SECTION 1: COURSE OVERVIEW Regent University School of Communication and the Arts

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1 Mission Statement: Regent University serves as a center of Christian thought and action to provide excellent education through a Biblical perspective and global context equipping Christian leaders to change the world. SECTION 1: COURSE OVERVIEW Regent University School of Communication and the Arts CTV604 Redemptive Cinema - 3 hours First Spring Semester, January 10 to February 28th, 2017 (8 weeks) Location: Distance Instructor: Andrew Quicke Location: Distance To Phone in Office hours: Mondays, Wednesdays 9.55am to 11.55am plus by appointment. Phone: Fax: Communications Policy Response time for s is minimum usually 24 hours, max 48 hours. but not on Sundays. Preferred method of contact is . Course Description CTV 604 Redemptive Cinema (3): Historical/critical investigation of the production of religious films both for specialized evangelistic and didactic purposes, as well as the religious dimensions of the secular film industry. Program Outcomes MA in Cinema-Television, Concentrations in Production and Producing 1. The student will be able to integrate their Christian faith into their professional-quality media work. 2. Students will be able to evaluate film and television theories and aesthetics 3. Students will be able to conceptualize and produce scripts for short format productions. 4. Students will be able to analyze film and television through a historical-critical lens and a Christian worldview. 5. Students will demonstrate the ability to apply production techniques to the process of creating film, television, and web projects. 1 P a g e

2 6. Students will be able to integrate appropriate personnel roles within the creation of various media forms. MFA in Cinema-Television, Concentrations in Producing and Directing 1. The student will be able to integrate their Christian faith into their professional-quality media work. 2. Students will be able to evaluate film and television theories and aesthetics. 3. Students will be able to produce quality projects from conception to delivery in a breadth of contemporary media formats. 4. Students will be able to analyze film and television through a historical-critical lens and a Christian worldview. 5. Students will demonstrate the ability to apply research skills to the process of creating media projects. 6. Students will be able to integrate appropriate personnel roles within the creation of various media forms. 7. Students will be able to evaluate the major components of production. 8. Students will create a professional body of work competitive with the marketplace that includes interaction with professionals in the field. MFA in Film & Television, Concentration in Script and Screenwriting Graduate students who integrate their Christian faith into their professional quality media work. Incorporate applied film and television theories and aesthetics into multiple categories of scripts. Produce quality projects from conception to script in a breadth of contemporary formats. Apply research skills to the process of creating media projects. Professionally pitch and present work in a manner that demonstrates a clear understanding of the business side of script and screenwriting. Create a professional body of work competitive with the marketplace that includes interaction with professionals in the field. MA in Film & Television, Concentration in Scriptwriting 1. Graduate students who integrate and apply the Christian faith and Biblical truth and principles to the study and practices of mediated communication. 2. Articulate the process and elements needed for the various aspects of writing for media, which includes development, research, scriptwriting, character development, scene analysis, and storyline development. 3. Incorporate applied film and television theories and aesthetics into scripts. 4. Explain current business practices in script and screenwriting, including model professional pitching techniques. Relationship of course to Regent s Mission Mission: Regent University serves as a center of Christian thought and action to provide excellent education through a Biblical perspective and global context equipping Christian leaders to change the world. 2 P a g e

3 1. Biblical Perspective: In this course, we will study film and television from a Biblical perspective, understanding it as a meaningful expression of human experience, as a means of pursuing God s truth, and as an act of love and community. The readings and assignments focus on cultivating your understanding of the art of film and television what it means to communicate with others through film and television in the written word and thus engage more deeply what it means to be human. In our class dialogue, we will apply Biblical truth to the issues in film and television that are addressed in the course. The writing assignments allow you to develop your skills in film and television criticism, thus practicing the Biblical call to love others (even through the act of creating film and television product brilliantly) and to live in community (even when the community is cultivated through film and television texts). 2. Global Context: In this course, we will study film and television as an expression of the human condition, a method of communicating human experience that crosses the boundaries of time and place. In seeking to understand and appreciate film and television communication by ourselves and others, we will cultivate love and empathy, both of which are essential to interacting in a global context. SECTION 2: COURSE REQUIREMENTS Course Learning Outcomes (with match to Program Outcomes) Upon completion of this course, students should be able to: 1. Discuss the nature, history and scope of religious films and explain the functions they perform for diverse audiences and consumers. CLO1 2. Recognize and analyze religious symbols, images, myths, themes and codes as they appear and function in film. CLO2 3. Distinguish various perspectives on religion in film and video, and discuss the dialectics of Christian faith in cinematic, televisual and internet culture and storytelling. CLO3 4. Demonstrate an understanding of cultural variables (class, gender and race) as they play in recreating religious faith in their own images. CLO4 5. Think critically about the relationship of personal faith to the cinema, and articulate a Christian posture and vision about the phenomenon of film and television. CLO5 Course Objectives (specific tasks/assignments with match to CLOs) Course Learning Outcomes Assignments CLO1 CLO2 CLO3 CLO4 CLO5 Assignment 1 first film critique for your group x x X Assignment 2 second film critique for your group x x Assignment 3 third film critique for your group x x Assignment 6 half term paper/illustrated Powerpoint x x x Assignment 7 final paper/illustrated Powerpoint x x x 3 P a g e

4 How Faith and learning will be integrated in the course. This course will cultivate habits of thought and expression, both written and oral, in-class and online, regarding movies and television programs and their impact upon our Christian faith, worship and action. The course will help students to formulate strategies of infiltration, influence and redemption within the film and television community with people of Christian faith, and with those who lack faith. Course Procedures Attendance attendance at all classes and active participation is required in order to complete this course. For a sixteen week course students must attend at least ten classes, or for distance students signal their attendance by twice weekly s. Note: international students should consult the Office of International Student Services before registering for a Distance or Modular course. Blackboard Requirements Daily access to the Internet and Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc.) version 2007 or later The latest version of a web browser compatible with Blackboard and media players. For assistance, visit the links provided in the Helpful Resources section of the course on Blackboard or contact IT helpdesk via their website, phone or at Additional materials (PowerPoint files, quizzes, media and the like) will be provided via Blackboard (see use of Blackboard below for more information.) Understand and adhere to the Regent Honor Code found in the Student Handbook. A persistent link can also be found on Blackboard s RU Resources tab. Late Assignments will lose one grading point per day late. Assignments more than one week late will not be graded. NOTE: Technical difficulties when submitting to Blackboard will not be accepted unless documented by the IT Helpdesk. The IT Helpdesk is your first point of contact for problems with Blackboard. Deadline extensions will be allowed only when a system issue occurring on Blackboard s side is documented by Regent University IT department. Class participation regular participation in classroom and Blackboard discussions required each week. Required Materials: Baugh, Lloyd: Imaging the Divine; Jesus and Christ figures in Film; Kansas City: Sheed & Ward ISBN Lindvall, Terry & Andrew Quicke: Celluloid Sermons: the Emergence of the Christian Film Industry New York: New York University Press ISBN: Lyden, John (ed): The Routledge Companion to Religion and Film. New York: Routledge Quicke, Andrew & Mark Keuthan: Cinematic Salvation: Christian and Religious Films First Draft, copyright asserted Available on Course resources section of Blackboard Supplemental Materials: Fraser, Peter: Images of the Passion; the Sacramental Mode in Film. Westport CT: Praeger 1998 Jewett, Robert: St.Paul Returns to the Movies; Triumph over Shame Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans publishing. Lindvall, Terry: Sanctuary Cinema: Origins of the Christian Film Industry. New York: New York University Press, P a g e

5 Method of Evaluating Student Performance Assignments Points Weight Assignment 1 Film critique one % Assignment 2 Film critique two % Assignment 3 Film critique three % Assignment 4 Mid-term Nature of Jesus Films paper or PowerPoint % presentation Assignment 5 Final paper or PPT or Christian film research % Participation 100 5% TOTAL % Grading Scale The following grading scale will be used: Grade Percentage Score Quality Points A A B B B C C C fail D fail D fail D fail F fail 5 P a g e

6 Course Schedule Week Readings/Resources Used Activities/Assignments Due Dates 1. Jan Jan The Jesus Film Tradition Lyden 1-81, ; Baugh 1-94, Lindvall & Quicke Alternative Views of Incarnation Lyden ; Baugh , Lindvall & Quicke View. The Gospel According to St.Matthew d. Pasolini 1964 The Passion of the Christ (2004) R Jesus of Montreal (1989); Submit selfportrait to Blackboard Friday 13 Jan 11.59pm 1st critique due Monday Jan Jan 30-Feb 5 Churches making films : Evangelical and African American Lyden : Lindvall & Quicke Christian Fantasy: The Narnia Stories: The Lord of the Rings Lyden ; Quicke & Keuthan chapters 1&2. Diary of a Mad Black Woman Courageous The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe; The Return 0f the King. 2nd critique due Monday pm Midterm exam due Monday February 6 at 0800 am, 5. Feb Feb Feb Feb 27- March 4 Danish & Russian Christianity Quicke & Keuthan chapters 3-4 Protestant Christian films Quicke & Keuthan chapters 5-6 Music and Meaning Lyden ; Quicke & Keuthan 7-8 Catholic Christian Films Quicke & Keuthan 9-10 Ordet (the Word) Dreyer 1955 Andrei Rublev Tarkovsky 1966 God s Not Dead (2014) Heaven is for Real (2014) Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) Les Miserables (2012) Tree of Life (2011) 3rd critique due Monday am Week to Prepare final paper Final paper /PPT due Monday 27 th 0800am. Summary; the future for Redemptive films Description of Assignments Nature of Jesus Films paper: Discuss the nature of Jesus films and whether we need a new Jesus film for the 21 st Century. The paper must be 7 pages long, MLA style, double spaced with running head. Due Monday 6 February. Three critiques of designated movies posted to Blackboard discussion: Each critique MUST quote at least 3 scholarly sources. Respond to at least 2 posted critiques in the Blackboard discussion: Responses must be scholarly and of substance. Final Paper: 10 to 15 pages (no longer) discuss the History of Protestant Film from 1940 to 2015 truth. Quote from Lindvall & Quicke, & Quicke & Keuthan about films which led the way. and quote at least 10 references 6 P a g e

7 ALTERNATIVES for Final Paper: 1. Provide a 40 slide Powerpoint (or Prezzi) presentation with embedded film clips on the same subject and complete list of academic references (minimum 10). OR 2. Research paper: Original Research into Current Christian Film Companies. The joy of graduate school is that you now can become genuine scholars conducting original research for publication. For a strictly limited number of students in this class, I am offering a chance to try your hand at original research into the work of contemporary Christian film and video companies. The work you do will provide material for a new book to be published by New York University Press in In the past, I offered this opportunity to members of the CTV604 Redemptive Film Class, and those who took part greatly enjoyed and profited from the experience and all earned good grades. This alternative is only for those who are highly motivated to use internet and print resources for research in a new area; the work required must be submitted in note form, fully referenced in MLA format. The instructor will assign specific research topics for each individual student. Submission of Assignments Unless otherwise instructed, all assignments for this course must be submitted via the Assignment link found on Blackboard. All files should be submitted using the following naming convention: YourName_Assignmentname_ (e.g. John Smith_Essay 1) Papers should be in MS word format (.docx) compliant with MLA writing style guide; Scripts should be in Final Draft software format. No assignment will be accepted if submitted in any other way that Blackboard. Assignments are due no later than 6am on Mondays. It is recommended that students give themselves a buffer of time before the deadline to allow for trouble-shooting should your upload attempt fail. Students should check the assignment submission page to verify that the submission was successful. 7 P a g e

8 Assessment Rubric for Film and Video Research Essays These may be text only, or text on Powerpoints, or Prezzi, with film clips as examples. Always use MLA. A. Thesis: The student s essay includes a focused, polished thesis and develops a unified, convincing, logical argument about a literary text B. Analysis and Textual Support: The student demonstrates effective skills in analyzing film texts and uses well-chosen, persuasive, and thorough film textual (print or movie) support. This support should include identifying a primary theme of a film text, discussing at least one filmic element (including characterization, symbolism, setting, plot, color & mood, camera, audio & editing qualities), and placing a film text into some type of larger, societal context. C. Reading Comprehension: The student demonstrates familiarity with the vocabulary, sentence structure, and stylistic features of a film text and can effectively discuss them in writing. The student demonstrates knowledge of plot details and/or textual details, and the student articulates an understanding of the meaning of the film text. D. Evidence of Sound Research: The student demonstrates evidence of sound library research, making use of at least ten academic sources. The sources included are those retrieved by good research strategies, including use of the MLA International Bibliography and ILL. These sources are not limited by type, date, or scope. E. Integration of Research and MLA style: The student displays an understanding of the purpose and value of research by using secondary sources to place the essay s argument in the context of a larger academic discourse. The student effectively integrates the outside sources into the essay, using signal phrases, summaries, paraphrases, quotations, and MLA documentation correctly and effectively. F. Style/Mechanics: The student s essay contains several different types of sentences and uses polished, effective language. The tone and vocabulary are appropriate for the audience, topic, and purpose. The essay conveys an effective, distinct author s voice. The essay is free of errors in the convention of the English language. 5 (advanced) 4 3 (average) 2 1 (deficient) 8 P a g e

9 Assessment Rubric for Film Critiques and Analyses Limited to 1000 words using MLA format. Thesis: The student s critique includes a focused, polished thesis and develops a unified, convincing, logical argument about a film text. Critiques should not be written as personal opinions, but as third person analyses with at least 3 academic sources. 5 (advanced) 4 3 (average) 2 1 (deficient) Analysis and Textual Support: The student demonstrates effective skills in analyzing film texts and uses well-chosen, persuasive, and thorough textual (& even film clip) support. This support may include identifying a primary theme of a film text, discussing at least one filmic element (including characterization, symbolism, setting, plot, tone, use of camera, audio & audio post, lighting and editing conventions), and placing a literary text into some type of larger, societal context. Reading Comprehension: The student demonstrates familiarity with the visual vocabulary, plot structure, and stylistic features of a film text and can effectively discuss them in writing. The student demonstrates knowledge of plot details and/or film textual details, and the student articulates an understanding of the meaning of the film text. Use of MLA format and style: The student effectively integrates the primary film text source into the essay, using signal phrases, summaries, paraphrases, quotations, and MLA documentation correctly and effectively. The student formats the essay according to MLA style. Style/Mechanics: The student s essay contains several different types of sentences and uses polished, effective language. The tone and vocabulary are appropriate for the audience, topic, and purpose. The essay conveys an effective, distinct author s voice. The essay is free of errors in the convention of the English language. 9 P a g e

10 SECTION 3: POLICIES & PROCEDURES This section covers policies related to academic integrity, accommodations, and University policies and procedures. Christian Foundations of Academic Integrity Biblical. Regent University affirms the Biblical commandment of thou shalt not steal (Ex. 20:15). In the context of academic integrity, this must be understood in the larger framework of love thy neighbor as thyself (Matt. 22:39) as well as render therefore unto Caesar what are Caesar s; and unto God what are God s (Matt. 22:21). Paul writes from this framework of love and respect when he says, Pay to all what is owed them: taxes to whom taxes are owed, revenue to whom revenue is owed, respect to whom respect is owed, honor to whom honor is owed (Rom. 13:7). Each of these passages conveys the social obligation to respect the dignity of both the personhood and the property of those in society. Paul thus prescribes the biblical standard of honest, hard work as a key to respecting each other s personhood and property. In his letter to the Ephesians, Paul even provides counsel to those who have committed theft, stating, Let him labor, doing honest work with his own hands, so that he may have something to share with anyone in need (4:28). As such, the God of the Bible mandates a higher life than the world requires, a life in which Christians participate in the love and dignity God holds for himself as Father, Son, and Spirit. Indeed, even as Christ honors and acknowledges the will of his Father and the works of his Spirit, so should Christians honor and acknowledge the wills and works of those that provide opportunities to edify their minds and hearts with the knowledge and wisdom of sound scholarship. In doing so, Christians follow the biblical precept of integrity that is founded on love and respect and enables them to learn both from one another and those outside the faith. Philosophical. Regent University also affirms the necessity of recognizing the classical virtues when deriving a foundation for academic integrity, particularly the virtue of diligence. The virtues dictate that researchers should consider morality first. In other words, one s sense of expediency must always follow from that which is right, not from that which is convenient. Cicero comments that, in order to act morally, individuals must act in a manner that prevents themselves from being placed in a position where they must choose between convenience and morality, or, stated differently, into a position where they consider one thing to be right but not expedient, and another to be expedient but not right (102). The virtues, therefore, require diligence in order to act morally upright diligence to plan ahead, diligence to rationally consider the context of the moral situation, and diligence to act biblically not just ethically. For that which is ethical to the world is never necessarily moral before Christ. (Cicero, Marcus Tullius. On Moral Obligations. Trans. John Higginbotham. London: Faber and Faber LTD, Print.) Legal. Finally, Regent University affirms the necessity of equipping students for the reality of functioning within a society bound by laws, including copyright laws. Paul speaks clearly about a Christian s responsibility to abide by the laws of the land. He concludes that authority is ultimately from God, so believers must work within that God-ordained system (Rom. 13). Thus, in mastering the art and science of proper attribution of sources, students are participating in the Biblical tradition of exhibiting reverence for the divine institute of law as well as giving honor where honor is due. Accommodations for Students with Disabilities The policy and intent of Regent University is to fully and completely comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act of 2008, to the extent that they apply to the university. Regent University will not discriminate against an otherwise qualified student with a disability in the admissions process, or any academic activity or program, including student-oriented services. Regent University will provide reasonable accommodation to the known physical and mental limitations 10 P a g e

11 of a qualified individual with a disability, unless to do so would impose an undue hardship on the operation of the university, or unless it would fundamentally alter a degree or course requirement. Qualified students must request reasonable accommodations for disabilities through the Disability Services Coordinator in Student Services. For information about student records, privacy, and other University policies and procedures, students are directed to the most recent version of the Student Handbook located at End. 11 P a g e