOBER 2006 Tel. (02) Fax: (02) The oldest circulating Greek newspaper outside Greece In this issue... INTERVIEW TO ATHENS VEMA ARCHBISHOP STYLIANOS OF AUSTRALIA Mitsotakis and Simitis - Victims of Chrysopigi PAGE 19/37 Thirty years on, Onassis still fascinates Greeks PAGE 6/24 Doing the Right Thing by Adam and Eve PAGE 8/26 Our Primate s View FROM NARCISSISM TO DEMON-AFFLICTION - B - GOVERNOR OF W.A. VISITS ST ANDREW S uro Funeral Service Eëëçíéêü Ïéêïãåíåéáêü Ãñáöåßï Ôåëåôþí PAGE 5/23 THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE On October 9, 2006, the Governor of Western Australia, His Excellency Ken Michael, visited St Andrew s Greek Orthodox Theological College, Sydney. After meeting the Dean of the College, His Eminence Archbishop Stylianos, in the central offices of the Archdiocese, Governor Ken Michael addressed several members of the staff and students in the College s Main Hall, accompanied by his wife Julie. During his modest address, the Governor focused not on his personal achievements (which are many, having served as the Chancellor of the University of Western Australia, among many other key positions), but rather on his deep pride in his Greek heritage and his love for Australia. The Governor stated that the historical significance of his own centuries-old Christian name of Komninos (from where Ken derives), shared by his grandson, is a topic of personal study to this day. Having lost his father at a very young age and coming from a poor background, the distinguished guest reminded students that there are many opportunities available to them in a country such as Australia. He also paid homage to Archbishop Stylianos breadth of knowledge and leadership, and invited him to Government House on his next trip to Perth. The Governor and Mrs Michael kindly took the time to meet each student individually, before being shown the College Chapel, lecture rooms and Cathedral. 2nd International Symposium of Kytheraismos: The new spirit of the Kytherian Diaspora PAGES 14/32-15/33 Tel: (02) Available 24 hrs

2 The Greek Australian VEMA OCTOBER /20 TO BHMA 22 OCTOBER 1962: CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS In a televised speech of extraordinary gravity, President John F. Kennedy announces that U.S. spy planes have discovered Soviet missile bases in Cuba. These missile sites - under construction but nearing completion - housed mediumrange missiles capable of striking a number of major cities in the United States, including Washington, D.C. Kennedy announced that he was ordering a naval "quarantine" of Cuba to prevent Soviet ships from transporting any more offensive weapons to the island and explained that the United States would not tolerate the existence of the missile sites currently in place. The president made it clear that America would not stop short of military action to end what he called a "clandestine, reckless, and provocative threat to world peace." 28 OCTOBER 1886: STATUE OF LIBERTY DEDICATED The Statue of Liberty, a gift of friendship from the people of France to the people of the United States, is dedicated in New York Harbor by President Grover Cleveland. Originally known as "Liberty Enlighte-ning the World," the statue was proposed by the French historian Edouard de Laboulaye to commemorate the Franco-American alliance during the American Revolution. Designed by French sculptor FrÉdÉric-Auguste Bartholdi, the 151-foot statue was the form of a woman with an uplifted arm holding a torch. Its framework of gigantic steel supports was designed by EugÉne-Emmanuel Violletle-Duc and Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel, the latter famous for his design of the Eiffel Tower in Paris. 29 OCTOBER 1929: STOCK MARKET CRASHES Black TuesdayBlack Tuesday hits Wall Street as investors trade 16,410,030 shares on the New York Stock Exchange in a single day. Billions of dollars were lost, wiping out thousands of investors, and stock tickers ran hours behind because the machinery could not handle the tremendous volume of trading. In the aftermath of Black Tuesday, America and the rest of the industrialized world spiraled downward into the Great Depression. Letters to the Editor Dear Editor I would like to make comment about the article written in the last edition (September) of your paper, regarding the Organ harvesting from prisoners in China. I felt very proud when I read the article, to see that the Australian Greek community is not afraid to speak out about the terrible things happening with Human Rights in China. It was only last month that two international figures came to Australia to tell of there independent study of Organ Harvesting in China of Falun Gong practitioners. On July 6 former Canadian Secretary of State (Asia Pacific) David Kilgour and international human rights lawyer David Matas released a report confirming allegations of organ harvesting in China. David Kilgour was accompanied in Australia by, Edward McMillan Scott, the Vice President of the European Parliament. A copy can be viewed at this address, For those who don t know Falun Dafa, also known as Falun Gong, it is a meditation system that has the principle of Truth- Compassion-Tolerance as its base and consists of 5 gentle Qigong (callisthenic type) exercises. It is free of charge and an estimated 100 million people practice it in around 78 countries. Its benefits are astounding. Those who practice find themselves free of stress, having clarity of mind and a continuing holistic improvement of mind, body and spirit. It is something free for all ages and all ethnicities in our community. It was introduced to the world through China in 1992 by Mr Li Hongzhi. It was practiced without any problems and a large number of the Chinese Communist Party membership was even practicing it. Yet, in July of 1999 Jiang Zemin, China s authoritarian President at the time, through fear and jealousy of its popularity, launched an eradication campaign against Falun Gong. He began a worldwide propaganda campaign against it. All of the things he said about Falun Gong have been proven to be false. The so-called Tiananmen Square self immolation has been proven to be false by the United Nations. All governments around the world know the truth about Falun Gong. There is documented evidence of 2,945 people having been murdered; however the real figure is estimated to be in the tens of thousands. Many thousands of people have been and continue to be, tortured, murdered and raped. Aside from death through torture while held in the vast labour camps system in China, there are now also tens of thousands of suspected deaths taking place through organ harvesting. These people are dying directly through the process of having their organs forcefully removed while still alive and their remains cremated to hide the evidence. Such crimes are too horrible for anyone to even think about or try and believe, yet they are happening and the evidence exists to prove it. What is happening in China at this moment is genocide. Genocide is something that we, as Greek people, have experienced first hand with the plight of Greek Pontians. As people with conscience who have witnessed and experienced the crime of genocide, we must continue to stand up to correct the wrongs in the world. The Human Rights violations happening in China are truly against what it is to be human. Because of trade, tourism and economic ties with China, our Government is not doing nearly enough to use the power of such things to voice strong disapproval to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) that rules China. If our Government allows their moral judgement to be manipulated by money to the extent of turning a blind eye to large scale genocide by the regime that is our second largest trading partner, this will be the beginning of the end to all that we hold precious as Australians and Greeks. So I feel that it will be through good people like those reading this, which will help make our Government listen in order to put pressure on the CCP to end this genocide. I wish and hope to see more things happen from within our Greek community including the Greek Orthodox Church to help end this genocide. It is a crime against humanity and I think it should not be accepted by any human being. Every letter and phone call to our members of parliament and the media will help raise awareness of this atrocity and help to stop it. Kind regards, Bill Thodori To the Editor To Vema I was very pleased to see that this newspaper has published and hence helped to expose this horrific crime of forced organ harvesting taking place in China. I have now read and seen numerous video reports about this genocide taking place against people who practice Falun Gong. The BBC news service also published a report recently on September 27 called Organ sales thriving in China: which confirms that forced organ harvesting in China is not a new phenomenon. This persecution of Falun Gong is targeted against innocent people who live their lives like any normal person in society. Aside from living normal lives, practitioners of Falun Gong aim to exercise their bodies and improve their moral character. The systematic mass beating, torture, rape and killing of these people in China s labour camp system is abhorrent. Now, to top it all off, it s been exposed that these people are also being chopped up while still alive and their body parts sold for hundreds of thousands of dollars. The Canadian authors (David Matas, human rights attorney and David Kilgour, former MP) of the independent investigative report which confirms these crimes are taking place, are correct in saying that This is a new form of evil not yet seen on the planet. I hope that we as a Greek community continue to speak up even louder against this evil type of crime and in doing so encourage others to also speak up. By doing so, the ruling regime in China responsible for this crime will have to stop it. The more silent we are when witnessing such a crime, the more this equates to giving a green light for it to continue. Doing billions of dollars of trade and granting such a regime the privilege of holding the Olympic Games while simultaneously remaining silent on such a mass atrocity, will implicate all of us in this crime against humanity. Allowing this crime to continue is not a matter of economics or of what side of politics anyone aspires to; it is a matter of conscience for all humans. Chris Cominos - North Balwyn To the Editor, Thank you for the article you published in September in the Vema Newspaper - Chinese Policeman lifts lid on organ harvesting. I am really happy to see a Greek newspaper publish information on such disgusting human rights abuses and crimes against humanity that are happening in China towards Falun Gong and others. The article was sent to me by a friend in Australia and I just wanted to express my gratitude. Thank you once again. My name is Gabriel Georgiou and I am a Greek-Australian who has been practising Falun Gong for the last four and half years. I have been living in Greece for the last two and half years. There are many Greeks who practise Falun Gong and it is a beautiful and peaceful practice that is continually gaining popularity in Greece due to it s amazing health benefits as well as it s peaceful teachings. It is very important for the world to know the truth about the persecution of thousands who just want to be healthier better people and to be able to contribute positively to society. Such evil behaviour should not be tolerated at all, and the evil nature of the Chinese Communist Party should be exposed. As the saying goes - It takes evil to thrive when good men and women sit back and do nothing. Thanks for reporting the truth, keep up the good work and looking forward to future articles. Well done! Sincerely yours,, Gabriel Georgiou To the Editor, Thank you for publishing the article in your September issue of Vema Newspaper about the horrific forced removal of Organs from prisoners of conscience, especially from Falun Gong. People need to know the truth behind the Communist party in China carrying out these atrocious acts of violence and deceit toward human beings. Please continue to write and expose this genocide that is taking place in China for those who are not free to speak so we can speak up and write to our governments to help stop this evil. Dear Editor, Sincerely yours,, Tina Sofos I am a regular reader of your newspaper. Congratulations on such a good job including the English section. Keep the good work up. You are a real credit to the Greek Community. Thank you for your efforts. I have a request from your September 2006 edition. My Son is working in London and I want to send him the article on Military Service (in English) on page 13/31. Could you please me the article in English so that I may forward it to my Son. The article will be of valuable assistance to my son and encourage him to obtain further information from the Embassy there. Thank you again, Dimitri Potiris (James Poteri)

3 OCTOBER 2006 The Greek Australian VEMA TO BHMA 3/21 Editorial Fascination over the Croc Hunter lives on By Jade Bilowol The loss of the Crocodile Hunter lingers. Internet sites featuring anything from stories and tributes to gossip and animations about the khaki-clad and slightly hyperactive Steve Irwin still receive a mind-boggling number of hits. And newspapers continue to churn out items linked to the daredevil naturalist, who was fatally speared in the chest by a stingray's barb off the far north Queensland coast early last month. A woman suffering the same freak fate 70 years ago, and the Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service decision to withdraw ads featuring him - in a sign of respect to his family - have hit the headlines in recent days. So, too, have the Brisbane Bullets announcing all proceeds from a match will be donated to his Wildlife Warriors conservation fund, as well as his American-born widow Terri pledging to return to the Crocoseum stage at the family's Australia Zoo wildlife park by Christmas to help out at live crocodile shows. Audiences still can be enthralled by the wildlife warrior's fearless antics as The Crocodile Hunter series - that made him a household name - continues to beam into living rooms over cable television. On free-to-air TV, a commercial featuring his bubbly eightyear-old daughter Bindi spruiking the zoo on Queensland's Sunshine Coast is on high repetition to capitalise on the school holiday break. But, sadly, she no longer chirps "there's a chance you'll see my Dad there too". Public fascination has bubbled along despite the inescapable media frenzy, featuring bizarre stories such as a fan feeding his baby's placenta to goannas to bring his son closer to the reptile world and Russell Crowe angrily denying he was set to play Steve Irwin in a movie portraying him. And who could forget the stingray slayings, suspected to be in retribution, and the feral spray from expat Germaine Greer about the animal world taking its revenge? If it had been practically anyone else's death, it would have been total overkill. But despite a memorial service - that an estimated 300 million people globally tuned into - to provide closure, some people just don't want to say goodbye, according to Karen Brooks, a visiting fellow at the University of Queensland centre for critical and cultural studies. Dr Brooks says it's "anecdotally 50-50" when it comes to those who are "over it" versus those who aren't. "But it's not that those who are over it haven't been touched by it. They have been saddened by it and they don't want to keep being reminded of the loss," Dr Brooks says. On the flipside there are numerous reasons for the continued shock, disbelief and grief, she says. Dr Brooks contends Mr Irwin's death didn't allow Australia to fully embrace him. "Nobody was ready to say goodbye. They were just getting to know him," Dr Brooks said. "Part of it is not a great reflection on us. In Australia, we were a little bit embarrassed by him and it wasn't fashionable to admit you liked Steve Irwin. "I think we all felt we had much more time to become accustomed to him and integrate him into the discourse of what makes us Australian. We were embarrassed by his overt passion and enthusiasm in a day and age where you don't wear your heart on your sleeve any more. "People are suspicious of those who tend to, and that's an indictment on us, and not Steve Irwin at all. "His death didn't allow us to embrace him in a way we all thought we had time to do, to tell him and his family how much we appreciated his values." Dr Brooks said people also felt guilt realising the extent of his conservation work and his humble personality - after his death. "This term `wildlife warrior' wasn't an empty phrase. It was real. It really described what he was and how he perceived himself. "And I think people are feeling a deep regret and they feel like they want to fill the void by knowing him after death. "He never changed, no matter what forum you saw him in, whether he was with (US President) George `Dubya' Bush... What you saw was what you got." Despite relentless media coverage of his personality and life, Dr Brooks said fascination lived on because he still had an element of mystery. "People are hungry for more," she says. "Despite being very in our faces a lot, he managed to retain a lot of mystery about how he got where he was and he was so humble about his fame." She says people are coping with the loss in all sorts of ways. "People thought it was their own personal tragedy, they felt like they had lost a brother," Dr Brooks says. "People have been, on YouTube (internet website), recreating his death and, on one level, it's really tasteless and people are probably doing it for financial gain or notoriety. "But on the other it is also people going to extraordinary measures to make sense of his senseless death." AAP Talking Point by Ann Coward Keeping up It s not even summer, and already Christmas decorations are in the stores. I ve come to the conclusion that if you don t want to pay too much for Christmas treats, it s better to either shop the moment items appears, or otherwise wait until January. The only problem I find with buying early is that all the treats get eaten well in advance and I then have to restock, which I guess means that I m probably the sort of shopper the store s like! I often wonder just how much thought goes into deciding when to offer goods for sale, and how stores display, advertise, and price seasonal items. A friend has just gone through the process of organising a wedding reception, and slowly over a period of several weeks the choice of menu has changed considerably. I wondered, as she told me the pricing system of the various meal choices and wine lists, if she had fallen prey to a very clever marketing strategy. When it comes to weddings, baptisms, funeral, and more and more also to birthdays, there is often a great desire to throw caution to the wind and for those footing the bill to splash out. Sometimes, the amount of money spent may be seen to directly reflect the amount of love or goodwill being expressed. Perhaps the cost of a celebration may be an indication of a person s standing in their community, or may be an attempt to compete with, or to better, another s event. Whatever the reasons, it seems clear that expectations are increasing, and the demands being placed on people hosting functions has become extreme. I m not advocating doing way with grand events. I cherish a childhood memory of a wedding where there was a full big band in attendance, complete with vocalist to provide the entertainment. Sometimes, though, it s more appropriate to scale down celebrations. Probably the happiest engagement party I ever attended was held in a remote community hall, where all the farm people for miles around brought sponge cakes, and platters of scones and sandwiches. The older women fussed over the urns and pots of tea, the children chased each other in and out of the hall, and the men stood outside around the keg. As for a memorable wedding, I often recall one where all the wedding party headed off to a nearby park after the service, spread out blankets on the grass, and tucked into a meal prepared by the groom. Much to everyone s delight, the newly married couple opened all their modest gifts at the same time. Large amounts of money on events spent can certainly make a difference to venue, décor, tablecloths, paper versus cloth napkins, and so on. It still remains, though, that the essential ingredients when hosting celebrations has not altered throughout the years, being family, friends, and a generosity of spirit. SAY YES ON THE NO DAY 28 October is a National Day for the Greeks who, around the world, celebrate the refusal of their nation to yield to fascism in That was the day, when they all said No to the request of the Axis powers to surrender after ten powerful European countries had done so without any real resistance. Since then, the date is remembered as the No (OXI, pronounced Ochi in Greek) Day. This year, for the 66 th Anniversary, the Greek Orthodox Community of Canberra has prepared a celebration of inclusion and diversity to commemorate the occasion which will use the Hellenic Club in Woden as its stage. As in previous years there will be music and festivities with a large dose of delicacies thrown in. But, more than what has taken place before, this year the Community is inviting all of Canberra to join in the celebrations. We say yes to diversity, yes to harmony and yes to celebrations. We have invited a band of musicians from Melbourne to play non-stop for that evening in October. Dancing groups and special events are being organised but details will be kept secret until the final weeks. Entry to this festive Dinner Dance will be by a ticket that will allow entry, access and partaking of a sumptuous meal. However, this year s great innovation is that the ticket, which will cost $50 for adults and $20 dollars for children, comes with goods of equal value attached. In other words, the ticket gains you access to the party and buys you the meal but will also give you vouchers of the value of $50 and $20 respectively, to be exchanged for goods at the best shops in Canberra. This approach will make your participation at the celebration free and will also put in order the grocery shopping for the week after. The only catch is that we must limit this offer to the first 600 people to reserve their ticket. 100 of those tickets are reserved for children leaving only 500 for adults. The Community is throwing this party for all of Canberra and we hope you will accept our invitation and book early to come and celebrate with us. If you miss out on the first 500 tickets, then of course you will be made equally welcome as more tickets will be available for purchase but they will not carry this very special bonus. In the meantime, make sure you are one of the first to call The Hellenic Club on to purchase tickets and say Yes for this year s celebrations of the Greek National Day. We hope to see you all at the Hellenic Club on 28 October. Program for Sunday 29 October 2006 A church service will be held on Sunday morning as usual at St Nicholas in Kingston, following the service a Doxology will be held from 11:15am. At noon there will be a wreath laying ceremony at the War Memorial. Emilios Konidaris President 3 October 2006

4 4/22 TO BHMA The Greek Australian VEMA OCTOBER 2006 Is the EYE only the window to our soul? By Kaliope Kariatlis - B.Opt (Hons) UNSW New hope for those with age related Macular Degeneration the growth of the leaky blood vessels at the macula, further loss of central vision can be slowed down, and in many cases reversed. The chemical agent that Lucentis blocks (VEGF-A) is an important agent which helps maintain the health of our heart. Therefore, although there has only been a low incidence reported, stroke has been listed as one of the possible side effects of the drug. Age related macular degeneration is the major cause of blindness and visual impairment in Australia. The severe visual repercussions of this disease are becoming more apparent as the percentage of elderly people with this disease is increasing within our community. The development of a new drug, Lucentis is now giving new hope to thousands of macular degeneration sufferers all over the world. What is macular degeneration? Macular degeneration affects a specific part of the retina - the inner most layer of the eyeball - called the macula. The macula is that part of the retina that gives us our central detailed vision. If, for example, our central vision were to become affected as a result of macular degeneration in both eyes, then if we were to look directly at a person s face we would not see that person s eyes, mouth and nose clearly. A person without and with macular degeneration Although many theories exist when it comes to what factors lead to macular degeneration, it is believed that the end result of insufficient blood flow and the deposition of abnormal materials in the layers of the retina at the macula are what cause one s central vision to be affected. In the early stages, macular degeneration may be referred to as being at the dry stage. This means that although there is evidence of materials being deposited at the macula they are not at the stage where they are affecting vision by any great degree. If the macula degeneration turns wet it indicates that new leaky blood vessels may be developing at the macula. It is these leaky blood vessels that destroy one s central vision. There are a number of risk factors that can increase one s chances of developing macular degeneration. Increasing age, a family history, and smoking are some of the key risk factors. What are the latest treatments to deal with macula degeneration Up until now there have been no treatments available to help improve the vision in those with wet macular degeneration. Various treatments were developed to try and slow down the progression of the disease but no treatment provided any significant improvement in vision. Recently a new drug to treat and reverse the effects of wet macular degeneration has been unveiled. In a recent publication of INSIGHT, an ophthalmic monthly newspaper, it was stated that recent studies revealed that, vision was maintained or improved in 96% of patients with wet macular degeneration when treated with an injection of Lucentis. Lucentis works by blocking the chemical agent within the eye (VEGF-A) which causes the new leaky blood vessels to grow at the macula in wet macula degeneration. By stopping A person without and with macular degeneration Lucentis is injected directly into the eye on a monthly basis and can be reviewed at 3 months to monitor its effect. It comes at a cost of $2000 per injection. Suitability for this treatment can only be determined by an eye specialist, preferably one who specialises in macular degeneration. Your optometrist should be able to refer you to such an eye specialist. Given that wet macula degeneration is set to affect over 25 million people, world-wide drugs, such as Lucentis, are definitely a step in the right direction in helping preserve sight. REGULAR EYE TESTS WITH YOUR OPTOMETRIST OR OPHTHALMOLOGIST ARE IMPORTANT IN DETECTION OF THE DISEASE. * The information given in this article is of a general nature and readers should seek advice from their own Optometrist before embarking on any treatment. By Mina Candalepas* Psychologist MAPS Reg NSW PS Understanding and managing disabilities in families The term disability is generally a term used to describe a range of impairments or deficits in day to day functioning, including intellectual and/or learning, psychiatric, sensory and/or speech, physical or a disability resulting from an acquired brain injury. The impact on the family Regardless of the type of disability, the discovery and/or medical diagnosis that a child has a disability, whether at birth, or as a result of an illness and/or accident, is a frightening experience for any family and particularly for parents. Parents are faced with managing a multitude of emotions, for example their expectations of the child that they had hoped for, the expectations of their wishes for their child s future and their expectations for the future of their family unit. In addition to such emotions, is managing the day to day stressors of the effect that the child s disability has on the family unit, the added stressors with respect to understanding and accepting the disability and the financial impacts. Furthermore, in some communities, including the Greek Australian Community, the diagnosis of a disability may lead to isolation, which may be related to a fear of rejection within the community and the false perception that the disability is related to false parenting. Parents may blame themselves for the disturbance, compounding stigma and limiting the engagement of mental health Mental Health services. A child s disability may therefore be hidden, creating difficulty in managing the day to day demands, as well as managing the anxiety associated with keeping it a secret. It is therefore no surprise, that a parent s emotional response may be sadness, withdrawal from social activity, anxiety relating to their child s future, shame pertaining to the disability amongst many other experiences. Given the day to day stressors in managing a disability and the additional stress it places on the family unit, the divorce rate for parents with children that have a disability is significantly higher than those that do not. Siblings of children with disabilities may be impacted, in that their parents may not have as much time to attend to their needs. They may also be required to assist parents with care giving and day to day household tasks, this having an adverse impact on the emotional wellbeing, of these children. Grandparents of a child with a disability may also be affected, in that not only are they required to come to terms with their grandchild s disability, but the impact that this has on their adult children. How to manage Once a child is diagnosed with a disability, it is essential that parents have a comprehensive understanding of the disability and its management. Coming to terms with and acceptance of the disability is also one of the key factors that will facilitate effective management. Accessing relevant support services could help to facilitate this process. Self preservation and self care are essential. For example taking breaks in caring for the child and accepting offers of help. It is also important to support the child to become as independent as is possible and provide the child with education about safety. Respite centres, also provide a parent with relief, an example of a respite centre is the ESTIA Foundation, in Sydney, founded by the Greek Orthodox Archdioses of Australia, which provides 24 hour respite care for young adults with intellectual and physical disabilities. Such foundations not only provide support for families, but a forum for our cultural awakening, that issues relating to disabilities form part of the normal human condition. Finally, it is important to understand disability in the context of ability and to recognise the positive qualities and the amazing rewards that come from having close relationships with a child that has a disability. It is crucial that member s of families with children with disabilities that are not coping engage in support services as soon as possible. For more information call your local GP. Your local Psychologist or the Australian Psychological Society (APS) Referral Service on , may also be able to provide you with more information. For more information on ESTIA, please contact the offices of the ESTIA Foundation on (02) Mina Candalepas is a Registered Psychologist. She is the sole director of a Clinical Private Practice in the Campsie Professional Medical Practice, Sydney NSW. Her particular speciality is in trauma and chronic pain management and she also provides psychological therapy for depression, anxiety, work-place issues and/or injuries, relationship issues, self esteem and grief. Therapy is conducted in either English or Greek. All services are by appointment ONLY and strictly confidential. Her contact details are Tel (02) , Mob

5 OCTOBER 2006 The Greek Australian VEMA TO BHMA 5/23 Our Primate s View By Archbishop Stylianos of Australia In continuing our painful article to prove the systematic undermining of the Ecumenical Patriarchate which was undertaken and undauntedly continued by Archbishop Christodoulos of Athens (!), we shall attempt here to put in some order the incongruous declarations he has made until now, especially since his elevation to the throne of Athens. This responsible recording and mapping is of course not an easy matter, for many reasons. Above all because the phenomena are sometimes not only deceptive, but also capable of leading one to the point of schizophrenia. And yet, the late N.G. Pentzikis has taught us, in a far more compunctious manner, the architecture of the fragmented life. However, for purely methodological reasons, we shall view the topic at hand under the following three comprehensive and characteristic headings: * Disputation and insatiable expectations of a conqueror * Negotiations concerning a non-existent jurisdiction beyond Greece * Bureaucratization of services, and complete secularization of Church administration Unless one carefully sees the complex gamut of each of the above areas, as well as the latent interdependence of all three, it is impossible to comprehend the truly demonic plan which has been concocted for the first time, amidst praise and applause of the more popular levels of Greek society, which was until now very reverent, modest and wise. With this proposed method of studying the phenomenon of Christodoulos and Chrysopigi Monastery, it will not be difficult to see that each of the three headings above in fact summarizes, somewhat like a definition of a thematic unit, a host of initially tentative actions which, as it turned out, are outrightly confrontational. Indeed, they can come from various angles simultaneously, such that the supposed opponent enters if possible - a state of perplexity, if not panic! We should not overlook this sacrilegiously insensitive tactic and strategy of the mentioned undermining actions, precisely because they were boldly and cowardly attempted during an historic period when the wordly supplies (people and resources) are very restricted in the See of the Ecumenical Patriarchate due to political circumstances, while Athens more than ever before offers every facility, to the point of opulence. How could even the most objective observer not feel indignation especially an Orthodox Hierarch or even the average faithful at such an unequal contest and dishonorable guerilla warfare? Is the moral authority of the most sacred name of the Ecumenical Patriarchate alone a sufficient counterbalance? And to think of the tragic irony that all of these things should have been considered as what was in hindsight owed to the suffering Mother Church of Constantinople by the former daughter Church, which was elevated to a sister Church through blackmail. It must be admitted that such ungrateful pathos was absent even from the antipatriarchal phase of the turbulent service of the much-criticized late Archbishop Ieronymos of Athens, who was promoted by the Junta. Understandably, he could have felt (and would have felt, humanly-speaking) humbled in his old age with the rank of Archimandrite, given that he was continually circumvented by the Bishops of both Athens and Constantinople (without this of course justifying the snatching of the Archiepiscopal throne by force!). Let us now turn to our topic, paragraph by paragraph, according to the areas already mentioned. a) Disputation and insatiable expectations of a conqueror Even from the first moment that the then Metropolitan Christodoulos of Dimitriada became Archbishop of Athens with the well-known events surrounding that election the triumphant tones of the statements, events and surprises of the Monastic Brotherhood (Chrysopigi) which had supposedly taken power, left no doubt as to what was to follow. First of all there was the awkward-sounding renaming of the Installation speech of the Archbishop from an Enthronistirion to an Epivatirion (!), which has the innuendo of surmounting. This should not be taken as a naïve expression of a supposed desire to return to an earlier period of the Church s vocabulary. It was instead an obviously pompous testimony to the thirst of the newly-installed and heavy-handed Head to dominate everything! This initial suspicion on the part of the writer, which was undoubtedly shared by many others who knew the character and history of the new Archbishop, has been verified to the utmost up until the present time. Indeed. Never before had the election of a new Archbishop of Athens seen the inept and hasty promulgation with a corresponding confrontational spirit and audacity of what was clearly a longstanding program of a few hard core Bishops (of Chrysopigi) to directly and quickly get even with the Phanar in Constantinople. Explicit and audacious, both in their language used and actions taken, Metropolitans Kallinikos of Pireaus and Ambrosios of Aigialeia (above all), stated unreservedly that the election of Christodoulos was absolutely tied to the clear mandate of the hierarchy (!) to demand from the Ecumenical Patriarchate the single and undivided jurisdiction over the entire Greek territory. Having commenced with such bravado which all Greek people heard repeated up until the first official visit of the new Archbishop to the Patriarchate the delegation then heard there the austere reminder of the terms which they themselves owed, but never kept, and were therefore forced to come down to earth somewhat, in order to salvage at least the appearance of basic social decorum. They gave the pretence of course of wanting to discuss peacefully some solution to outstanding matters, yet subsequent actions showed that also the new agenda of Athens displayed only a steady disputation of the Phanar s claims, and a rapacity characteristic of invaders! So while on the one hand the impression was given that all obligations stemming from the Tome of Autocephaly (1850) and the Patriarchal Act (1928) would be accepted, nasty sentiments publicly emerged between supposedly consanguineous Brothers in Christ. Furthermore, certain things were dared which had never been dared before against the Mother Church of Constantinople, not even by the Orthodox of other backgrounds. For example, how could that provocative and irreverent comment be accepted, with which Archbishop Christodoulos sent to the Phanar the List of Candidate Bishops (in accordance with just one of the conditions of the 1928 Act!): Purely for your information! It was as if he was doing a favour for journalists who asked a question in passing. Then followed the indescribable election (via transfer) of Metropolitan Anthimos of Alexandroupoli as Metropolitan of Thessaloniki, as well as the movement of other new Metropolitans to other Eparchies of the region concerned, which literally exhausted the patience of the Bishops of the Patriarchate. However, those who cunningly conducted the affairs of Chrysopigi knew how to strategically choose even the weaknesses and friction between people, so as to advance their own plans in stages. Similarly, the tactical shift and apparent back down of Archbishop Christodoulos certainly gave the host of scandalized simple faithful some relief while also reviving, even if temporarily, the terribly tried authority and status of the Mother Church but those who know persons and situations from within, were certain that the relentless contention would, instead of being resolved for the benefit of both sides, reappear more severely at a later date. FROM NARCISSISM TO DEMON-AFFLICTION -B - When in due course the list of the Clergy and lay advisers or Canon Law specialists who assumed the role of guiding both Heads of Church at critical moments is established and substantiated, another curious factor in the tragicomedy of this whole conflict that will be shown, is that both protagonists used in succession the same individuals of the Marketplace! And of course it would not be an exaggeration to state that this unacceptable sporting match was not only the shame of the Heads and those immediately involved, but also of those irresponsible spectators from any responsible Church or State position! It must be said that Archbishop Christodoulos and his supporters would not have dared to even imagine the unrealistic and sacrilegious things they did, especially in the first stage of the conflict, had they not been misled by two totally erroneous evaluations: Firstly, to undervalue the power of the Hierarchs of the Ecumenical Patriarchate abroad (W. Europe, America, Oceania etc.) as non-existent or at least vulnerable, when they are striving honorably for their large flocks amidst alien environments. Secondly, to consider that the anguished Ecumenical Patriarch, together with the Bishops who remain in Turkey, are still functioning under the unbearable conditions of the implacable political circumstances which existed only until recently. They should however have realized that, just as international organizations for the protection of human rights took shape in at least the last two decades of the 20 th century, the Ecumenical Patriarchate could outspokenly claim with moral strength its proper place based on history. At any rate, Archbishop Christodoulos and his officials underestimation of Greeks abroad, expressed on various occasions, whether officially or in private, is naïve, if not malevolent. They claim that Greeks abroad have a use by date due to the increasing number of mixed marriages! The author s response to this in a relevant published article at the time, that mixed marriages should be anxiously noticed by Archbishop Christodoulos in suburbs like Kolonaki and other highlighted regions of modern Greece, rather than by spiritual leaders abroad, seems to have made them, if not more cautious and just, at least more realistic, so as to begin to appreciate that in an increasingly globalised world, it is not only the institution of marriage which is in danger (when there is no fear of God and corresponding sensitivity towards one s fellow human being), but also all centuries-old sanctified institutions, including the sacred institution of the Synod! Still, the childish self-admiration of Archbishop Christodoulos reached a peak when he publicly stated to Patriarch Bartholomew personally, in a moment of uncontrollable irritation: Your All Holiness, don t be jealous (!). It was only natural for the Patriarch to give him the come-back: It would be strange for the first in seniority to be jealous of the 14 th (!). In closing somewhere between these tragic and humorous occurrences, we shall look forward to proceeding into the deep water in the forthcoming and final part of this trilogy. (to be continued in the next issue)

6 The Greek Australian VEMA OCTOBER /24 TO BHMA Victorian Multicultural Commission Award for Service Delivery to a Multicultural Community Rev. Fr. Stavros Kakavas of St Andrews Greek Orthodox Church, Parish of Nunawading and Forest Hill (Victoria) was recently awarded the Victorian Multi-cultural Commission Award for Community Services with the Greek community in Forest Hill. Rev. Fr. Stavros Kakavas works tirelessly with the Greek Community in Forest Hill for the maintenance and the preservation of the Greek Culture. This is evidenced through his connection and close work with the young people in Forest Hill. He is actively involved with the Youth Group and has largely been responsible for attracting many youth back to the Church. By explaining the Orthodox Faith and Greek Culture he has made efforts in separating the truth from the myths, clarifying, what is Greek culture and what is our Greek Orthodox spirituality/beliefs. This success is evident by the increased number of youth attending church services and regular Youth Group meetings. Fr. Stavros is an integral and important person in our community; he always has time for his parishioners, the school community, the elderly and the youth: - always prompting our Orthodox Faith and Greek Culture. On behalf of all Parish Church Committee, Philoptoho, Youth Group and the School Committee and the parishioners of the Forest Hill, we congratulate Fr Stavros on this award and we thank him for his tireless efforts, energy and drive. May God bless him and grant him strength. Stelios Konstantinidis On behalf of Church Committee, Philoptoho, Greek School Committee, Elderly Citizens Group and the Youth Group. Cypriot mouse could be first new European terrestrial mammal By Thomas Wagner Using DNA testing, scientists have discovered what is believed to be the first new species of terrestrial mammal found in Europe in decades: a mouse living in a mountainous area of Cyprus that has a bigger head, ears, eyes and teeth than other mice on the continent. The living fossil mouse mainly lives on the island's western Troodos Mountain, between 300 and 900 metres above sea level, Cucchi said. Its habitat consists of abandoned cultivation terraces with vineyards, grassy fields and bushes. "New mammal species are mainly discovered in hot spots of biodiversity, like Southeast Asia, and it was generally believed that every species of mammal in Europe had been identified," said Thomas Cucchi, a research fellow at Durham University, northeast England. "This is why the discovery of a new species of mouse on Cyprus was so unexpected and exciting," he said in an interview today. Genetic tests confirmed that the new mouse was a new species, and it was named Mus cypriacus, or the Cypriot mouse. The findings appeared in the peer-reviewed journal Zootaxa, an international journal for animal taxonomists. The biodiversity of Europe has been combed through so extensively since Victorian times that new mammal species are rarely found there, and few scientists had expected new creatures as large as mice to be discovered on the continent. Cucchi said a bat discovered in Hungary and Greece in 2001 was the last new living mammal found in Europe. No new terrestrial mammal has been found in Europe for decades, he said. By contrast, recent discoveries reported in developing countries have included a new tree rat in Brazil, a new primate in Tanzania and another new mouse in the Philippines. In Cyprus, Cucchi and other scientists he was working with compared the new mouse's teeth to those from mouse fossils collected by paleontologists. The comparison showed the new mouse had colonised and adapted to the Cypriot environment several thousand years before the arrival of man, Durham University said in a statement. The discovery indicated that the mouse survived man's arrival on the island, and now lived alongside common European house mice, whose ancestors had arrived with man during the Neolithic period, the university said. The new mouse of Cyprus is the only endemic rodent still alive, and as such can be considered as a living fossil," said Cucchi, a Frenchman. AP

7 OCTOBER 2006 The Greek Australian VEMA TO BHMA 7/25 Facts & Stats Dementia Awareness Month October 2006 Dementia Awareness Month is a major national program organised by Alzhemier s Australia. The theme of this year s Dementia Awareness Month is No Time to Lose. It is an opportunity for the government and communities to take action everywhere to improve the care and treatment of people with dementia, increasing funding for medical research and encourage healthy lifestyles and habits to help reduce the risk of dementia said National Executive Director of Alzheimer s Australia, Glenn Rees. The Greek Welfare Centre of NSW was recently funded for an education project, with the aim of raising awareness on the impact of Dementia among the Greek speaking community. Dementia has increasingly become evident in the Greek community. The impact of dementia has affected many Greek individuals and families, who have struggled to comprehend the nature of this condition. Dementia is a term used to describe the symptoms of a large group of illnesses, which cause a progressive decline in a persons cognitive functioning. There are different forms of dementia and each has its own causes. One of the most common forms of dementia is Alzheimer s disease and this year marks the centenary of its discovery. People with dementia may increasingly lose their thinking and memory skills, their intellect, rationality, social skills, may experience personality changes and find it difficult to manage activities of daily living. While dementia is more common as people age, it is not a normal part of ageing. Dementia is more common after the age of 65 years but can happen to anyone. The prevalence of dementia has grown in Australia. There are an estimated people in Australia with the condition. The latest research shows however that there have been major advances in understanding dementia. It is optimistic, that slowing the progression of dementia is possible, however it is not yet possible to say with certainty if dementia is preventable. Progression in research also shows that there are risk factors associated with dementia. Some risk factors that cannot be controlled include age and genes. Risk factors that can be controlled include having a healthy lifestyle and habits including maintaining physical and mental activity. The Greek Welfare Centre of NSW has dementia day care services in Eastern, South Western and Western Sydney. For further information, please contact the Dementia Education Project Officer, Katerina Tsamoglou on (02) Thirty years on, Onassis still fascinates Greeks in partnership with Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia GREEK WELFARE CENTRE would like to invite the Greek Community to attend come along and Find out more about what Council does Learn about the different sections of Council Develop partnerships with your local Council meet Councillors, Council staff and ask questions Share refreshments and have lunch Day: Thursday Date: 2 November 2006 Time: 10 am to 1 pm Place of Meeting: Hurstville City Library, Address: Corner of Dora Street and Queens Road, Hurstville An Interpreter and transport will be available. Pick-up will be from St George Migrant Resource Centre 552 Princes Highway, Rockdale places are limited. Bookings are essential. For bookings or more information, please call: Maria Kladis Greek Welfare Centre on OR Hurstville City Council, Community Services on By Karolos Grohmann His rags to riches story is the stuff of legend, while his personal life could well be the script of an ancient Greek tragedy. One of modern Greece's most famous sons, shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis built a vast empire over four decades with sheer determination, audacity and cunning entrepreneurial spirit. He died bitter and lonely in 1975, a shadow of the man who claimed to rule the world, two years after his only son, Alexander, was killed in a mysterious plane crash, an Athens exhibition on the centenary of his birth shows. A Greek refugee from the prosperous Ottoman city of Smyrna who made his first millions in Argentina in the 1920s, Onassis's near-mythical life is depicted in hundreds of personal items, private photographs and paintings exhibited at the Benaki Museum. His great wealth, his passionate affair with soprano Maria Callas, and his 1968 wedding to the widow of assassinated US president John F Kennedy, all point to the strong-minded, and sometimes even ruthless, character of the most celebrated of Greek shipping magnates. "He had an unparalleled determination. I would say he had an audacity no-one else had," said exhibition curator Sofia Handaka. "Onassis was a visionary who could see further into the future than any of his peers and that is reflected in his entrepreneurial success." The exhibition is staged by the Alexander Onassis Foundation, which the tycoon set up to keep his son's name alive after he died in "Onassis essentially died the day Alexander died," Handaka said. "Whatever he had built until then meant nothing to him after this event." That included a fleet of oil tankers, the Olympic Airways carrier, a long list of prime real estate from New York to Paris, a private Greek island and the most luxurious private yacht at the time named after his daughter Christina. It was on that yacht that he lavishly entertained the world's rich and famous in the 1950s and '60s. Rare pictures include British Prime Minister Winston Churchill casually chatting with Yugoslav leader Josip Broz Tito at the height of the Cold War on board the Christina. "He must have been a real charmer, a man with a very special aura and talents," said an elderly exhibition visitor, Dimitra Sotiriadou. "But while everything about him is mythical, you feel that real happiness always eluded him." Handaka said the exhibits, from an array of ship models built by 18th century French prisoners in England used to decorate the corridors of the Christina, to the extravagant menu of his first dinner with Callas, aimed at presenting his multi-faceted character. Several hunting guns and cigarette lighters in the shape of whaling canons speak of an aggressive, possessive man. The blood-stained handkerchief of his son the day he died tells more about what he lost in life than what he gained. His only other child, Christina, who saw her father, brother and mother die in a period of just 24 months, passed away in Argentina in 1988, survived by her daughter Athina. "He was a global ambassador for Greece and he carried his Greekness with him," Handaka said. "In a single word, the man was unique." REUTERS

8 8/26 TO BHMA The Greek Australian VEMA OCTOBER 2006 Windows to Orthodoxy Doing the Right Thing by Adam and Eve By Guy Freeland* In the last issue of Vema, I attempted to show that the Augustinian doctrine of original sin, the doctrine that we have all inherited the guilt and the punishment of the sin of Adam, collapses because certain premises essential to the argument are simply wrong. Most decisively, the doctrine rests on the following two false premises: First, the story of Adam and Eve in Genesis is basically historical record (it isn t). Second, the sin of Adam could be biologically transmitted down through the centuries (it couldn t). While hopefully we might have cleared away some dead wood, we are still left with the conundrums for which the doctrine seemingly provided at least partial answers. Why, in St Paul s words, is it that I not do the good I want, but the evil I do not want is what I do (Romans 7:19 RSV)? Is infant baptism essential to wash away innate sin? Why was the incarnation of Christ and His crucifixion necessary? These are major questions and I am not going to attempt comprehensive answers. Rather, I invite the reader to join with me in a little gentle rumination on the text of Genesis. First, however, we need to set down some rules of engagement. Laying Down Some Rules Most obviously, we must restrict ourselves to well-attested Orthodox principles of interpretation. One such principle is that we must commence with the literal meaning of the text. Here, the first task is to establish exactly what the literary genre of the text is. Is it historical record, prophecy, allegory, just what? Once we have given our best shot at tying down the literal meaning, we can proceed to search for deeper spiritual meaning lying beneath the surface of the text; the sensus plenior, the fuller meaning of Scripture. In determining the sensus plenior, we must interpret the text Christocentrically. Christ is the Logos, the eternal Word of the Father, and as such is the divine (as opposed to human) author of Scripture (see, e.g., John 5:39-40, 46). The Old Testament must be read through the lens of the New, especially the Gospels. As we proceed, we must bring our background scientific, archaeological, historical, philological etc knowledge along with us. It is a most extraordinary thing that many people, including a good few misguided Orthodox, think that it is virtuous to deposit their brains outside the church door before entering. The Fathers of the Church would have been overjoyed had they had access to our vastly superior background knowledge. We have been made in the image of God and, whatever else that means, it means that we are logical sheep - logical having the double meaning of the Logos, that is of Christ, the Good Shepherd, and rational. God has given us rational minds, if we refuse to use them they will atrophy and we will become dingbats, illogical sheep in both senses. While, on the one hand, we should bring our background knowledge along, on the other hand we should bring along the deep spiritual and theological insights of the Fathers, one of the great treasures of Orthodoxy. With something old and something new (not the same thing as putting new wine into old bottles!), let us see what we can do with Genesis 2:4 3:24. An Alternative Approach We know today that the Genesis narrative is not historical record but an allegory concerning the human condition and humanity s relation to God. Origen (c.185 c.254) did regard the narrative as an allegory, but the Fathers in general, while they typically observed that much of the language was anthropomorphic and allegorical, assumed that there was a core of historical fact. For this we cannot blame them, given the limitations of their background knowledge. In some cases, particularly in the case of Greek Fathers, this assumption had no serious consequences. In the case of Augustine ( ) it did; not only because of his reliance on it as a necessary premise in his argument for original sin but for another reason. Stressing that Adam and Eve were biologically the first pair of ancestors led to his treating the narrative as a description of the first moments in a continuing chain of causally linked events. It says a great deal for the perspicacity of certain Fathers that they did not read the narrative in this linear historical way. As early as the second century, Irenaeus, bishop of Lyons in France and probably a Greek from Smyrna (c.135-c.202), regarded Paradise as a future state of blessedness to which we are called. Moreover, that state had already been mystically realised in Christ, the New Adam, in whom the whole history of humanity was recapitulated. The purpose of the Paschal Mystery of Our Lord (and hence of baptism) was not, for Irenaeus, to redeem us from original sin (of which he knows nothing) but to make possible our theosis/deification: The Logos [the Word, i.e. Christ] was made human in order that we might be made God. These words were echoed by virtually every Greek Father of the Church. Irenaeus had laid the foundations for an alternative tradition to that later established by Augustine. Following our ground rules, let me try to sketch a non- Augustinian way of reading the narrative, bearing in mind that there can be no such thing as a definitive reading. As we believe that the Logos is the divine (as opposed to the human) author of Scripture, we can never claim that we have plumbed any passage of Scripture to its depths or seized the fulness of its meaning. Reading the Genesis Narrative With Irenaeus, Gregory of Nyssa (c ) and others, we should take ourselves as our point of reference. We live in a fallen world characterised by the struggle for survival, a world of sin and death, of violence and suffering, and of alienation from God, our fellow human beings and the non-human creation. And that is how it has always been. Augustine was at least right in maintaining that there is a deepseated rottenness in human beings, an innate disposition to choose evil over good. (Some Greek Fathers call this disposition original sin and trace its source to our solidarity with Adam. But a disposition to sin is not an actual sin.) But is human life today, as throughout history, what God intends it to be? Are human beings beyond perfectibility? The answer to both questions is No. The mythopoeic allegory of the Garden of Eden reveals both God s intention for humanity, and explains why that intention has been thwarted. The allegory tells us that God created humanity in His own image and likeness. But as the Fathers teach, while the image cannot be obliterated by sin, the likeness, the beauty of spiritual perfection, is something that is only achieved through baptism and the life in Christ. Moreover, its realisation involves ascetic struggle. According to the Genesis narrative, God s intention for humanity is plain. We should live in perpetual communion with Him, and we should desire freely to choose the good, as Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury (c ) put it, just because it is the good (a pretty good characterisation of what it means to enjoy perfect freedom through servitude to Christ). Paradise, depicted as a state of blessedness in which human beings dwell in harmony not only with God and their fellow human beings but with the whole creation, is achievable only through the Paschal Mystery of Christ. Paradise is to come, yet it is already realised in Christ in the Church. But this Paradiseto-come, but which now is, is not equatable with the primeval state of humanity. Rousseau s noble savage never existed. Before the creation of Eve, within the allegory, Adam exemplifies the fulness and integration of humanity per se - remember St Paul s, in Christ there is neither male nor female (Galations 3:28). For a fleeting moment, Adam is revealed as archetypal humanity as God intended us to be. But it is an indistinct foreshadowing of the incarnation, when Christ, the prototype of humanity in all its perfection, became flesh. Christ is the New Adam who will redeem the Old Adam of Genesis; that is, each and every one of us because Adam is not an historical person but every human being, Everyman. It is in this sense, not the Augustinian, that we should understand St Paul when he says as in Adam all die (1 Corinthians 15:22) and sin came into the world through one man (Romans 5:12). St Paul is writing within the allegory in order to make an important theological point, not making assertions about the historicity of the narrative. Even if he did take it to be basically historical record, that is irrelevant. Further, Paul is certainly not asserting that Adam s sin was inherited. This becomes clear from the full text of Romans 5:12: Therefore as sin came into the world through one man and death through sin, and so death spread to all men because all men sinned (RSV). We share in Adam s sin through our solidarity with him by virtue of the fact that we also have sinned. St Paul s interest is in contrasting one man, the prototype of perfect humanity, Christ, with another single individual, Adam, the prototype of fallen humanity. For Paul, Adam was a type of the one who was to come (Romans 5:14). So, the fleeting moment of wholeness passes, archetypal Adam/Everyman gives up a rib and Eve is created. Man and woman, beguiled by Satan, eat the fruit. But this is not so much a choice of whether to obey or disobey a moral injunction as an existential dividing of the ways. Adam and Eve have the choice of living in communion with God, freely choosing the good because it is the good, or to go the way of the ego, of making their own wilful choices, for good or for ill, irrespective of God s good. In Adam/Everyman we have, like lost sheep, taken the route that leads to sin and death - sin being that which severs communion with God, and hence leads to spiritual death. Rebirth in Christ But all is not lost, what we cannot do for ourselves, be born again, Christ can do for us. Baptism does not wash away original sin because original sin, as understood in the Augustinian tradition, does not exist. Rather, through baptism (and, of course, Augustine is not unaware of this) we appropriate to ourselves the Paschal Mystery of Our Lord. We sacramentally die with Him, are buried with Him, and are resurrected with, and clothed in, Him. The font is the mystic womb, and through emersion in its uterine waters we are made into new creatures and filled with the Holy Spirit. As a consequence of this rebirthing all actual personal sin is cleansed. But even adults emerge from the waters as spiritual infants (and are so depicted in early iconography). Baptism is the beginning of the life in Christ, but there is a long way still to travel. In the eucharistic life of the Church, the fruit of the Tree of Life, denied to Adam and Eve, becomes our food in Christ. As Gregory of Nazianzus (329/ ) says, Christ is brought up to the tree and nailed to it - yet by the Tree of Life He restores us. We will still stumble, time and again, but from now on we travel the Way which leads to Paradise by, with, through and in He who said: I am the Way, and the Truth, and the Life, no one can come to the Father but by me (John 14:6). * Guy Freeland teaches hermeneutics and liturgical studies at St Andrew s Greek Orthodox Theological College.

9 OCTOBER 2006 The Greek Australian VEMA TO BHMA 9/27 Two Sydney sisters at Athens University They thought that they were just enrolling in another Greek course here in Australia earlier this year. Little did Sophia and Patricia Cassimatis know this would lead to a road of surprises and self-discovery through a summer school at the University of Athens. They came back changed people, and this is their account. What does it mean to be a Greek Australian? Or further what does it mean to be a Kytherian-Australian? Prior to our studies at the University of Athens in January we had absolutely no idea of the answers to these self-defining questions. For us, being Greek-Australians meant a loving extended family, Church every Easter and Christmas, Kytherian social events and great food - lots of it. As young adults about to undertake Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Laws degrees at the University of Sydney, we did not totally grasp the complex nature of the intertwined relationship of two cultures, which was about to confront us. Despite our many attempts to learn the language in primary school, our efforts in an ever changing Australian environment proved unsuccessful, especially when our Great Aunt would complete all our homework! Having lived in Australia all our lives, where most of our extended family speak English, our ability to learn the language was hampered further. However, the plethora of culture and language subjects offered by the Arts Faculty at the University of Sydney presented the perfect opportunity to study the Greek language. Studying Greek encouraged us to further explore our Greek heritage. We gained insight, knowledge and perspective on multiple levels regarding our self-identity as 3 rd generation Greek-Australians. At the end of first year beginners Greek, we were offered the opportunity to continue our studies in Greek language through a six-week Summer School program coordinated by the University of Athens. Mentally ready to immerse ourselves in the Greek culture and Q take on this challenge, we jumped at this opportunity. Whilst we were slightly anxious about being in Greece for the first time, we were soon comforted by our fantastic and approachable teachers. We were advised that we would study the language solely in Greek for four weeks. We would then undertake a Greek history course for a week and following this, a class focussing on the development of the Greek language, concluding in an examination at the end of the six weeks. Studying for 4 hours a day, the classes were intensive and rewarding. Enthusiastic to show all of Athens our new skills that we had developed over several weeks, we were quite disheartened to find that, upon our first struggle in conversations, the well-meaning Athenians came to our rescue in English! On the contrary, our teachers did not come to our rescue with English in class. At the beginning of every class they would ask us to recount our experiences from the previous day, only with Trish and I to explain the same Questions & Answers What messages do the canons of the Church teach us that are important to our faith, yet not found in Scripture? A Basically, there are no fundamentally new messages in the canons of the Church as compared to the teaching of the Bible. The New Testament calls for a measure of order in Church life. St. Paul instructs us that all things should be done decently and in order (Greek euschemonos kai kata taxin ) (1 Corinthians 14:40). In Colossians 2:5 he rejoices at the orderly Church life in that place. On the other hand he is disturbed by beliefs, teachings, persons and practices which disrupt the orderly life of the Christian community (Galatians 1:7, 5:10). The canons were devised by the Church to address problems of Church order over the centuries. On the one hand, they are not unchangeable norms and embodiments of the faith. This, because circumstances do change and the situation which they first address disappears sometimes. However, many circumstances and conditions are fairly stable and the canons continue to express the mind of the Church on many issues. The canons continue in the spirit of the New Testament letters of Sts. Paul, Peter, John, etc. who often given specific and concrete directions to Christians regarding the appropriate Christian way of living. The canons also prescribe how certain administrative and sacramental practices should be carried out. Rules regarding the clergy, permitted and prohibited marriages, At the entrance of Meteora L-R: Alexandra Chassley, Alexandra Camillos, Alexander Howe, Sophia Cassimatis, Nonda Maroullis, Patricia Cassimatis, Nancy Nesiriti, Scott James sequence of events every day. Not because we didn t have a wider vocabulary or know any more expressions in Greek, but because we actually did the same thing each day visit different museums and shop at the famous Ermou Street, Monastiraki, Kolonaki and Plaka. Each day we would look forward to exploring new areas of the city of Athens its archaeological sites, its museums and its uniqueness as a capital city. Not only did we discover the historical heart of this city, but we enjoyed the laid-back lifestyle, the cuisine, three hour coffee rendezvous, and definitely the nightlife and bouzoukia where we partied until daylight. Every weekend the University spoiled us rotten and took us on tours throughout the mainland. We were extremely fortunate to see so many significant and beautiful cities. The first of these weekends we visited Meteora. Being 1200 feet above sea level, we greatly appreciated the Byzantine frescos and mosaics and felt a strong connection with the Greek Orthodox faith. It was an absolutely unforgettable experience, when snow flakes lightly fell Holy Confession and Holy Communion, the synodical organization of the Church and other such topics are embodiments of the mind of the Church on these topics, but they do not represent, generally speaking, radical departures in the teaching of the Church as expressed in Scriptures. * * * From the Orthodox Church: 455 Questions and Answers, by Stanley S. Harakas, published by Light and Life. If you have any questions about the Orthodox faith which you would like answered in the VEMA, send them to Vema -Q.&A., P.O.Box M59 Marrickville South, NSW 2204 or them to: as we reached the top of the monastery. Soon after, we arrived at the magical town of Metsovo, where we enjoyed the most exquisite lunch, company, unusual tourist shops and intimate art galleries. On our journey back to Athens it was spectacular to drive through the countryside which was completely cloaked in thick, white snow, a world poles apart from ours in Australia. As we were totally spellbound by this glorious snow, we were very keen to go skiing. After continuously begging our teacher to grant us our wish, we were thrilled to arrive at a ski field, only to realise that we would travel up the ski field via the chairlift and also down the ski field via chairlift, with of course a coffee break in between. Needless to say, there wasn t much of a queue for the chairlift on the way down Having studied the history of Ancient Greece at school and university, it was incredibly special to finally visit some of the most significant sites and cities of the Ancient World - the Parthenon, Delphi, Olympia, Mycenae, Corinth and Epidauros - which provided the foundations for our world today. On other weekend excursions, we visited Thessaloniki, a stunning city, quite distinct from what we had grown accustomed to in Athens, the beautiful Italianlike town of a Nafplio, and Cape Sounion with the magnificent Temple of Poseidon. As our final examination was looming, which incorporated a section on Greek political history, we were excited to visit Parliament House. It was here that we learnt of the triumphs of Dionysios Solomos and came to appreciate the political struggles experienced by Greece in the not-so-distant past. From this experience we gained much more than we ever could have imagined. Not only did our committed and patient tutors teach us how to communicate in Greek, but they took us for coffee and partied with us introducing us to the new hip clubs all over Athens. We also made lasting friendships with students not only from Australia, but also with students studying in Greece and students living all around the world. In navigating the crammed streets of Athens and experiencing Athenian life, we felt, by the end of the program, completely comfortable and developed a strong love for the city. Since returning to Australia, we have come to realise that we are much more rounded individuals (even discovering our love for olives!). The course opened our minds and allowed us to appreciate our family s origins and heritage, while also prompting our newfound respect and admiration for Greece. Completely entranced by our experiences in January, we encouraged our family to visit in July - this time to Kythera. Our skills in persuasion proved successful, as even before returning to Australia in February, all flights had been booked and confirmed for the July family holiday! It was incredibly special to orientate our parents around the city of Athens and point out specific places in which we formed fond memories only six months before. Finally reaching Kythera for the first time, we were all overwhelmed by its beauty and character. Keen to explore all the areas of Kythera our Yiayias had told us about, we came to appreciate our family s humble, yet rich roots and the hardships experienced by our grandparents generation. The questions regarding our self-identity, which we were so desperately seeking an answer to, were addressed and solved during our studies at the University of Athens and through delving into our cultural and familial history in Kythera.

10 The Greek Australian VEMA OCTOBER /30 TO BHMA Health HEALTH NEWS WITH DR. THEO PENKLIS * October is the month where the National Breast Cancer Foundation, as part of its Pink Ribbon campaign, hold the Pink Ribbon Breakfast. The Pink Ribbon Breakfast project gives people the opportunity to host or attend an event to raise funds for breast cancer research. Many of you may see the Pink Ribbon logo of the National Breast Cancer Foundation or be invited to attend one of the many breakfasts that will be held during October. Around one in eleven women develop breast cancer in Australia and the role of the pink ribbon project is to increase awareness of the importance of research and its role in breast health and to provide opportunities to raise funds for vital breast cancer research. What are breast lumps? Lumps in the breast can be cancerous or noncancerous. Non-cancerous lumps and cysts (fluid filled lumps) are more common and may be due to infections, blocked milk ducts or a non-cancerous growth called a fibroadenoma. Breast cancer is less common than non-cancerous lumps but still occurs in about one in eleven Australian women. It may be picked up by screening X-ray or mammogram or found by you or your doctor. What causes breast cancer? The exact causes of breast cancer are still the subject of scientific research. However, we are still aware of a number of risk factors and ways to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer. Risk factors for breast cancer AGE: The risk of breast cancer increases with age. A woman of 70 years has a ten times Men 'should have children younger' Men should be encouraged to have children when they are young to avoid fertility problems later in life, a NSW medical expert says. Professor Michael Chapman, head of women's and children's health at the University of NSW, says it is now "almost manly not to have a child", Fairfax newspapers report. A new national survey found that only 2 per cent of people believe male infertility is the problem when couples are childless - but more than a third of IVF treatments are for men over 40. Prof Chapman believes one solution would be to persuade men to have children before their early 30s by providing strong role models to boost the status of fatherhood, Fairfax reports. AAP BREAST CANCER: JOIN A PINK RIBBON BREAKFAST greater risk of breast cancer than a 40 year old woman. FAMILY HISTORY: Breast cancer can run in families. A woman whose mother or sister has had breast cancer has an increased risk of breast cancer. In some families there can be a bad gene for breast cancer and typically around half of the female members develop breast cancer, usually before the age of 40, and often involving both breasts. REPRODUCTIVE FACTORS: The later a woman begins having children, the higher the risk of her having breast cancer. Breast feeding for at least three months is thought to be a protective factor and women who have never breast fed have an increased chance of developing breast cancer. DIET: The best diet to reduce the risk of breast cancer is a diet high in fibre, rich in fruit and vegetables and low in animal fat. ALCOHOL: A woman who has two standard drinks per day (that is, two glasses of wine or two nips of spirits) increases her risk of breast cancer by 40-70%. EXERCISE: At least four hours a week of regular exercise significantly reduces a woman s risk of breast cancer. Being overweight is also a risk factor for breast cancer. Exercise helps control weight gain. HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY: There is some evidence that hormone replacement therapy is involved in promoting the growth of breast cancer. What are the warning signs of breast cancer? Early detection of a change in the breast tissue will minimise the potential for a serious problem to develop. So if any changes are noted in the breast tissue, one needs to seek medical advice. Some common changes that can be early warning signs are: By Crystal Ja Dimpling of the skin or any changes to breast texture or shape Changes to nipple shape or unexplained nipple discharge Breast lumps Skin changes or skin thickening Underarm tenderness It is important to note that most breast changes are not cancer. However, if you note any of the above warning signs, see your doctor as soon as possible so he /she can reassure you that everything is alright or arrange the appropriate assessment. How often should a woman have breast checks? All women should practice regular breast self-examination. By doing regular breast selfexamination you get to know how your breasts look and feel so that you will notice any changes that may appear. Breast self-examination should be performed once a month, just after a period. If the woman no longer has periods, she should choose a day that she will remember each month and examine her breasts at the same time each month. To be most effective, breast self-examination should be done regularly and carefully. Have your doctor explain to you the correct procedure for self breast examination. The Cancer Council recommends that women from the age of 40 continue self breast examination and have their doctor examine their breasts at least once a year. A free screening mammogram is available in New South Wales to women over 40 every 2 years through the Breast Screen Programme. For women years, the programme more actively targets this age group, because it is this age group whose screening has been shown to be the most effective. Over 70 years of age, breast screening is still available. Women in this age group are still at high risk of breast cancer, but may have other health problems. Therefore, their need for screening may be governed by other factors. Investigations used in the assessment of breast lumps MAMMOGRAM: A mammogram is a breast X-ray. It is the most useful test for diagnosing breast cancer. However, it is not the final proof that a lump can be serious, nor should a mammogram which is normal be conclusive evidence that the patient does not have breast cancer. This is because a patient with a normal mammogram may have a breast lump which is palpable clinically. ULTRASOUND: An ultrasound is sometimes needed to get images of certain lumps in some women s breasts. This additional information will assist with diagnosis. It is usually used for younger women (especially premenopausal women) who have dense breast tissue. BREAST BIOPSY: A biopsy is a taking of the piece of the lump for testing. This can be done by inserting a needle into the breast to get some cells from the lump. These three tests, mammogram, ultrasound and biopsy are used to assess breast lumps to determine if they are cancer. It is important to remember that not all breast lumps are cancer and could be cysts or other benign tumours called fibroadenomas. It is however important to remember that early detection of a breast lump by the practice of regular self breast examination and appropriate screening mammography could save your life! If you can, join a Pink Ribbon Breakfast during October and support research for breast cancer! * The information given in this article is of a general nature and readers should seek advice from their own medical practitioner before embarking on any treatment. Thank you to doctors dreaming of medical breakthroughs Growing new body parts or rewiring the nerves of quadriplegics so they can walk again may be the stuff of which medical dreams are made. But not for long, perhaps. Whereas 50 years ago, all children diagnosed with leukaemia would die, medical research has given the world many unexpected gifts of life in more recent times. Today, ten leading Australian researchers have offered their thoughts on what they hope will be the medical breakthroughs of the future. Australian of the Year Ian Frazer heads the group that predicts, among a mix of other hopeful forecasts, that within ten years gene profiling will revolutionise the way patients are treated. Fellow researcher and gene expert Professor John Shine said progress with the human genome project could one day deliver specific health plans for every individual. "In the future, every person will be able to look at their particular individual genetic makeup, and say 'I'm at risk of developing prostate cancer later... therefore prevent the onset of disease," he said. "Or if I do get a particular cancer then the treatment for my cancer may be quite different from somebody else's." Prof Shine said that while family history allows this to be done in a rudimentary way, in the future it could be as accurate as a blood test. "We'd be preventing their development by cutting them off at the source." Even more impressive is the possible surgical procedures on foetuses while still in the womb - something already in the trial stages. Professor Terry Dwyer said operations prior to birth could potentially reduce congenital heart disease fatalities, the biggest cause of infancy death. "One of the areas that the world is interested in is extending operations from after birth to before birth," he said. "We would look at (operating) while they're still developing, so that development after the operation was more normal." The release of the report, Then, Now... Imagine, compiled by Research Australia, coincides with the organisation's Thank You Day, which aims to give the public a chance to acknowledge the people that brought about the first bionic ear, effective ulcer treatments or how to prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Research Australia chief executive Rebecca James said Thank You Day was aimed at raising community awareness of the part medical research plays in society. "Over the last 40 years through medical research, we've got an eight year longer lifespan... (medical research) is about people keeping healthy, active and productive," she said. Ms James said it was important to raise Australia's "intellectual capital". "In the international setting, Australia's research sector is actually very small," she said. "We punch above our weight, our output is huge... (but) in years to come we're going to need more resources if we're going to keep chase internationally." AAP

11 OCTOBER 2006 The Greek Australian VEMA TO BHMA 13/31 CLINICAL INSIGHTS INTO HEALTH AND NATURAL SOLUTIONS BY CHRISTINA SCALONE* BHSc, Dip. Bot. Med, Dip. Hom, Dip. Nut All diseases begin in the gut Hippocrates The Father of Medicine ( BC) Good health begins in the colon. There appears to be great wisdom in that statement. It can be definitely stated that without proper elimination of waste products, there are serious repercussions to our health. For the bibliophiles... Byzantium By R. Loverance (British Museum Press) This book contains a basic outline of the Byzantine Empire s history and as such is more for the casual reader than those who want an in-depth knowledge of the empire. It does, however, contain a number of photos displaying some fine examples of Byzantine craftsmanship (some of which clearly demonstrate the link between Byzantine and Celtic art). Byzantium: The Bridge from Antiquity to the Middle Ages By M. Angold (Phoenix Press) This little paperback covers the period dating from the founding of Constantinople to the 10 th century. While this interesting book does not cover the whole of the Byzantine Empire s history and only briefly touches on some topics, it is useful as it does put forward several theories about certain events which other books on Byzantine history merely touch upon. Tal Coward The colon or gut forms part of the digestive system. The digestive system extends form the mouth to the anus. It consists of the gastrointestinal tract (the mouth, throat, oesophagus, and intestines- small and large) and its related organs the salivary glands, the liver and gallbladder and the pancreas. The importance of a properly functioning digestive system for optimum health cannot be stressed enough. It is critical that food taken in at the mouth is properly digested, absorbed and eliminated as it moves through the tract so that our body can gain nutritional benefit from the things we eat. The best nutrition in the world will go to waste if the body is unable to process, absorb and use it. A poorly functioning digestive system can be a major contributor to the development of many diseases. Our immune system is also reliant on a healthy colon and digestive system as about two-thirds of the body s total immune system cells are located within the gastrointestinal tract s mucosal surface, thus making the gut a major immune organ. Digestion occurs as a result of both mechanical and chemical processes. The mechanical processes of digestion include grinding, crushing and mixing of the food mass with digestive juices during its passage through the digestive tract. The digestive process begins in the mouth. Chewing food thoroughly is the first step toward getting the most form the food you eat. It also allows food to mix with saliva, which starts the digestive process. Digestive juices secreted by stomach, liver and pancreas helps to breakdown the carbohydrates, fats and proteins in the food, which are absorbed in the small intestine. The discussion regarding the whole process of digestion and the different roles that our organs, is quite extensive. In this article, the discussion will mainly be focused on the functions of our colon in the process of digestion and different ways to support healthy digestion. The colon (large intestine) is about 5 feet long and its functions are the absorption of water, electrolytes (salts) and the final products of digestion. The large intestine also provides temporary storage for waste products, which serve as a medium for bacteria. The colon is not designed for enhancing absorption but is particularly specialized to conserve the sodium and water that escape absorption in the small intestine. Food spends about 6 to 72 hours in your large intestine before final removal by defaecation. One reason food stays longer in the colon may be that the colon is capable of generating nutrients from food. The food that makes it into the colon is primarily fibre, and the colon contains certain bacteria that can ferment much of this fibre, producing many nutrients necessary for the health of the colon cells. The friendly bacteria that are responsible for the primary amount of healthy colonic fermentation are called the probiotics (pro-life or for life), which include the Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus genus s. These good bacteria prevent the bad bacteria, which cause disease, from taking over the colon. Certain fibres found in chicory, artichoke, soy and rice support these probiotic bacteria. Some fibre isn t fermented, but it is also important because it provides bulk for stool excretion and can bind toxins and waste products for their removal. Thus, the health of the colon is largely determined by the types of the food that are eaten. In particular, dietary fibre is of critical importance in maintaining the health of the colon. Without enough fibre in your diet, waste material tends to accumulate. Accumulation of waste material can lead to various health issues, such as- -Constipation -Diverticular disease -Irritable bowel syndrome -Growth of abnormal microorganisms in the colon like overgrowth of candida albicans -Decrease in immune function (body s protective mechanism) Ways to support healthy digestion: Tips for some healthy habits- Chew thoroughly. When a meal is not well chewed, the food fragments are too big. Since digestive enzymes can only work on the surface of the food fragments, inadequate chewing results in incomplete digestion. This means not only nutrients being left in the food and unabsorbed, but also extra food for bacteria in the colon. This extra bacterial food results in bacterial overgrowth, gas and symptoms of indigestion. Eat regularly. Eat at least every 4-5 hours. Our bodies need regular fuel to maintain blood sugar levels and metabolism but enough time should be given to complete digestion before more food is eaten. Avoid skipping meals by having balanced snacks on hand for busy times. Hunger will lead to poor food choices and overeating if ignored. Avoid overeating. It is a major cause of obesity and stresses the liver and digestive tract. Spread your meals evenly throughout the day and don t leave the largest meal until the evening. Our digestive fire is at peak around noon. Avoid foods that can cause allergies. The most common food allergens include milk proteins, wheat, soy, some shellfish and peanuts. Eat with awareness. Ask yourself how hungry you are before and after each meal. Take five minutes to relax before a meal if you feel stressed. Prepare as many meals yourself as possible touching, tasting and smelling food before you eat it will prepare the body for digestion. Adequate water intake. Avoid drinking excessively during a meal as this can reduce enzyme activity. One glass of fluid with meals is enough. Drink at least 2 litres of water between meals each day. Prepare. Shop for fresh food re-gularly. The best preparation is knowledge about healthy food options- a well-informed choice will be the healthiest choice. Include more raw food in your diet. Have half of your vegetable and fruit intake raw (e.g. salads). Fruits and vegetables contain enzymes, which aid digestion, so aim to eat some with every meal. Exercise. Aim for at least three or four times per weak. Exercise works the diaphragm, which massages the intestines and thereby improves digestion. It also regulates appetite, blood sugar control and metabolism. 90% for the body and 10% for the soul. Make sure that the majority of food consumed is within the healthy range (90%) and allow the odd treat to satisfy your mind and soul. Eat positively. A balanced healthy diet doesn t have to be boring, bland, time consuming or expensive. Take control of your diet and health by making your own choices and stop allowing industry to dictate what you eat. Regular cleansing of your bowels. This can be done for a day or two each month, with fresh juices (of fruits and veggies), herbal teas (such as dandelion, chamomile) and light diet. Prepare and eat your food with joy. FOODS THAT ENHANCE DIGESTION: Certain foods can provide dige-stive enzyme support, such as fresh pineapple and papaya, which contain the enzyme bromelain and other fresh vegetable and herbs. Support the growth of probiotic bacteria. Foods that will supply probiotic bacteria include yogurts, kefir and other foods that have been fermented with Lactobacillus or certain Bifidobacteria. Foods that will nourish probiotic bacteria include soy fibre, chicory, artichoke and rice fibre. Foods with high fibre content- peas, beans and lentils; wholemeal or multigrain bread, cereals- oats, linseed, barley, raw nuts, seeds; fresh and dried fruits and vegetables and water soluble fibre such as psyllium. Some healthy diet options: Breakfast You can start your day with a glass of warm water mixed with freshly squeezed lemon juice before taking breakfast. Steamed rice, with stewed pears, sprinkle of cashews Bircher muesli and stewed apple Porridge with fresh fruit and sprinkled with almonds Toasted rice cake with banana Rice cakes fill with banana and stewed pears Rice cake/rice bubbles garnish with pureed soft tofu an stewed apple Scrambled/boiled eggs with grated vegetables and goat s cheese/feta o Snacks a piece of fruit, e.g., paw paw, rock melon, mango, fresh fruit smoothie, raw nuts like almonds, herbal teas Lunch Vegetable soup with potato, pumpkins and leeks; rice bread brushed over with olive oil and sprinkled with parsley and crushed cashews. Beans or lentils, add mung bean sprouts, carrots, celery, snow peas, peas, and shallots. Dress with sea salt, olive oil and sprinkle with cashews. Cooked rice noodles, with steamed vegetables. Garnish with garlic in olive oil and sprinkle with chives. Sardines and roasted vegetables or salad Chicken breast with salad and tabbouleh Dinner Chicken breast/turkey breast grilled, steamed vegetables Roast lamb; steamed vegetables; dry-baked potato and pumpkin Grilled fish with salad lettuce, leek, parsley; dry baked potato, steamed beans, carrots, cabbage For undergoing a thorough elimination/detoxification programme, or if you need further information consult a naturopath, who can guide you through different phases of the detox programme. * Christina Scalone is a very experienced and successful naturopath with over 20 years experience. She holds a Degree in Health Science, a Diploma in Botanical Medicine, Diploma in Homoeopathy and a Diploma in Nutrition. She has maintained a full time practice, has held a position as a senior practioner/ naturopathic consultant, a clinic manager and trainer for Blackmores and is a clinic student supervisor as well as a lecturer at the Australian College of Natural Therapies. She also maintains her own private practice with successful results.

12 The Greek Australian VEMA 14/32 TO BHMA OCTOBER 2006 Some years ago the well-known Kytherian academic and publisher, Elias Marsellos, had a dream: how to unite people of Kytherian descent and philo-kytherians spread around the globe. Elias came up with the idea of the Institute of Kytheraismos through which we would be able to connect the real world of Kythera (both the present and the past) with the allegorical fantastic world of the Kythera in our dreams. 2 nd International Symposium of Kytheraismos: The new spirit of the Kytherian Diaspora In 2004 an inaugural conference was held in Kythera to map out the future of Kythe-raismos. On 15 September 2006 the Second International Symposium of Kytheraismos was held in the magnificent Hellenic Club of Canberra as Elias dream took one giant step towards its realisation. Hellenic Club of Canberra It was just on an hour before the scheduled arrival of the Prime Minister and already a crowd was milling. Registrants were being given identification badges with their name and town or towns of origin. It was almost like a badge of distinction to wear throughout the conference. Prime Minister John Howard then entered the room and in the view of television cameras acknowledged the valuable contribution of Greek Australians. The opening was reported in the mainstream press and on the nightly TV news programs. Afterwards, the Prime Minister mingled with the delegates for morning coffee. Over 40 papers were presented to the conference in nine separate plenary sessions. The speakers covered a diversity of topics and themes. Each added his or her own particular perspective to the idea of being Greek- Kytherian. At times the audience laughed and at other times cried with speakers as we were taken on a roller coaster of emotions. Although speakers in the main kept to their allotted 15 minutes, the information and discourse exchanged in the course of two and half days of the conference were exceptional. Following the official opening of the symposium by Prime Minister Howard, Elias Marsellos officially welcomed the delegates and friends to the conference and declared that the theme of the conference was to be the new spirit of the Kytherian diaspora. Elias emphasised that Kytheraismos is an idea, a way of thinking, about what people think of Kythera. He was confident that the Institute of Kytheraismos with its bi annual conferences will serve as a prototype or model for other Greek expatriate organisations around the world. Chris Lourandos, the president of the Kytherian Brotherhood of Canberra, gave an entertaining speech about his experiences in Canberra and the battle to create the Hellenic Club, including the early anti-greek feelings of the local anglo-saxon bureaucrats in his attempts to persuade the government to allocate land to the Greek community for the proposed development. Chris vision is now the magnificent Hellenic Club in Woden. Paul Mathers (formerly Mavromattes) shared his passion of tracing historical documents and researching into Australian- Kytherian history by presenting The Early Years, a nostalgic trip in which he shared with the audience photographs of some of the early clerical figures in his family (such as Father Fokas, the first Greek Orthodox Priest at Aghia Triada). Paul discussed the activities of the Greek Women s League in 1914 and also produced a copy of a fascinating notice advertising the Grand Kytherian Annual Ball at the Empress Ballroom in the old Mark Foys Building on 26 April 1938 in aid of the Kytherian Benevolent Society of Australia. Paul Mathers drew considerable laughs when he recounted that as a student his Greek heritage had not escaped his then school teachers, one of whom had difficulty in remembering his Greek surname but had no difficulty in referring to Paul as a degenerate member of a once great race. Professor George Kanarakis, the eminent professor of Greek literature, discussed the tapestry of Kytherian literary creation and the influence of Kytherian writers in Australian- Greek literature. Professor Kanerakis has spent 30 years in Australia researching the Hellenic literary influence in this country and described the poetry of some of the early Kytherian settlers as a fascinating phenomenon. Later in the symposium, Professor Kanerakis was so moved by one speaker that from the chair he declared: I arrived at this conference a Pireoti (a reference to his birthplace of Piraeus) but I am leaving as a Kytherian!. The eminent Australian-Greek medical pioneer, Dr Archie Kalokerinos, enthralled the audience with his from the heart narration of how he first encountered the terrible plight of young aboriginal children in the NSW outback who at that time experienced the highest mortality rates in the world (to Australia s eternal shame). Drawing on the values and beliefs instilled in him by his Kytherian parents and mightily proud of his Kytherian heritage and upbringing - Dr Kalokerinos told how he persevered in the face of resistance from many of his peers and from the medical establishment Official opening of the symposium Delegates at the symposium until his theories took hold and the aboriginal infant mortality rate was drastically cut. Peter Prineas, the author of Katsehamos and the Great Idea, gave an entertaining account of how he came to write a book about his late grandfather, Peter Feros, and the historic Roxy Theatre in Bingara in country NSW. The first of the overseas contingent of speakers was Professor George Leontsinis, Professor of Modern Greek History and of Teaching of History at the University of Athens, and arguably the most influential and important academic ever to come out of Kythera. Professor Leontsinis circulated beforehand his paper entitled Kytherian Associations and Foundations in Greece and Abroad and in his address to the conference called on the various associations to come together to promote common interests. In the afternoon session, Kytherian icon, Professor Manuel Aroney, gave a typically entertaining speech about the Kytherian Australian inter-relationship and how, as a young academic, he persuaded his superiors to allow him to pursue higher studies in Greece which at the time was probably still regarded as a third world country. Manuel Aroney has since gone on to achieve the highest honours from the Greek Government but at the same time has never forgotten his humble Kytherian background. His continuing role as a trustee of the Nicholas Aroney Foundation and the laudable philanthropic and charitable activities of Manuel and his fellow trustees has changed the Australian-Kytherian landscape forever. That evening a splendid reception was held at the Greek Embassy in Canberra by the newlyappointed Ambassador of the Hellenic Republic, Mr George Zois and his charming wife, Christina Zois. More than 200 conference delegates mingled in the beautiful Italianate-style mansion that houses the embassy and had a chance to discuss and reflect on the day s events in between sampling some truly exquisite food. It was a great way to end the first day of the symposium. The crowds swelled on Saturday morning for the start of what was to be the longest day when more than 20 papers presented. The first speaker was the academic, Dr Vassiliki Chryssanthopoulou, Visiting Fellow from the Hellenic Folklore Research Centre, Academy of Athens, who spoke on the topic Gender, Migration and Identity: Focus on Kytherian Women. Dr Chryssanthopoulou had previously come to Australia in 2004 and had interviewed a number of women in Sydney and Canberra as well as on Kythera and Piraeus. Women have contributed to the Kytherian identity and motherhood within the various Kytherian communities is taken seriously. The theme on women was also pursued by Dr Nicholas Glytsos, Researcher Emeritus of Economics of the Centre of Planning and Economic Research in Athens and a first time visitor to our shores, who presented a most interesting paper on an aspect of Kytherian womanhood that tends to be overlooked, namely, the women who stayed behind as their husbands, sons or brothers travelled to Australia searching for fortune. Dr Glytsos theme was that male emigration to Australia would not have been possible if women could not replace the role and activities of the departing man. Kytherian women were the invisible backbone of the migration process. At this point, immediate past president George Vardas took to the podium to present his paper entitled Australian Aphrodite: The role of women in the Kytherian Brotherhood. His presentation derived in part from research carried out by an eminent American sociologist, Professor Vassilikie Demos (herself of Kytherian descent) who had visited Australia almost 20 years ago and had conducted extensive interviews of Kytherian women in Sydney and Brisbane and who had been kind enough to several papers that she had written on the subject. George had also prepared a questionnaire which 12 members of the Kytherian Ladies Auxiliary completed dealing with various issues of Kytherian identity and the women s self-perceptions. The talk also covered the history of the Kytherian Ladies Auxiliary and the more recent successes of the Kytherian Young Mothers Group and Mums n Bubs as George Vardas traced the pivotal role that women

13 OCTOBER 2006 The Greek Australian VEMA TO BHMA 15/33 Cont. from previous page have played in the Australian Kytherian diaspora in reproducing Greek ethnicity. Sadly, he is still waiting for his coffee to be served. The history and notable achievements of the Triffileio Foundation were described by Dr George Argyropoulos who praised the first class old people s home at Potamos in Kythera and acknowledged the invaluable assistance given by George Hatziplis, the well-known philo-kytherian benefactor. After the morning break, the only current resident of Kythera to attend the symposium, and former Eparhos of the island, Emmanuel Kasimatis, addressed the conference on the theme of investment in Kythera and the various opportunities that await investors. He also discussed in brief some of the contentious environmental issues that beset development on the island as a reminder that any future development should be sensitive to both the ecology and the historical amenity of the island. One of the few delegates from Brisbane, the gregarious Dr Nick Cominos, addressed the conference on the disappointing downturn in interest within the Kytherian community of Brisbane and put out a challenge that we should embrace the later Australian-Kytherian generations in order to keep the spirit of Kytheraismos going. One of the most enthralling and informative presentations then followed with our American friends, Vikki Vrettos Fraioli and Terry Chlentzos Keramaris, discussing how the Kythera family website had brought them together in the Kytherian Brotherhood of California (an association only 70 members). Through an interesting powerpoint presentation both Vikki and Terry demonstrated how easy it is to compile a family tree and how to film an aged relative recounting his or her life story, identifying people in old photographs and so on. Vikki has created a most interesting website, called Kythera Connections, at ections/menu6.html on which most of the material which they presented at the symposium can be found. Their presentation was tinged with a note of sadness as it transpired that their uncle, Pete Chlenztos, a 97 year old former pole vaulter who had competed fro Greece at the 1932 Olympic Games, had passed away only two days earlier. The final talk of the morning session was given by the well-liked Kytherian historian and genealogist, Peter Makarthis, from Inverell. Actually, Peter was born Peter Mc- Carthy (of good Irish stock) but after marrying into a Kytherian family he might as well be called Peter Makarthis. Peter traced the early history of the Greeks in Inverell and the early influence of Kytherian settlers in the area. Peter is currently working on a book whose publication is eagerly awaited. After a well-deserved lunch, the conference delegates - still numbering well over heard an impassioned story by Ruby Brown about her father, the inimitable George Feros, who was quite a character in Byron Bay and whose persistence in raising funds for aged care has led to the establishment of the highly successful Feros Care Ltd. The ability of a Kytherian from humble origins to achieve what he or she sets out to do remains an impressive and indelible characteristic of the island s descendants. The Kytherian pioneers of the early cafes in Nowra, on the beautiful South Coast of NSW, were the subject of a paper delivered by Robyn Florance, a member of the Shoalhaven Historical Society and the author of a magnificent publication, A Touch of Greece Kytherian youth and experience came together at the symposium in Junction Street: Greek Café Owners of Nowra. Just as she did when the book was launched recently south of Nowra, Robyn told of her interest in researching the many Greek cafes in Nowra, most of which were operated by Kytherians with surnames such as Mavromattes, Aroney, Kepreotis, Castrisos and others. Although there are no Greek cafes left, the Australian-Kytherian legacy lives on. The notable Kytherian engineer and academic, Professor Basil Leftheris, prepared an interesting paper which surveyed the history of Kythera and the interplay of biological and environmental factors that go to make up the Kytherian psyche, both on the island and in the Kytherian diaspora. Professor Leftheris entertained the delegates with a powerpoint presentation featuring some stunning shots of the local flora of the island coupled with photos of some of the historically significant buildings from both the Venetian and British occupation of the island, including the incomparable thirteen arch stone bridge at Katouni. Professor Leftheris concluded his presentation by applauding Kytheraismos as the archive of Kytherian life, the continuity between the old and the new and challenging us to use the strength of our common roots to do something extraordinary for future generations. Lawyer and local government councillor John Comino, himself a direct descendant of one of the first Kytherian pioneers to Australia, presented his paper on Kytherian Australians as European citizens and explained the bureaucratic intricacies of taking Greek dual citizenship as well as avoiding (for Kytherian males under the age of 45 years) the risks of military service. John Comino was also one of the driving forces on the Sydney organising committee for the Kytheraismos symposium. The last session was devoted to the all important Kytherian youth and delegates had an opportunity to hear from some exuberant young Kytherians. Mary Londy of Brisbane was forthright in her call for greater participation in Kytherian Greek activities, drawing on her experiences with the Kytherian Youth of Brisbane. Mary suggested that the internet and the widely-used MSN-type chat rooms could be utilised to create a virtual Kytherian chat room to which young Kytherians all over the world could connect. Sophia and Patricia Cassimatis spoke eloquently of their first experience in Greece in the winter of 2005/2006 when they attended an intensive Greek language course at the University of Athens. So enriched were they by that experience that Sophia and Patricia persuaded their parents to return to Greece with them in July 2006 and to visit for the first time the island of Kythera. There is huge potential for cultural and educational exchanges between Australia and Greece for the benefit of our youth. Garifalia Castrisios, a fourth year medical student from Tasmania, recounted her incredible work experiences and sojourn in Kythera where she spent 10 weeks at the hospital at Potamos. Garifalia was exposed to a variety of working conditions and medical training which it is unlikely she would have encountered in a mainstream Australian hospital. At the same time, Garifalia was enthralled by the island s charms and yearns to return again. Alex Poulos, a young lawyers and property developer from Queensland, gave an insightful presentation on some of the issues confronting Kytherian youth and came up with a most interesting and promising proposal: the establishment of a youth hostel in Kythera. Suggesting that there are many old and disused buildings on the island which could be modified and converted for hostel accommodation, Alex argued that such a hostel could be the catalyst for organising meaningful tours of Kythera by our youth so that they can better appreciate their cultural and historical heritage. Penelope Samios spoke about the Kytherian youth in Sydney and the ground-breaking work of the Kytherian Association in promoting Greek folk dancing. Delegates retired at the end of this most entertaining day to get ready for a splendid Dinner Dance organised by the Kytherian Brother-hood of Canberra at the Hellenic Club. There was considerable kefi as delegates and guests danced the night away and rejoiced in the coming together of Kytherians from all over Australia, Greece and the United States. The sight of the children lying prostrate on the stage watching the large screen replay of John Howard s opening speech was also intriguing: were they enthralled or bemused? On the final morning of the symposium, Angelo Notaras, gave an informative overview of various projects currently under way. Angelo spoke with typical enthusiasm about the ongoing progress of the Kythera family website; the translation into English of the first book published in Greek in Australia ( I Zoi En Afstralia ); the translation of the magnificent work by Emmanuel Calligeros on Kytherian surnames and the current project for the preservation, restoration and eventual exhibition of some 2,200 glass photographic slides of the famous Kytherian photographer, Panagiotis Fatseas. Angelo Notaras was followed by the Sydney webmaster of the Kythera family website, George Poulos, who reinforced the need for Kytherians to gather important family records and oral histories and post them to the website. As Vikki Fraioli and Terry Chlentzos clearly demonstrated, it is quite simple to document the recollections and knowledge of our older generations so as to preserve that knowledge for the benefit of future generations. As George pointed out, every time an old person dies a library literally burns down. One of the most illuminating and interesting presentations was given by Peter Vanges, historian and a former president of the Kytherian Association of Australia. Peter posed the question: Who was the first Kytherian in Australia? Was it Athanasios Kominos who arrived in Australia in 1873 and who many believed to be the first Kytherian? Or was there another Kytherian who came earlier? Peter Vanges enthralled the delegates as to his detective work in searching through official records, visiting graves and talking to descendants in concluding that the first Kytherian was in fact Emmanuel Kritharis who arrived in this country in Peter s paper is published at. The final talk before morning coffee was an audio-visual powerpoint presentation given by Emanuel Comino (aka o Marmaras ). Emanuel was the first Kytherian to mobilise and campaign for the return of the Parthenon sculptures taken by Lord Elgin and currently housed in the British Museum in London. After morning coffee, the final plenary session got under way. The President of the Kytherian Brotherhood of Australia, Victor Kepreotis, gave a heartfelt and at times tearyeyed account of his love of Kythera and all that being a Greek-Kytherian in Australia means. The symposium delegates then heard a pleasant tale, beautifully related by Mary Matis of Canberra, of the American Kytherian connection. Mary described how she grew up in Kythera before going to the heavily industrialised and strife-torn city of Cleveland in the United States at the tender age of 9 years to live with her aunt and uncle. A decade on, after meeting her future husband during a holiday on Kythera, Mary moved to Australia where she has lived in Canberra ever since. Poppy Stellios spoke of the historical and community events in the NSW country town of Dubbo and the Kytherian influence in establishing a Greek Orthodox church in the town. The sometimes controversial issue of development on the island was the subject of an interesting talk given by Eva-Marie Prineas, an architect who has recently returned after getting married on Kythera. Eva-Marie described her long term program for restoring and renovating an old house on the island and ensuring that the renovation was sympathetic to the architectural heritage of the building in accordance with the principles of the ICO- MOS Burra Charter. The last presenter was the Queensland Kytherian stalwart, John Carras, who had on the first day presented Prime Minister Howard with a cap bearing the Australian flag and the expression I love Kythera. John drew on his own experience with retirement home planning in Queensland to call for the establishment of a retirement home on the island. At the conclusion of the symposium, Chris Lourandos produced a tape recorder and played to a silent audience a traditional song about metanastes by the late Vicky Moscholiou. There was hardly a dry eye as the pain of the xenitia and the distance from our Kytherian roots told on many of the delegates. It was a very poignant and moving moment. The mood and achievements of the symposium were probably best captured in Professor Kanarakis recital of these memorable words from the immortal Greek poet, C.P. Cavafy: To have come this far is no small achievement: what you have done is a glorious thing. Even this first step is a long way above the ordinary world. Under the tutelage of Elias Marsellos the Institute of Kytheraismos has indeed come a long way and it is hoped that the momentum gained by the Second International Symposium of Kytheraismos in Canberra will not be lost but will serve to bolster and enhance the new spirit of the Kytherian diaspora ahead of the next symposium in Kythera in September George Vardas September 2006

14 The Greek Australian VEMA 16/34 TO BHMA OCTOBER 2006 ÉÅÑÁ ÁÑ ÉÅÐÉÓÊÏÐÇ ÁÕÓÔÑÁËÉÁÓ GREEK ORTHODOX ARCHDIOCESE OF AUSTRALIA NINTH NATIONAL YOUTH CONFERENCE The Responsibility of Youth in Contemporary Society Brisbane 25th - 28th January, 2007

15 OCTOBER 2006 The Greek Australian VEMA TO BHMA 17/35 Food & Wine Family favourites: Sweet Treats By Imogen Coward I must confess to having a sweet tooth. Place me in front of a plate of baklava or a black forest cake and I m as happy as can be. Finding recipes that work, aren t too much bother, and that people never tire of is difficult. Whether friends are visiting for afternoon tea or you simply want to give the family a treat this weekend why not try some of my own family s favourite recipes. Orange Syrup Cake Very reminiscent of Halva, this cake is very, very sweet, heavy and moist but delicious. Ingredients: 1 large orange (preferably navel) 2 cups water 2 cups caster sugar 2/3 cup brandy 250g unsalted butter, softened 1 cup caster sugar, extra 4 eggs 1 ½ cups self-raising flour Method: Preheat oven to 170E C. While oven is warming up, grease and line with paper (bottom and sides) a deep 22cm round cake tin. Peel orange and finely chop both the peel and orange flesh (throw away seeds). Place orange, water, 2 cups sugar and brandy in a medium saucepan. Heat gently until sugar dissolves then bring to the boil. Once boiling reduce heat and simmer (uncovered) for 15 mins or until orange skin is tender. Strain syrup into pyrex jug and put remaining orange solids aside. In a small bowl beat butter and extra sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs individually, beating mixture until just combined. Place mixture in a large bowl. Stir in flour and orange solids. Pour mixture into greased lined cake tin and bake in oven until cooked - approx 1hr and 10mins. Cover cake with paper during last 1/4 hr of baking. While cake is cooking simmer syrup until slightly thickened. Once cake is cooked remove from oven, let stand for 5 mins, then turn out onto cooling rack and pour hot syrup over cake (pour half the syrup onto the underside, then invert cake and pour rest of syrup over the top of the cake). Cool then sprinkle with chopped walnuts before serving. May be served with whipped cream or ice-cream. Chewy Anzac Slice This slice tastes very much like ANZAC biscuits, but they re quite chewy (no need to dunk them in a cup of tea!). Very fast and easy to make, there never seems to be enough! Ingredients: 2 cups one minute / instant rolled oats 2 cups plain flour 1 ½ cups desicated coconut 1 ½ cups raw sugar 250g butter 4 tbsp honey (mild variety e.g. yellow box) 4 tbsp water 1 tspn bi-carb soda Method: Grease 25cmx35cm (1 ½ cm deep) tray. In a large bowl combine oats, flour, coconut and sugar. Place butter, honey and water. Heat gently and, when butter is melted, stir in soda. Pour liquid mixture into dry ingredients and stir until combined. Press mixture into greased tray. Bake in a moderate oven (180EC) for approx 25 mins or until golden brown. Leave slice in tray and cut into squares/rectangles while warm. Director urges people to make healthier food choices American director Richard Linklater sees McDonald's as the Goliath of the fast food industry and he's hoping to encourage the Davids of the world to choose healthier options. "They win because they have got the billions of dollars and big advertising," says Linklater. "It is a formidable opposition with all that power, but things can change." Linklater is in Australia to promote the release of his low budget feature film, Fast Food Nation, based on the book by Eric Schlosser. A work of fiction, the film examines the increasing dominance of fast food and argues that the industry has used political influence to increase profits at the expense of consumers health. Fast Food Nation boasts a strong cast, including Greg Kinnear, Bruce Willis, Ethan Hawke, Avril Lavigne and Wilmer Valderrama. The film had its world premiere at the Cannes International Film Festival in May and has prompted a number of fast food chains, including McDonald's, to speak out. McDonald's Australia has attempted to distance itself from the film. Fast Food Nation opens nationally on October 26. AAP PROBLEM WITH ALCOHOL OR DRUGS? ProviCare is a community based non-profit organisation providing FREE confidential telephone counselling and rehabilitation service for: Users Families Carers ProviCare now provides Free Face-to-Face counselling for individuals and families who are affected by Alcohol or Drugs. If you would like to make an appointment please do not hesitate to call us on the Toll Free number provided below. If you are concerned about your own, or someone else s Alcohol or other Drug use, contact ProviCare on the toll free number. ProviCare is serviced by a team of Registered Psychologists at convenient locations in Sydney. ProviCare counsellors are experienced in the Alcohol and Drug field and are fluent in both Greek and English. TOLL FREE: Monday - Friday 9 am - 5 pm The ProviCare Foundation is a mission of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia Serengeti, Dolce & Gabbana, YSL Choosing a wine for a meal is a pretty straight forward task, right? White wine with fish or chicken, red wine with meat, rosé with er, um, ah... what does rosé go with? Well, strangely enough I think it goes with everything! On a recent trip away I felt like spicing up my take-away dinners so I invested in one trusty bottle of clean skin white shiraz (a rose made of shiraz grapes that are skinned before being crushed). Over a number of nights I enjoyed its contents with a variety of meals including fish and chips, chicken and even a steak hamburger with the works! Now it might sound a little strange, but the white shiraz with its light body, fruity flavour and refreshing acidity coped nicely with each of these meals. If you re after a show piece for your upcoming dinner party, a talking point to be um-ed and ahh-ed over or discussed in hushed, almost reverential tones by admiring drinkers most rosés probably fall short of the mark. However, if you re simply after a nice, inexpensive drop to liven up any meal, why not choose a rosé? Christian Dior, Gucci, Calvin Klein Katerina + Kyriacos Mavrolefteros Dean Psarakis & Mary Krithinakis OPTOMETRISTS 874 Anzac Parade, Maroubra Junction (at bus stop, on RTA block) TEL: (02) We have over 1,200 spectacle frames and sunglasses on display! Silhouette, Adidas, Carrera Polo Ralph Lauren, Oakley, La font

16 OCTOBER 2006 The Greek Australian VEMA TO BHMA 18/36 Travel News in Brief Thirty per cent of Australian travellers to the United States visit New York, so Tourism Massachusetts has opened an office in Australia to entice a chunk of these Aussies to also come to their small and interesting state. Boston is just over three hours drive from New York to the north, plus there's air, train and bus connections too. When you get there, do the walk along The Freedom Trail, a 4.8 kilometre line that connects 16 of Boston's most storied landmarks. Go watch a baseball game and cheer on the Boston Red Sox. Spend hours in bookstores, cafes and watch performers in picturesque squares. Visit Harvard University, where local boy John F Kennedy studied. Massachusetts is famous for its dramatic autumn colours, romantic New England architecture and the exclusive Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard. For foodies, feast on clam chowder and luscious seafood. Now is a great time to go, with Halloween festivities, the annual cranberry harvest and the rich autumn colours in abundance. Details: Visit: People who are looking for a change to the usual beach and BBQ holiday this Christmas might think about spending it in the cold at renowned hotel, The Ritz at Piccadilly in London's West End. The hotel is offering a Christmas package far removed from the sunny climates of Australia. The Ritz Christmas Program starts on December 23 with champagne and canapes before being chauffeur-driven to the theatre of your choice and a post-theatre dinner. On Christmas Eve there's a fivecourse dinner dance after which you can be taken to midnight mass at the Guards' Chapel of the Wellington Barracks, and enjoy mulled wine and mince pies on your return. Christmas Day involves a traditional six-course lunch, before The Queen's Christmas Speech is broadcast in The Rivoli Bar. Guests will be invited to have lunch at The Ritz Restaurant on Boxing Day before they leave. Details: Call Creative Holidays is offering travellers the chance to save up to $1,700 per person on its seven-night cruise of the Straits of Malacca. The cruise leaves from Singapore and visits Port Klang, the archipelago Langkawi, Krabi, the island of Phuket and Malaysian Chinese influenced Penang before returning to Singapore. The SuperStar Gemini Earlybird offer is priced from $1,226 per person, twin share, and includes accommodation on board, all meals, most on-board entertainment and activities plus passenger handling and fuel surcharges. The offer is valid until December 28 for travel January 7 and April 15 next year. Details: Visit For the green-thumbed and historicallyinclined, Insights Country Roads, Gardens and Stately Homes of Britain has an escorted tour of some of the grandest gardens and listed buildings across Britain. The tour Travel highlights will include visiting Winston Churchill's statue in the village of Westerham, Winchester and Salisbury Cathedrals, Shakespeare's birthplace, Wordsworth's grave, Gretna Green, Edinburgh Castle, Hadrian's Wall, York Min-ster and the grand gardens of Warwick Castle. Travellers will spend two nights in each place visited, staying in centrally-located first class and deluxe hotels. The 11-day tour is priced from $3,099 per person, twin share, land only, and a maximum of 40 passengers will be allowed to join the luxury coach tour. Details: Visit AAP Ç ÅëëçíéêÞ ïñåõôéêþ Ó ïëþ ÓÏ- ÖÉÁÓ ÂÅÍÔÏÕÑÇ ãéïñôüæåé ôçí 10ç åðýôåéï ôùí ãåíåèëßùí ôçò ìå ìéá ìåãüëç ìïõóéêï ïñåõôéêþ ðáñüóôáóç óôï Enmore Theatre, ôçí ÊõñéáêÞ 19 Íïåìâñßïõ 2006 (6.30 ì.ì.). ÅëÜôå íá áðïëáýóåôå 200 ïñåõôýò áðü çëéêßá 3 ìý ñé 80 åôþí. Óôá ìðïõæïýêéá, ïé ÔÝëçò, ÈáíÜóçò êáé ÓôáìÜôçò, åíþ óôï ôñáãïýäé èá åßíáé ç Ìáñßóóá, ç ÌÜãäá, ç ÐÝííõ êáé ï ÃéÜííçò. Óôï ôïõìðåñëýêé êáé êïíãêï íôñáìò ï Íßêïò êáé ï ñþóôïò. ÐïëëÝò åêðëþîåéò ãéá ìéá âñáäéü ôýëåéá. ÅéóéôÞñéá: Enmore Theatre, ôçë. (02) Þ Ticketek

17 OCTOBER 2006 The Greek Australian VEMA TO BHMA 19/37 The institution of the Synod has been abolished from within, the opinions of the Hierarchy are being undermined, declares Archbishop Stylianos of Australia, one of the leading Professors of Systematic Theology worldwide, in his interview with Vema. Archbishop Stylianos who received the visit of Mr Kassimis, the Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs, did not hesitate to take issue with Archbishop Christodoulos for his stance against the Ecumenical Patriarchate, which he characterises as blasphemous, while he declares that the Interview by Maria Antoniadou ethos of Chrysopigi is without ethos and is malicious. Furthermore, he points out that the Fanar is in danger from within and criticises Metropolitan John of Pergamon, Professor of Theology and President of the Commission of Orthodox in the Dialogue with the Roman Catholic Church, for his stance, vis-à-vis Uniatism and asks if he is addressing people without Archbishop Stylianos of Australia brains. Nevertheless, the Hierarch who was a student in Germany of today s Pope Benedict XVI, declares that he has been discouraged by his stance on the churches progress towards unity, even though at the same time, the Pontiff during his visit to his personal homeland, Bavaria, only yesterday declared that he learnt and came to love Orthodoxy from two young Archimandrites, Stylianos Harkianakis and Damaskinos Papandreou, who later became Metropolitans. Mitsotakis and Simitis Victims of Chrysopigi - What, according to your assessment is the greatest problem which Orthodoxy is now facing? The one and primary problem which becomes the source of all other evils is that, even though we consider ourselves the Church par excellence of the Synods at a time when neither Papism can boast that it has a Synod, nor of course can any form of Protestantism this most sacred institution has been abolished from within. That is to say, it is convoked, but it doesn t function. And why doesn t it function? Because it is predisposed; decisions have been taken beforehand, irrespective of whether it is a Patriarchal or Archdiocesan Synod. The institution of the Synod has to be restored, and the opinions and votes of those who still have the courage to vote and have an opinion must not be underhandedly pilfered. Because, unfortunately, wherever you look in Orthodoxy today, the institution of the Synod is not functioning properly so as not to say something more serious. And certainly the Presidents have the first responsibility. - For twenty years you were President of the Dialogue with the Roman Catholic Church and you know, as only few in Orthodoxy do, the new Pope. What do you believe he will give in our journey towards unity? From the moment that I came to understand that not only we Orthodox ourselves were not united, but that we were not even convinced of the responsibility that we had assumed in the face of the entire world - which sees that after approximately one thousand years of schism, we sit at the negotiating table and say that we are in a Dialogue of Love and Truth I had many reservations as to the possibilities for the reunification of the two Churches. Certainly, I have to say, to the credit of our interlocutors in the Dialogue, that the Roman Catholics were qualitatively higher in their presentations and more honest in their collaboration with us. Unfortunately it was not possible for the Vatican Authorities - this is how they are referred to, they do not say the Pope or the Curia, but we know very well who is behind it all - to accept the censure of the ecclesial reality based on the known principles of the first Christian millennium. The first Christian millennium, which today s Pope had raised as a slogan, as a banner for the reunification of the two Churches, during the time that he had taught as Professor Ratzinger the most popular, likeable and capable of all teachers that I came to know in the West, whom I loved and respected accordingly unfortunately, I say, even though he had the first Christian millennium as the sole basis for unity, as soon as he became Pope, it seems that he forgot all these things. I especially was not only simply surprised, but astonished. However, it was the Church of Greece which undermined the Dialogue, and especially Archbishop Christodoulos in a systematic way, from the time of Seraphim (the former Archbishop of Greece). Seraphim did not understand such matters. They were however all selling love towards their Nation, and declaring that, we will not become slaves of the Papists and the Latins. This was the language of Christodoulos, who systematically undermined the Dialogue through Professor Farantos and the Metropolitan of Peristeris along with certain others. And of course there were the double-dealings of Moscow. Moscow was always playing both fields, on and off, with parallel contacts and parallel dialogues with Rome. Consequently, I have become disheartened. I also have no hope with the new President, without having any reason whatsoever for any personal contention. Certainly the tactics of the Metropolitan of Pergamon (John Zizioulas) infuriate me when he dares to say that he is a systematic theologian and argues at the same time that Uniatism does not belong on the agenda of the Dialogue. Uniatism is fraudulent, a clear deception, a people s masquerade. And the Metropolitan of Pergamon comes and says, that the local Churches should deal with such practical problems. Where did the Metropolitan of Pergamon find such solutions? And to whom is he saying such things, to illiterate people or to those without a brain? - Many times you have exercised criticism of the Church of Greece and Archbishop Christodoulos. What is it that concerns you with the Church of Greece? What has invariably concerned me is the Archbishop Stylianos with Mr. Th. Kassimis during his recent visit to Australia ethos of Chrysopygi which is without ethos and is malicious. It has been shown that the three of them have no relationship whatsoever with Christian ethics. I say this and declare it officially. I have also written it with my own signature. I do not gossip. Both Kallinikos (former bishop of Piraeus) and Ambrosios and above all Christodoulos who as I have said is the person who is inconsequent in all matters. He has never said something consistent with former things. I did not have to wait for them to publish the book, The Curse of God to see who Christodoulos was. I had already discovered it from Volos. But unfortunately, people, who today criticise him, were all flattering him back then. Among those was also Patriarch Bartholomew and Metropolitan Joachim of Chalcedon, who were his friends, and had put their hope in him, thinking that the Archbishop of Australia was harsh and strict. It has been shown that I was the most objective. I do not say correct, nor do I say intelligent, but I was the one who was judging more freely. And a free person is one who is selfless. When you have ambitions or act out of expediency, in whatever form, you are bound to say whatever needs to be said, and not what you see. This is who Christodoulos is. The most dangerous thing that he is doing today is his systematic undermining of the institution of the Ecumenical Patriarchate. We will never forgive him for this, those of us who are Greek and Orthodox. And I am no nationalist, anything but that. Patriarch Bartholomew and many others know my thoughts on this. However I will never forgive him, and I have officially written this to Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Mesinia who was the chief bravado against the Patriarchate, and I told them that no honourable Greek would ever forgive this mania, this naturalism to persist in saying that Bartholomew is an organ of the Turks. It is the greatest blasphemy against the Ecumenical Throne. Because we may disagree on countless matters with Patriarch Bartholomew, but we are not able to deny this: he strives as much as possible for the peace of the two peoples. And the former Prime Minister, Mr Mitsotakis whom I respect for other reasons, and Mr Simitis and many others have fallen victims to this fictional tale of Chrysopigi, namely that national soil is allegedly in danger if we return the New Lands (Nees Chores) to the Patriarchate or if they commemorate the Patriarch. What are these things that they are saying? Aren t they afraid of God? The military coup actions of Farmakides, which were accepted out of necessity later, and indeed as Autocephalous, giving to all others the worst example, to come out today and to say that they are protectors of Hellenism and Greek soil? To whom are they saying these things? To those without a brain? Do our politicians who support them believe these things? They do not. But they support them because they want votes. It is for this reason that I tell you that, free is the one who is selfless. I will speak out and write on these matters until I die. - You said that you disagree on countless matters with Patriarch Bartholomew. Can you tell me what these are? I will not refer even to one such matter here. He himself knows them, I have presented them with my signature. When he announced to me that the Synod in the Fanar had elected me unanimously to be a member, I said: There is no sense for me to come, because I would not travel without purpose. I am now old, I am 70 years of age, soon I will be 71. And for me to travel overseas, there would have to be a serious reason to do so. I would have gone to the Synod if it were genuinely a Synod, as the Canons would foresee. Not a Synod made up of transit bishops. Because there is hardly any time even to say, good morning. For this reason, I find myself in permanent arguments with friends, who unfortunately did not withstand the temptation to be made Synodical bishops. But for what reason would I want to be called a Synodical bishop without having a substantial vote? Not to have the possibility for genuine censure, which helps all of us to support the Ecumenical Throne. The Ecumenical Throne is in danger from the inside. I have emphasised this to the Patriarch in writing many times. When the book, Texts of Grief is published, then many will learn that Stylianos did not have any personal aspirations. ÔÏ ÂÇÌÁ (23/9/2006) (Translated by Philip Kariatlis)

18 Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia ST ANDREW S GREEK ORTHODOX THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE Announcement of Forthcoming Intensive Courses St Andrew s Greek Orthodox Theological College is pleased to announce the continuation of its successful and highly informative intensive courses during January and July. These five-day intensives commenced in January 2004 as part of the establishment of fully accredited graduate level programs: Graduate Certificate of Theological Studies, Graduate Diploma of Arts and the Master of Arts. The schedule for 2007 will be: Exploring the Patristic Mind I (8-12 January 2007) This course engages the thought and methodology of early Church Fathers and investigates the major issues in Christian theology up to the fourth century. It assists students to appreciate the preeminent position of Patristic thought for the Eastern Orthodox tradition and its articulation of dogmatic theology. Christian Initiation and the Divine Liturgy (15-19 January 2007) This course traces the origins and development of rites of Christian initiation (Baptism, Chrismation, Eucharist) and of the Divine Liturgy, with particular reference to the fourth century Church, and analyses the theology of the mysteries. It provides a solid foundation for the further study of liturgics. Early Christianity (2-6 July 2007 TBC by Jan 2007) This course is a basic introduction to the historical, cultural and theological setting of early Christianity and its development from the first century through to the end of the fourth century. Exploring the Patristic Mind II (9-13 July 2007 TBC by Jan 2007) This course deepens the student s acquaintance with Patristic thought by focusing on the Christological debates that took place in the East during the fifth to seventh centuries, as well as the iconoclastic debates of the eighth and ninth centuries, and through to later Byzantine Fathers. The courses are conducted on campus at Redfern NSW and are open to men and women, Orthodox and non-orthodox alike. They may be credited towards a degree (admissions criteria apply) or undertaken by university students as electives towards their own awards (e.g. Bachelor of Arts). They are also open to auditors. Applications for January 2007 should be lodged by Friday 8 December For more information about theological education at St Andrew s please contact the Registrar on (02) / or. Strive For Excellence St. Euphemia College High School New Technological Advancements In keeping with St. Euphemia College High School commitment to excellence in education, the High School is currently upgrading its Computer Laboratory. The upgrade, consisting of 20 new computers, a new network server with access for staff, will be a fantastic new addition to the school s existing computing network. Make sure you visit our new website at Within a dynamic Orthodox, Christian framework, a student may strive to achieve academic excellence, a yearning for learning and social responsibility. Information available from: The High School Secretary St. Euphemia College High School, 202 Stacey Street, Bankstown NSW 2200 Telephone: Web:

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