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1 The Gristle, p.06 * Film Shorts, p.23 * CiderHead Project, p.30 c a s c a d i a REPORTING FROM THE HEART OF CASCADIA WHATCOM * SKAGIT * ISSUE:31 V.11 ISLAND COUNTIES BIRTHDAY BLOWOUT Whatcom Museum celebrates 75 years P.16 COMCAST OVERCAST Trouble on the line, P.08 + HOT SUMMER NIGHTS Ice show cool-down, P.15 C Subdued STRINGBAND JAMBOREE A DOWN-HOME GOOD TIME P.18 C

2 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 2 Pacific Northwest favorite and National Book Award-winner Sherman Alexie will present his first children s book at a Booked at the Baker event Fri., Aug. 5 at the Mount Baker Theatre WEDNESDAY [ ] MUSIC Final Downtown Sounds: 6pm, Bay Street FOOD Wednesday Market: 12-5pm, Fairhaven Village Green Brewers Cruise: 6:30pm, Bellingham Cruise Terminal THURSDAY [ ] ONSTAGE Cymbeline: 7pm, Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater The Shoe Play: 7:30pm, 12th Street Shoes That s Not My Department: 7:30pm, Anacortes Community Theatre Good, Bad, Ugly: 8pm, Upfront Theatre The Project: 10pm, Upfront Theatre MUSIC Jasmine Greene: 5-9pm, Hotel Bellwether bandzandt: 6-8pm, Elizabeth Park Bobby Holland: 6-8pm, Riverwalk Plaza, Mount Vernon Marrowstone Faculty: 7:30pm, Performing Arts Center, WWU GET OUT Antique Tractor Show: 7am-7pm, Berthusen Park, Lynden VISUAL ARTS First Thursday Art Walk: 5-8pm, downtown Mount Vernon New Exhibit Reception: 6-8pm, Jansen Art Center, Lynden c a s c a d i a See images focused on ways to ambulate at an opening reception for Getting There Fri., Aug. 5 at Fourth Corner Frames & Gallery during the downtown Bellingham Art Walk FRIDAY [ ] ONSTAGE The Merchant of Vegas: 7pm, Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater The Shoe Play: 7:30pm, 12th Street Shoes That s Not My Department: 7:30pm, Anacortes Community Theatre Doubles: 9pm, Upfront Theatre DANCE Hot August Nights Ice Show: 6pm, Bellingham Sportsplex Swing Dance: 6pm, BAAY Theatre Dancing on the Green: 7-9:30pm, Fairhaven Village Green ThisWeek A glance at this week s happenings MUSIC Farm Tunes: 6-9pm, BelleWood Acres FILM Little Miss Sunshine: Dusk, Bellingham Parkade Rooftop WORDS Sherman Alexie: 7pm, Mount Baker Theatre GET OUT Antique Tractor Show: 7am-7pm, Berthusen Park, Lynden History Walk-About: 2pm, Maritime Heritage Park Sin & Gin Tour: 7pm, historic Fairhaven COKUNTY CLASSICS, BY RON PATTERN FOOD Ferndale Farmers Market: 1-6pm, Cherry Street Salmon Dinner Sail: 6pm, Bellingham Cruise Terminal VISUAL ARTS Anacortes Arts Festival: 10am-7pm, throughout Anacortes Art Walk: 6-10pm, downtown Bellingham SATURDAY [ ] ONSTAGE The Princess and the Pea: 3pm and 7pm, Mount Baker Theatre Cymbeline: 7pm, Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater The Shoe Play: 7:30pm, 12th Street Shoes That s Not My Department: 7:30pm, Anacortes Community Theatre Doubles: 9pm, Upfront Theatre DANCE Hot August Nights Ice Show: 6pm, Bellingham Sportsplex MUSIC Marrowstone Chamber Orchestra: 7:30pm, Performing Arts Center, WWU The Katie Gray: 7:30pm, Tillie Lace Gallery Seabreeze Jazz Band: 7:30pm, Jansen Art Center, Lynden FILM The Martian: Dusk, Fairhaven Village Green COMMUNITY Kids Fest: 11am-3pm, Civic Field Stadium GET OUT Antique Tractor Show: 7am-5pm, Berthusen Park, Lynden Miles for Memories: 8am-12pm, Fairhaven Village Green Run4Life: 10am, Beach Store Cafe, Lummi Island Drayton Harbor Days: 10am-5pm, Blaine Marina Sin & Gin Tour: 7pm, downtown Bellingham FOOD Anacortes Farmers Market: 9am-2pm, Depot Arts Center Mount Vernon Market: 9am-2pm, Riverfront Plaza Bellingham Farmers Market: 10am-3pm, Depot Market Square Ferndale Uncorked: 4-7pm, Christ Lutheran Church Northwest Wine Festival: 7-10pm, Four Points by Sheraton VISUAL ARTS Plein Air Paint Out: 9am-5pm, downtown Bellingham Anacortes Arts Festival: 10am-6pm, throughout Anacortes Birthday Celebration: 11am-5pm, Jansen Art Center, Lynden Linda Hughes Reception: 2-5pm, Good Earth Pottery SUNDAY [ ] ONSTAGE That s Not My Department: 2pm, Anacortes Community Theatre The Merchant of Vegas: 4pm, Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater MUSIC International Concert Series: 2pm, Peace Arch Park, Blaine GET OUT Drayton Harbor Days: 10am-5pm, Blaine Marina VISUAL ARTS Anacortes Arts Festival: 10am-5pm, Anacortes

3 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 3

4 ISSUE:31 V.11 Whatcom Museum celebrates 75 years P.16 A DOWN-HOME GOOD TIME CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 4 THISWEEK If you re one of the 27 percent of people who lies to your dentist about how often you floss, it might be time to stop the guilt trip. This week, the Associated Press reported the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has removed flossing as a recommended practice after questions arose about is helpfulness in studies conducted over the past decade. Despite the evidence, medical experts and the $2 billion floss industry urge people to continue the practice. VIEWS & NEWS 4: Mailbag 6: Gristle & Goodman 8: Trouble on the line 10: Last week s news 11: Police blotter, Index ARTS & LIFE 12: Nobody is somebody 14: Walk this way 15: Hot summer, cool rink 16: A diamond anniverary 18: Jamboree jubilation 20: Clubs 22: A trippy twosome 23: Film Shorts REAR END 24: Bulletin Board, Free Will 25: Wellness 26: Crossword 27: Advice Goddess 28: Comix 29: Sudoko 30: The glean scene 2016 CASCADIA WEEKLY (ISSN ) is published each Wednesday by Cascadia Newspaper Company LLC. Direct all correspondence to: Cascadia Weekly PO Box 2833 Bellingham WA Phone/Fax: Though Cascadia Weekly is distributed free, please take just one copy. Cascadia Weekly may be distributed only by authorized distributors. Any person removing papers in bulk from our distribution points risks prosecution SUBMISSIONS: Cascadia Weekly welcomes freelance submissions. Send material to either the News Editor or A&E Editor. Manuscripts will be returned if you include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. To be considered for calendar listings, notice of events must be received in writing no later than noon Wednesday the week prior to publication. Photographs should be clearly labeled and will be returned if accompanied by stamped, self-addressed envelope. LETTERS POLICY: Cascadia Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length and content. When apprised of them, we correct errors of fact promptly and courteously. In the interests of fostering dialog and a community forum, Cascadia Weekly does not publish letters that personally disparage other letter writers. Please keep your letters to fewer than 300 words. NEWSPAPER ADVISORY GROUP: Robert Hall, Seth Murphy, Michael Petryni, David Syre Contact Cascadia Weekly: Editorial Editor & Publisher: Tim Johnson ext 260 cascadiaweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Kepferle ext 204 cascadiaweekly.com Music & Film Editor: Carey Ross ext 203 cascadiaweekly.com Production Art Director: Jesse Kinsman kinsmancreative.com Graphic Artist: Roman Komarov cascadiaweekly.com Send all advertising materials to Advertising Account Executive: Scott Pelton x 202 cascadiaweekly.com Distribution Distribution Manager: Scott Pelton x 202 cascadiaweekly.com Whatcom: Erik Burge, Stephanie Simms Skagit: Linda Brown, Barb Murdoch Letters SEND LETTERS TO CASCADIAWEEKLY.COM COMCAST OVERCAST Trouble on the line, P.08 + HOT SUMMER NIGHTS Ice show cool-down, P.15 The Gristle, p.06 * Film Shorts, p.23 * CiderHead Project, p.30 c a s c a d i a REPORTING FROM THE HEART OF CASCADIA WHATCOM* SKAGIT ISLAND COUNTIES * BIRTHDAY BLOWOUT C Subdued STRINGBAND JAMBOREE P.18 C INSIDE: Photo by Ben Shaevitz PROMISES MATTER When I buy a car that is not as advertised, it s called bait-and switch. Sometimes our elected Republican officials have been bait-and-switch candidates. They should rethink their positions to bring them more into alignment with those promised conservative principals they espoused at election time. Those conservatives we have voted to public office, who are true to their conservative ideals and stated agendas, should be supported. Candidates such as our Washington State House of Representatives Luanne Van Werven and Vincent Buys are running for reelection in the 42nd district. Both have proven records of keeping their campaign promises. Both deserve our support and our votes. Susan Blondell Kaplan, Bellingham SUPPORT CLEAN AIR I don t know about everyone else, but I like breathing clean air. So do my children and six grandchildren. So I am irritated whenever I see some industrial/business smokestack belching pollution into the air. That s why I m voting this November for Initiative 732. This citizens initiative puts a revenueneutral carbon tax of $25 per ton of carbon emissions on polluting businesses. Each year after the first, this amount increases by $5. Initiative 732 needed 249,000 signatures to get on the ballot, but by last December it had gathered 360,000 the people of Washington really want this! Realizing the taxed businesses may raise their mail TOC LETTERS STAFF prices, I-732 also lowers the state sales tax by 1 percent. Plus it eliminates the B&O tax for most Washington manufacturers and grants 400,000 low-income families as much as $1,500 annually. Our neighbor to the north, British Columbia, made this nearly identical move in It doesn t appear to have hurt their economy Vancouver shopping is doing quite well. Carbon emissions in the province have dropped by 15 to 19 percent. Again, I enjoy breathing clean air, and I would like to slow down climate change as much as possible. At November s Paris Climate Conference, Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla Motors, plus many others all felt that every country in the world should have a revenue-neutral carbon tax exactly what I-732 is. So join me in voting for I-732 in November. David M. Scheer, Bellingham MEMORIES OF THE FALL Democratic Party presidential politics were as heated, and as consequential, in 1968 as in I literally came clean and hit the road for Gene McCarthy and the anti-vietnam War movement that spring. Enraged by Robert Kennedy s DEPT OF CORRECTIONS In last week s Summer Meltdown story, we referred to festival founder Josh Clauson as Meltdown s former founder, when, in fact, Clauson remains the producer of the local, independent festival. We regret the error so much so that we are giving away a pair of Meltdown weekend passes. Please see Cascadia Weekly s Facebook page for details.

5 opportunism entering the race on McCarthy s coattail and then Hubert Humphrey s nomination at the Chicago convention, I cast my first presidential vote in November for Eldridge Cleaver. Richard Nixon was elected. I m still regretful. With all well-earned respect for others who supported Bernie at a local caucus but contribute more than I do to the social democratic transformation he s mobilizing in the party, need I say more? Please, Bernie Or Bust Dems: imagine a Trump presidency, its consequences and your memories decades ahead if he s elected. Milt Krieger, Bellingham THE REVOLUTION CONTINUES Are both the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton without shame? The DNC rigs the nominating process by means of superdelegates. Then they plot and plan to discredit and malign Bernie Sanders through the media, even going so far as to question his faith and using it purposely in those states where it would cause his campaign the most damage. Hillary was then given a pass for her total disregard of clearly stated guidelines regarding the handling of classified government documents. She will no doubt also get a pass for the money she has taken from big business and foreign governments that have filled the coffers (and her pockets) of the Clinton Foundation a charitable foundation that gives less than 10 percent of its total revenue to charity. The Bern was able to give Hillary a good case of indigestion and that was fun. But Hillary is not going to cheat her way into the Oval Office or promise favors for cash from big banks and big corporations as long as the Sanders revolution is alive and well. Diana Lowry, Bellingham BURN DOWN THE HOUSE The DNC takes the grand prize for dishonest, fixed nominating procedures. True, the RNC had its own issues, but at least the RNC wound up properly nominating the aggrieved candidate. The DNC not only stole the nomination from Bernie Sanders with superdelegates, but also slandered him. This behavior is sleazy and totally appalling. The leaked s from some top DNC operatives were beyond doubt disgusting both in content and purpose. I will vote for Trump. At least he is not beholden to either the RNC or special interests. George Hesselgrave, Bellingham DON T BURN DOWN THE HOUSE Lots of my fellow politically progressives are considering voting third party this year. I would like to applaud their idealism, but correct their misguided plan. Third parties cannot win at the presidential level. They can, however, be a spoiler in a close election like this one is proving to be. The Democratic Party for all of its faults has moved toward its most progressive platform in history. We can move it even further because it is not a static entity, it is what we as active members make of it. We will lose everything if we don t elect Hillary. We chance having Trump as president if we vote for a third party. I don t want Trump to select the next Supreme Court members. I don t want a president who doesn t believe climate change is real and is a raging misogynist and xenophobe. Bernie Sanders has asked his supporters to continue the Revolution by voting Democratic and getting involved in the Party at every level. I am doing exactly that. Michael Chiavario, Bellingham A LOST ELECTION Whether you like Hillary or not, she has lost the election. Hillary supporter Michael Moore points out that Hillary s support for GAAT, NAFTA and the TPP will cost her the 64 Electoral College votes of Rust Belt states Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Michigan. Trump is hammering Hillary on these anti-worker trade deals. Without these four states she cannot win. Moore wrote this before the selection of Tim Kaine for Vice President, and the Democratic National Committee scandal. Chosing Tim Kaine as VP, a TPP supporter and front man for the bailed-out big banks only reinforces Hillary s support of Wall Street without attracting any new voters. Kaine is perceived by progressives and union members as a message their votes and support are unwelcome. Disenfranchising the 45 percent of the Democratic Party that staffs phone banks, puts up signs and drives little old ladies to the polls is never a winning strategy. This support for globalization deals that attacked the Democratic Party base cost Gore the Democratic votes, which went to Nader. Why repeat this strategy and send those working-class votes to Jill Stein or Trump? How can they shove a guaranteed losing candidate down the voter s throats when there are attractive reform candidates available? Polls show Sanders can handily beat Trump. How can they do this with the media spotlights of the whole world focused on them? Personally I have not given up on a woman President in this election. If Hillary and the Democratic Party elites love this country and the Party, Hillary Clinton will step aside, and nominate Elizabeth Warren. Elizabeth Warren has all of Hillary s pluses and none of her baggage. Bo Richardson, Bellingham kids northwest mi shoes heroine downtown emporium fringe garys mens and womens wear greenhouse SIDE WALK saturdays Come downtown during the summer and enjoy special sidewalk sales and deals! ideal wise buys Every Saturday from 7/9-8/6 See a list of all participating shops and eateries at presented by backcountry essentials ragfinery third planet sojourn CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 5

6 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 6 THE GRISTLE A RAUCOUS CAUCUS: Washington made its presence known at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia last week, with a proportionately outsized number of Berniacs causing a ruckus and challenging the status quo. When Bernie Sanders supporters walked out of the DNC nomination roll call on Tuesday in the City of Brotherly Love, members of the Washington delegation lead the charge. About three-quarters of Washington delegates came to Philadelphia pledged to Sanders, based on his big win in the state s March caucuses. Some of them spent the first couple of days in the city attending strategy sessions and rallies against Hillary Clinton. Quite a big week, and obviously a lot of people need a little more than Trump sucks as a reason to be happy about Hillary Clinton as the nominee, explained Richard May, who helped organize and lead Whatcom s Sanders delegates. A number of forces collided to produce Washington s fierce Bernie wave. The state s peculiar presidential caucus arrived in tandem with the peak acceleration of Sanders momentum last spring and, pumped with energy from the state s ample electorate, sent a surfeit of Bernie delegates from Washington to the convention as compared to other states. Washington s Bernie delegates outnumbered those of Hillary, 74 to 27, creating a nucleus of jeers and cheers of protest on the convention center floor that were markedly at odds with the larger celebrating tone of the nominating event. There was a lot of demonstration activity, May said, and some people are asking, Well, what s the point of that?, but it did have an effect of bringing good leftist change to the platform in real time, even changes in the draft text of Clinton s acceptance speech, he noted. The theory of Bernie people not being fully on board gave her the cover to be more to the left than she might have been. Washington in particular had a lot of very experienced conventioneers, May noted of the effectiveness of the delegation. I was one of about five or six people who had been to our third or more national convention; and the organizing technology through social media was incredible, he said. White rage a dissatisfaction expressed intensely by a vocal cohort is a narrative that has come to define the 2016 national election, but in Washington it takes a surprising form. The state is strongly blue, and hasn t voted for a Republican for president since 1984; and this in turn has granted safe harbor to incubate irrepressibly liberal views. The state is also blindingly white, with four residents in five claiming that ethnicity, according to Census data. Washington is no less subject to the forces widely held to be the drivers of voter dissatisfaction and anger in other parts of the country flat, stagnant wages since the 1970s; wealth accumulating disproportionately to the wealthiest of families; economic and social insecurity, and a sense the labor mobility enshrined in trade agreements may be a root cause; disgust at the paralysis of government in addressing these and other public concerns but the unusual makeup of the Washington electorate causes the dissatisfaction to take a different form. So while white rage may be driving a conservative, even fascist outlook in other parts of the country, in Washington it is the force behind the supporters of Sanders and no other, Bernie-or-Bust. BY AMY GOODMAN THE LIBERTY Bell, on permanent display at Philadelphia s Independence Mall, is known for its famous fracture. The bell was cast in London in 1751, and cracked on its first test ring. The bell was melted down and recast in Philadelphia, and rang from the Pennsylvania State House, now known as Independence Hall, for close to 100 years. A second crack formed years later, and the bell eventually was decommissioned, taking on the symbolic significance it has today, inspiring movements to abolish slavery, for women s suffrage and others. The Democratic National Convention here this week also is inspiring many, in movements for LGBTQ rights, gun control, and racial and economic justice and beyond. But as the first woman in U.S. history is nominated to be the presidential candidate of a major party, a deep split in the Democratic Party has emerged. Sen. Bernie Sanders conceded to Hillary Clinton and endorsed her candidacy, but many of his supporters have not. Hundreds of them walked out of the convention as Clinton s nomination was formalized Tuesday night. The nomination of Hillary Clinton is historic. She has a significant chance to be the first woman president of the United States. During the roll call at the DNC, the delegation from Vermont, Sanders home state, passed, and was thus called on as the last state to report, after Wyoming. The Vermont spokesperson stated the delegate votes, then Bernie Sanders, whose insurgent campaign rocked the Clinton juggernaut to its core, stood and took the microphone: Madam Chair, I move that the convention suspend the procedural VIEWS EXPRESSED ARE NOT NECESSARILY THOSE OF CASCADIA WEEKLY views YOUR VIEWS THE GRISTLE A Tale of Two Fractures THE LIBERTY BELL AND THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY rules. I move that all votes, all votes cast by delegates be reflected in the official record, and I move that Hillary Clinton be selected as the nominee of the Democratic Party of the United States. The actual delegate counts of Clinton versus Sanders were dispensed with, and Clinton was nominated by acclamation. Cheers and applause filled the Wells Fargo Center. While thousands went wild, several hundred, well, just went. Chanting Walk out, walk out and This is what democracy looks like, 300 Sanders delegates, including many from Vermont who were standing with Sanders moments before, marched out of the arena and proceeded to the media tent to demonstrate their disagreement with the process and announce the No Voice, No Unity campaign. We were never welcome here, we were never wanted here, Sanders delegate Felicia Teter told the Democracy Now! news hour as she walked out. The people s voices are not being heard, and still the people s votes are not being counted. We are going to show the Democratic Party that if they will not have us and they will not welcome us into their party, then we will leave, and they will lose to Trump. And it will not be our fault. It will be their fault, because they did not listen to the people... They simply ignored us. They shut us down. Many Sanders delegates cited issues on which they strongly differ with Hillary Clinton, from her earlier support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and not knowing where she stands on it today, to her coziness with Wall Street, to her consistent support for ever-widening wars in the Middle East. The walkout also was fueled by leaked Democratic National Committee s that were posted online by WikiLeaks just days before the convention. Some of the s proved that the DNC, and its chairperson, Congressmember Debbie Wasserman Schultz, actively worked to disparage Sanders and his campaign. The s led the headlines all weekend; by Monday, Wasserman Schultz had announced her resignation as DNC chairperson. Bernie Sanders had for months accused the Democratic National Committee of bias in favor of Clinton throughout the campaign. Now his supporters had proof, and many carried signs that read Rigged as they walked out. The Liberty Bell was decommissioned because of a barely visible hairline fracture. The famous crack in the bell was actually made on purpose, in an attempt to repair it. The Democratic Party has an enormous challenge now, to unify its members to defeat one of the most bigoted and divisive, some say fascistic, presidential candidates in modern U.S. history, Donald Trump. The party has a very deep and visible fracture. The question remains whether they can repair the crack in time to defeat Trump. Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now! Denis Moynihan contributed to this column.

7 FOOD 30 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 FUN B-BOARD 24 GO NORTHWOOD FOR CASINO! GET OUT 14 Your Favorite Friday Cash Is At Northwood! CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 $500 $5 $ 00 0e every v ry ve y mi m minutes nu n utes te fr te ffrom om 6 6pm pm m tto o1 10pm, 0pm 0pm pm m, an and 5X P and Points oiint nts s 6pm closing combo Friday from ffr om m6 pm tto cl los osing ing th tthe he pe perfect co c mbo mb o for ffo or a fun fun Fr fu rid iday ay y night! Winners Club Members get entry each week. nigh ni n gh ht!! W i ne in ers C lub lu b Me M mber mber ers ge g et a fr free ee e ent ntry nt ry e ry ach ac h we w eek ek. k DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 MORE CASH MORE OFTEN ON SATURDAYS IN AUGUST! Saturdays are super with MORE $500 cash drawings every 30 minutes from 6pm to 11pm! Winners Club Members get a free entry each week. MODERN COMFORTS AND OLD FASHIONED HOSPITALITY Northwood Road Lynden WA #31.11 The state is safe for the Democratic nominee and probably the governor s race, too and that provides safety for state voters to pursue a more radical agenda. I don t know if it is our tradition of activism, maybe it is just our second nature, that has gotten people so fired up, May speculated. Washington has been at the forefront of legalizing pot, gay marriage, increase of minimum wage we re just genetically accustomed to taking a lead on nationwide issues. Clearly, direct democracy plays a role. Three signature initiatives made it to the state ballot for November, and they are each one instructive. One seeks to impose a carbon emission tax on certain fossil fuels and fossil-fuelgenerated electricity. Another would increase the state s minimum wage to $13.50 by A third urges a federal constitutional amendment that limits constitutional rights to people, not corporations. A fourth initiative awaits certification, and this one builds on last year s successful gun registration effort and asks voters to allow courts to prohibit anyone who faces a protective order from owning a firearm. These are quite progressive initiatives strongly supporting the platform endorsed by Sanders while the state has already led the nation on issues like gun registration and the legalization of marijuana measures other states have modeled and placed on their own ballots this fall. Yet despite the passion, and the cries against rigged elections and being shut out of the process that has been the complaint of many Sanders supporters, participation in the state primary election this week has been remarkably dismal. On the eve of the primary, the Secretary of State reported a statewide ballot return of just 17.7 percent. Whatcom and Skagit fare a little better, with 21 percent of ballots returned on election eve. With 88 percent of national and state elected positions up for grabs in 2016, the passion for change should be firehosed down the ballot. The Gristle has argued that the state s 2nd Congressional District in particular might be the most liberal district in the United States the bluest shoreline in the bluest section of the bluest state on the bluest coast but you d hardly know it for our milquetoast centrist representation in the District of Columbia. If change is possible, shouldn t it be proven in these races? JUST TWO TURNS OFF THE GUIDE MERIDIAN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA N GUIDE MERIDIAN RD E BADGER RD LYNDEN NORTHWOOD RD CASCADIA WEEKLY THE GRISTLE 7

8 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 8 Other Desert Cities was produced by the Mount Baker Theatre Summer Rep in 2015 currents NEWS POLITICS FUZZ BUZZ INDEX BY TIM JOHNSON COMCAST OVERCAST WASHINGTON AG ALLEGES PATTERN OF ILLEGALLY DECEIVING CUSTOMERS WASHINGTON STATE Attorney General Bob Ferguson filed a lawsuit in King County Superior Court on Monday, alleging that internet giant Comcast has more than 1.8 million violations of the state's Consumer Protection Act. Violations include misrepresenting the company's Service Protection Plan for customers, charging customers improper service call fees, and improper credit screening practices, the office wrote in a statement. According to Ferguson's office, the company s own documents reveal a pattern of illegally deceiving their customers to pad their bottom line by tens of millions of dollars. The lawsuit is the first of its kind in the nation though the Service Protection Plan is a nationwide program and many of the improper practices are used in all of Comcast s markets, the AGO noted in a press release. The Attorney General s Office brought these issues to Comcast more than a year ago, but the company didn t begin to make changes until recently on the verge of this litigation. This case is a classic example of a big corporation deceiving its customers for financial gain, Ferguson said. I won t allow Comcast to continue to put profits above customers and the law. The lawsuit seeks refunds for about 500,000 Washingtonians who were deceived "into paying at least $73 million in subscription fees over the last five years. The Attorney General's Office claims that they brought their concerns about service issues to Comcast more than a year ago, but the corporation did not take action until they were on the verge of this litigation with the state. The AGO lawsuit accuses Comcast of misleading Washington consumers and deceiving them into paying subscription fees for a nearly worthless protection plan without disclosing its significant limitations, the state noted in a press statement. Customers who sign up for Comcast s Service Protection Plan pay a $4.99 monthly fee, ostensibly to avoid being charged if a Comcast technician visits their home to fix an issue covered by the plan. Comcast routinely claimed that the comprehensive plan covered the cost of all service calls, including those related to inside wiring, customer-owned equipment connected to Comcast services and on-site education about products, the AGO main- tains. However, Comcast did not appropriately disclose that the plan does not cover repairs to any wall-fished wiring wiring inside a wall which constitutes the vast majority of wiring inside homes. As part of the AGO investigation, customers contacted Comcast multiple times. Seventy-five percent of the time, Comcast representatives told these customers the plan covered all inside wiring. That isn t true, the AGO asserted. Customer service scripts, obtained during the investigation, direct Comcast s representatives to state that the plan covers service calls related to inside wiring or wiring inside your home. The plan does not, in fact, cover the vast majority of inside wiring. The AGO investigation uncovered that Comcast misrepresents the limitations of several other elements of the plan, including its coverage of service calls related to consumer-owned equipment and the repair of cable jumpers, connectors and splitters. While Comcast claims that these restrictions are in the plan s terms and conditions, Comcast does not provide those terms and conditions to its customers, does not require customers to This case is a classic example of a big corporation deceiving its customers" BOB FERGUSON, WASHINGTON STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL approve them nor do they tell customers that these additional terms and conditions exist. A customer must proactively search Comcast s website to find these terms and conditions. Comcast representatives told The Seattle Times that they were not aware of the lawsuit before the state's press release came out this morning. The Service Protection Plan has given those Washington consumers who chose to purchase it great value by completely covering over 99 percent of their repair calls. We worked with the Attorney General s office to address every issue they raised, and we made several improvements based on their input, Beth Hester, Comcast vice president of external affairs in Washington state, said in a statement. Given that we were committed to continue working collaboratively with the Attorney General s office, we re surprised and disappointed that they have instead chosen litigation. We stand behind our products and services and will vigorously defend ourselves.

9 REALTOR SRES (Seniors Real Estate Specialist) From listing your home, first time home buying, to looking for that final destination... I am the Realtor to assist you! Jasmine Talsma REALTOR/SRES JasmineTalsma.com All rides. * All week. August CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 9 *Except Route 80X to Mount Vernon.

10 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD TUESDAY Dairy farmers and environmentalists criticize new manure-control rules the state Dept. of Ecology plans to finalize early next year. In comments, farmers said dairies already are heavily regulated and that Ecology s new layer of mandates would be unnecessary and expensive. Environmentalists testified that the department should require dairies to line lagoons with synthetic fabric to prevent leaks and to install wells to monitor groundwater. [Associated Press] WEDNESDAY Initiative promoter Tim Eyman and his political committees should be held in contempt, and each slapped with a $2,000-a-day penalty, for failing to produce court-ordered records, the Attorney General argues. The AG is asking a Snohomish County Superior Court judge to penalize Eyman for allegedly stonewalling in a campaign finance corruption probe. A similar request was also filed in Thurston County Superior Court. [AGO] THURSDAY LAST WEEK S NEWS JULY26-AUG02 BY TIM JOHNSON as State regulators fine Volkswagen $176 million, saying the automaker put people s health at risk by releasing harmful air pollutants in its emissions-cheating scandal. The Dept. of Ecology said the company violated state clean-air laws when it installed illegal software on many of its diesel vehicles to trick emissions tests. The department reported Volkswagen vehicles emitted up to 40 times the allowable amount of harmful nitrogen oxides while being driven. The agency said it based its fine on violations per vehicle, and the penalty holds Volkswagen accountable for environmental damage from more than 21,000 vehicles registered in Washington. [Associated Press] FARM TUNES! Join us for our 2016 Summer Music Series Fridays 6-9 pm 8/5 8/12 8/19 Sandblom Lindsay Street Gentri Watson WThe Week that Serving breakfast and lunch daily! 6140 Guide Meridian - (360) FOOT STOMPING MUSIC TASTY COMFORT FOOD PATIO DINING FAMILY FUN PHOTO COURTESY MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE For decades, Japanese fishermen have told stories about the existence of a dark, rare beaked whale that they called karasu the raven. But now, scientists say they have genetic proof to back up these tales. Long mistaken for its relative, the Bairds beaked whale, scientists say it represents an entirely new species in the Western Pacific. The research was published in Marine Mammal Science. A small plane goes off the runway at Bellingham International Airport and ended up in a ditch, according to the Port of Bellingham. The single-engine Cessna was stuck in a ditch between the airport s sole runway and a taxiway. No one was injured. [KGMI] FRIDAY In today s closing arguments for the environmental review of a proposed crude oil terminal in Vancouver, the state Attorney General s Counsel for the Environment announced its opposition to the project. The Tesoro Savage Vancouver Energy Distribution Terminal is currently under review by the state s Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC), which is tasked under state law with recommending to the governor either that he approve or reject the project. The bottom line is that the potential benefits of this project are dramatically outweighed by the potential risks and costs of a spill, the AG s office said. [AGO] MONDAY A body found at Baker Lake is identified as the fisherman who went missing there earlier this month, the Whatcom County Sheriff s Office reports. Glen Richardson, 49, of Bellingham, left his campsite at the lake on July 13. Crews searched for him for the next four days using dogs and a U.S. Customs and Border Protection helicopter. On July 29, boaters called to report a body floating near the north end of the lake. Investigation confirmed Richardson s identity. Autopsy results are in. [WCSO, Bellingham Herald] Washington state regulators adopt new clean-water rules tied partly to how much fish people eat after years of heated debate over how clean the states water should be. Now it's up to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency which stepped in last fall to write its own rules for Washington to decide whether the states plan is good enough. The state's rules dramatically raise the current fish-consumption rate to 175 grams a day, which would protect people who eat about a serving of fish a day. Tribes and environmental groups have pushed for more stringent rules to reduce water pollution and protect the people who eat the most fish. [DOE, AP] TUESDAY Bellingham s feud with the Sheriff over booking restrictions at the county jail nears a crisis. The Bellingham Herald reports a man was arrested after he brandished a hatchet with a four-inch blade near Bellingham Cold Storage. Police were unable to book him into jail. He was released. The Herald reports Bellingham Police have made 343 reports related to the man and he is listed as a defendant in 246 cases in the courts of Washington state. [Bellingham Herald] Follow us on Beermenus.com Got 'Za? We do! Great 'Za and great beer too! We are so excited to be moving to State Street! Look for us there this Fall!

11 FUZZ BUZZ THESE TROUBLED TIMES On July 30, police dispatchers reported an altercation between a Trump supporter and Clinton supporters at the Old Settlers Picnic in Ferndale. Police arrived to learn an older man was loudly playing a recorded speech by Donald Trump, when he observed several people looking at him funny. An argument broke out over the volume of the speech, and one man shoved a woman and child aside to get at the elderly gent. The man was then pushed to the ground, where he suffered a head injury. Ferndale Police believe the man was suffering from a medical condition and was not motivated by politics. GRIFT KEEPS ON GIVING On July 29, the Whatcom County Sheriff s Office reported on a money collection racket. The caller is stating that they are law enforcement (sometimes using the name Captain Abernathy) and that the person they have called has a warrant out for their arrest because they failed to appear for jury duty, deputies reported. In order to take care of the warrant the victim is told that they must purchase approximately $3,500 worth of Green Dot Money Pak cards and is also instructed to call the scammer back and read them the numbers off the back of the card; this allows the scammer to access all the money on the card. The caller also states that if the victim refuses to pay, a deputy or police officer will be dispatched to arrest the person on the warrant immediately. Deputies cautioned that county warrants and collections are not handled this way. POKÉMON A-GO-GO On July 21, an amazed anonymous caller reported seeing a naked man walking in Blaine at 2:30am. The arriving officers contacted the pedestrian, who was indeed bare from the waist down, carrying a daypack, a cell phone and his private parts, police reported. He appeared to be alone but investigation revealed he had three associates a trio of characters he had just captured on his phone in the space between the two motels and the restaurant he was standing beside. He denied that his lack of clothing served any purpose save maximizing the agility needed for a satisfying hunt, but agreed to immediately don pants from his daypack rather than have his game interrupted by incarceration. HOBO HORTICULTURE On July 27, BNSF railroad employees called Bellingham Police to report a naked man alongside the tracks one mile south of Marine Park who was camping and watering plants. Officers contacted the man, who had shorts on, police reported. He explained that he goes to the point throughout the summer to clean up trash, which he places in a pile along the tracks. He also waters some small native trees he planted in the area. On July 18, a citizen reported a man yelling for help in the woods by Fairhaven Park. A Bellingham Police officer contacted the man walking out of the woods and into the park. He was homeless and just got lost in the woods, the officer reported. On July 18, a transient, recently arrived in Bellingham from Arkansas, was found sleeping in an alcove inside of the Oxford Suites hotel on Meridian Street. Employees asked him to leave and he became hostile, Bellingham Police reported. Officers located him hiding on the top floor in the stairwell access to the roof. He was escorted from the building and issued a lifetime notice of trespass from the hotel. ABTRUSE ASSAULTS On July 30, a Bellingham man apparently was shot twice in the back and wounded while drinking downtown. The Bellingham Herald reports he walked by a cab driver and asked for help, having suffered two small-caliber bullet wounds to his back. The man did not see his assailant or suggest any reason he might have been attacked. Police have no witnesses. On July 18, Bellingham Police spoke to a man in the woods near Squalicum High School who had been going to several houses in the neighborhood and complaining to residents he d been shot at. On July 24, a man reported he had no memory of leaving a bar in downtown Bellingham and later found himself unconscious in the street. He was taken to the hospital, where he filed a report of the incident. DOCUMENTING THE ATROCITIES On June 28, a man stopped by Bellingham Police headquarters to drop off a rambling statement detailing a litany of wrongs he believes he has suffered at the hands of family, friends and law enforcement, police reported. On July 1, a woman came to the Blaine Police department requesting to speak with an officer. She explained that her paranormal perceptions provide her an unusually accurate sense of people around her, and she wanted to share her impression that a man she had recently observed had possibly committed crimes against children, police reported. She did not know the person, but had written down a license plate number of the man's car and provided it to the officer for his report. 6.9 Millions of tons of manure produced annually by Washington dairies. Dairy producers typically use flush or scrape systems to collect the manure into lagoons, where it s stored until applied to fields. The manure provides nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphorus for crop production. The state Dept. of Ecology is currently rewriting its permitting rules on industrial-scale Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) and will accept public comment through Aug /40 Estimated tons of manure produced by each cow in Washington per year. index Approximate mix of methane and carbon dioxide emitted as gas by Washington cows. 37 Percent of methane emissions attributable to factory farming operations. Methane (CH 4 ) holds more than 20 times the global warming potential of CO 2. $950 Farmgate value of milk produced in Washington in 2010, in millions. Milk is Washington s second most valuable agricultural commodity (after apples), More than 690 million gallons of milk were produced at Washington dairy farms in 2010, making Washington 10th in the nation in milk production. 2 Rank of Whatcom County in dairy production, after Yakima County. Yakima County ranks eighth in the nation for milk production and Whatcom County ranks 33rd. $35 Billions in indirect grain subsidies to CAFOs between 1997 and 2005, or about $4 billon annually. Taxpayer-subsidized feed grain enabled CAFOs to grow and dominate the market. The estimated cost to clean up contaminated soil and groundwater under every U.S. hog and dairy CAFO is estimated at $4.1 billion. SOURCES: Washington State Dept. of Agriculture; Washington State Dept. of Ecology; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Union of Concerned Scientists CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 11

12 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD REVIEWED BY TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER Nobody THE SLIPPERY SLOPE OF JUSTICE words COMMUNITY LECTURES BOOKS MARC LAMONT HILL CHARGES DROPPED. You were surprised, but not surprised. Hopeful that it might be different, but only barely. These days, the idea of justice can be a slippery issue that s sometimes based on all the wrong things. In Marc Lamont Hill s new book, Nobody, you ll see how we ve come to this. On the afternoon of May 1, 2015, when Baltimore s chief prosecutor, Marilyn Mosby, said she was bringing charges on six police officers involved in the arrest and detention of Freddie Gray, her pronouncement was met with cheers. Gray s case then was the latest in a long line, nationwide, but it wouldn t be the last of its kind. Gray, says Hill, was Nobody. To be Nobody is to be vulnerable, he says in his preface. It s being poor, black, brown, immigrant, queer, or trans and living in an atmosphere that s more rather than less unsafe. Nobody is considered disposable. Take, for instance, Michael Brown. By all indications, Brown was a normal guy who acted spontaneously: he stole cigarillos from a C-store and shoved the shopkeeper, who called authorities, and the rest is history. The way it happened, though, the dehumanization, and the aftermath of Brown s random encounter with police will be talked about for generations, Hill says. How did we get here? The answer is found in crowded, ill-maintained, depressing neighborhoods where schools are subpar and few in charge care. It s in the way the justice system operates for those who are too poor to hire a lawyer or afford their bail. Also to blame: so-called quotas within police departments, a lack of differentiation between serious infraction and minor annoyance, and the relative ease of targeting minorities in all of the above. And yet, Hill says, we cannot individualize this crisis. We must fix housing, schools, the justice system and the economy overall, in all corners of the country. We must reinvest in communities. We must imagine the world that is not yet. So you brace yourself, take a deep breath, unfold the newspaper at the corner and quickly peek at the headline to see if it s about yet another shooting death of a young person. So begins your day; you should have read Nobody first. Before you do, though, let s get the elephant out of the room: Hill isn t anti-cop in this book. Instead, I saw a thoughtful, balanced, thought-provoking look at how today s authorities, police departments and government entities have evolved to be what they are, and how that can be turned around. In his examination of the past, in fact, Hill paints real solutions to the problems that put vulnerable citizens in harm s way. I also saw that those solutions don t lie 100 percent with the men and women in blue. This is not an easy book to read; it s not fun, either, and it demands you think about what s said. Still, if you only read one book with the intention of making change, then this is the one you want. Start Nobody today, and there ll be no dropping this one. WORDS WED., AUG. 3 EDGE OF THE WORLD: Eowyn Ivey (author of the bestselling novel The Snow Child) will read from her new book of fiction, To The Bright Edge of the World, at 7pm at Village Books, th St. The tome takes place in 1885, where a decorated war hero is waiting to lead a reconnaissance mission for the U.S. government up into the untamed Alaskan territory. THURS., AUG. 4 THE JOYFUL BEAR: Internationally acclaimed author and illustrator Margaret Meps Schulte shares The Joyful Bear at 7pm at Village Books, th St. The illustrated book for adults is co-authored by an enlightened teddy bear who presents life lessons with gentle humor, introducing his unique teddy-bear philosophy and explaining concepts like Being, the importance of changing your mind, and what you can do with your magic superpower. FRI., AUG. 5 LITERARY LUNCHTIME: Grownups can listen to a book excerpt, short story, or maybe a few children s favorites at today s Literary Lunchtime: Storytime Fund for Adults at 1pm at the Blaine Library, 610 3rd St. Debby Farmer and other library staff will lead the way. Entry is free. (360) SHERMAN ALEXIE AT MBT: As part of the Booked at the Baker series, Pacific Northwest favorite and National Book Awardwinner Sherman Alexie will present his first children s book, Thunder Boy Jr., at 7pm at the Mount Baker Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St. Thunder Boy Jr. is named after his dad, but he wants a name that s all his own. Just because people call his dad Big Thunder doesn t mean he wants to be Little Thunder. He wants a name that celebrates something cool he s done, like Touch the Clouds, Not Afraid of Ten Thousand Teeth, or Full of Wonder. Tickets are $5. OR WWW. VILLAGEBOOKS.COM SAT., AUG. 6 BOOK AND AUTHOR FEST: The first-ever Point Roberts Book and Author Festival will feature local author readings and presentations and the opportunity to talk with authors individually and get autographed copies of their books from 2-5pm at the Point Roberts Community Center, 1487 Gulf Rd. Entry is free. (360) OR MON., AUG. 8 BOOKS ON TAP: South Whatcom Library manager Brian Hulsey will lead a Books on Tap discussion focusing on Gabor Mate s In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts: Close Encounters with Addiction at a Books on Tap meeting from 6:30-8pm at Tino s Pizza & Pasta Co., 2275 Lake Whatcom Blvd. (360) doit POETRYNIGHT: Those looking to share their creative verse as part of Poetrynight can sign up at 7:45pm at the Bellingham Public Library, 210 Central Ave. Readings start at 8pm. Entry is by donation.

13 TUES., AUG. 9 FERNDALE BOOK GROUP: Discuss Kristin Hannah s The Nightingale at a Book Group meeting from 2:30-4:30pm at the Ferndale Library, 2125 Main St. The book tells the stories of two sisters, separated by years and experience, by ideals, passion, and circumstance, each embarking on her own dangerous path toward survival, love and freedom in German-occupied, war-torn France. (360) doit ACTIVE PEACE: Peacemaker and life coach Scott Brown shares ideas from Active Peace: A Mindful Path to a Nonviolent World at 7pm at Village Books, th St. In the book, he identifies the belief in separateness as the root cause and skillfully weaves together the essentials needed to move beyond separateness. THURS., AUG. 11 LIFE BEYOND SHAME: Connie Dawson Ph.D. shares passages and ideas from Life Beyond Shame: Rewriting the Rules at 7pm at Village Books, th St. She takes on the Old Rules, which she says cast a shadow of undeserved shame on most of us. COMMUNITY WED., AUG. 3 GREEN DRINKS: Network with likeminded environmentally aware citizens at the monthly Green Drinks from 5-7pm at Highland Hemp House, 1010 Highland Dr. In addition to sipping on Aslan brews, tour the 45-yearold home, a demo project illustrating the viability, economic sense and environmental benefit that hempcrete can and should have in the building industry. SAT., AUG. 6 TREASURE SALE: Pursue a variety of goods at a Spirit of Hope Treasure Sale from 9am- 4pm at the Church of the Assumption, 2116 Cornwall Ave. KIDS FEST: A variety of games, face painting, arts and crafts, interactive activities, food, magicians, jugglers, prizes and more will be part of the 27th annual Kids Festival happening from 11am-3pm at Civic Field Stadium, 1355 Civic Field Way. Entry is free OR LOST COMMUNITIES: Join Troy Luginbill, Director of the Lynden Pioneer Museum, as he shares photos, slides, and artifacts gleaned from 20 years of exploring this county s history at an all-ages Lost Communities of Whatcom County presentation at 7:30pm at the Lummi Island Library, 2144 S. Nugent Rd. AUG SKAGIT COUNTY FAIR: A carnival, local music, performances by magicians and more, eating contests, a kid s zone, pie eating contests, a car show, farm animals and much more will be part of the Skagit County Fair taking place from 10am-10pm Wednesday through Saturday in Mount Vernon at the Skagit County Fairgrounds, 479 W. Taylor St. Entry is $6-$8. Representing Local Artists Since 1969 August 2016 Variations on a Theme FEATURING Linda Hughes Artist s Reception August 6 TH, 2-5 PM 1000 Harris Avenue Bellingham, WA Monday - Saturday:11-6. Sunday: 12-5 (360) WINES "ON SPOUT" BEER & FOOD BEST POPCORN IN TOWN "HOURS OF HAPPINESS" DAILY 3-7 TUES-SAT OPEN AT 3 SUNDAY OPEN AT 4 CLOSED MONDAYS THROUGH AUGUST 120 WEST HOLY ST. Produced by Epic Events in conjunction with the Historic Fairhaven Association BEN KINNEY & KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY Jul 23: STAR WARS: The Force Awakens 8:00 Jul 30: LABYRINTH Aaron J. 8:00 Aug 6: THE MARTIAN Azara Tribal 7:30 FairhavenOutdoorCinema.com Aug 13: ZOOTOPIA Aloha Hula 7:30 Aug 20: CASABLANCA Bellingham Dance 7:00 Aug. 27: THE PRINCESS BRIDE Tom 7:00 Facebook/FairhavenOutdoorCinema CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 13

14 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD BY AMY KEPFERLE outside HIKING RUNNING GARDENING Walk This Way THE SPORT OF THE PEOPLE EVER SINCE my dad jogged so often he wore down the cartilage in his knees and had to have it replaced with a nonhuman substance, I ve been wary of running and that s before I heard that picking up the pace on the regular may damage your heart, cause osteoarthritis and stress the immune system. Luckily, if you have sturdy shoes in your possession, there are options for what to do to relieve stress, lower your cholesterol and get in better shape. When the Northwest Tulip Trekkers host a weekend of walking Aug. 6 in White Rock, BC and Aug. 7 at Bellingham s Lake Padden, attendees can get in step to find out more about the club, which is part of the American Volkssport Association (AVA). Translated as sport of the people, Volkssporting consists of organized, non-competitive events designed not only to promote physical fitness, but also to encourage those taking part in the public events to find pleasure in their natural surroundings. The volkssporting philosophy simply recognizes that everyone cannot and should not attempt to exercise in timed or competitive events where awards are based on order of finish, reads a missive on the Tulip Trekkers website. Volkssporting offers a great escape for people from the pressures and hassles of everyday life, and it provides an excellent opportunity to get out and enjoy nature. Since events are non-competitive, participants travel at their own pace, thus making this an excellent outdoor recreational activity for the entire family. Since beginning in southern Germany in the early 1960s, Volkssporting has grown to encompass 27 member nations, ATTEND WHAT: Volksswalks with the Surrey Trekkers and NW Tulip Trekkers WHEN & WHERE: 10am Sat., Aug. 6 (Peace Arch Park) and 8:30-11am Sun., Aug. 7 (Lake Padden) COST: $2 for the first event, free for the second INFO: www. nwtrekkers.org including much of Europe, Japan, Canada, and the United States. Among those members are the Tulip Trekkers, who host 19 permanent walks in Whatcom, Skagit, and Island counties each year. When they join the Surrey Trekkers for Saturday s event starting at Peace Arch Park s Beach Road, it ll be for a walk along the lawns and gardens leading to White Rock and views of the ocean. The next day, the excursion will take place on the other side of the border among the forested finery of Lake Padden. And whether walkers choose to participate in one event or both, cross-border pollination is sure to be part of each enjoyable outing. Plus, you ll burn a few calories along the way and, hopefully, have a good time. One of our primary goals, both on a national and local level, is to get people interested in walking for their health and well-being, Tulip Trekkers vice president Joe Pipia says. So walk don t run to join them. Your knees will thank you. AUG. 3-6 TRACTOR SHOW: The Puget Sound Antique Tractor & Machinery Association (PSATMA) hosts its 45th annual Antique Tractor Show & Threshing Bee from 7am-7pm Wednesday through Friday, and 7am-5pm Saturday at Lynden s Berthusen Memorial Park, 8837 Berthusen Rd. Entry is $3-$7. WWWW.PSATMA.COM AUG. 4-7 SKAGIT TOURS: Seattle City Light, NCI, and the National Park Service offer Diablo Lake boat tours, Gorge powerhouse tours and Newhalem tours Thursdays through Mondays through the summer in and around the three dams near Highway 20. Newhalem at Night walking tours are free; other tours are $12-$40. FRI., AUG. 5 GOLF FUNDRAISER: The Opportunity Council will host the annual Golf FORE! Good? fundraising tournament from 9am-5pm at Shuksan Golf Course, 1500 E. Axton Rd. Entry is $125 per person or $500 per team. HISTORY WALK-ABOUT: Join Bellingham Parks and Rec for a History Walk-About at 2pm starting at the pavilion at Maritime Heritage Park, 514 W. Holly St. No registration is required OR AUG. 5-6 SIN & GIN TOURS: Learn more about the history of vice and sin that helped make the foundation of our urban locales what they are today at the Good Time Girls annual Sin & Gin Tours at 7pm Friday in Fairhaven next to Skylark s Hidden Cafe ( th St.) and 7pm Saturday at the Bureau of Historical Investigation (217 W. Holly St.). Tickets are $15-$20. SAT., AUG. 6 ART DASH: As part of the Anacortes Arts Festival, sign up for the annual Art Dash starting at 7am on 4th Street in downtown Anacortes. Choose from a halfmarathon, 10K or 5K. Entry is $30-$50. MILES FOR MEMORIES: Help raise awareness of Alzheimer s and other dementias by signing up for the 17th annual Miles for Memories 5K Walk/Run taking place from 8am-12pm starting and ending at the Fairhaven Village Green, th St. Entry is $30. RUN4LIFE: The third annual Run- 4Life starts at 10am at Lummi Island s Beach Store Cafe, 2200 doit N. Nugent Rd. Entry to take part in the 10.9K or 5.8K run or walk is $30-$35. EVENTBRITE.COM BOAT & CAR SHOW: Attend the 16th annual La Conner Classic Boat & Car Show from 10am-4pm at the La Conner Marina. Entry is $3. HOLLY STREET HISTORY TOUR: The Bureau of Historical Investigation teams up with the COB to offer free Holly Street History Tours at 1pm starting in front of the Chuckanut Sandstone building at 311 E. Holly St. Please register in advance. AUG. 6-7 DRAYTON HARBOR DAYS: A 5K Run to the Border, tall ship tours and sails, live music, arts and crafts booths, a pancake breakfast, Pirate Daze, a raft race, Plover ferry rides, boat displays and much more will be part of the annual Drayton Harbor Days from 10am- 5pm Saturday and Sunday at the Blaine Marina and beyond. Many events are free. MARITIME.ORG SUN., AUG. 7 SUMMER RIDE: Join a Breeze Around Lynden Summer Ride from 1-3pm starting and finishing at City Bible Church North Sound, 1986 Main St. Entry is free. SUMMER TUES., AUG. 9 HIKING SAFETY: Everett Mountain Rescue s Guy Mansfield leads a Hiking Safety: Secrets of Search and Rescue presentation at 6pm at REI, th St OR DIG INTO FALL: As part of a Dig Into Fall series, join Master Gardener Valerie Rose and Jay Williams, Garden Center Coordinator at the Skagit Valley Food Co-op, for a Fall and Winter Gardening presentation at 6pm at the Mount Vernon Library, 315 Snoqualmie St. ALL-PACES RUN: The weekly All-Paces Run starts at 6pm every Tuesday at Fairhaven Runners, th St. Entry is free. HISTORY CRUISE: Join Whatcom Museum s annual History Sunset Cruise outing at 6:15pm leaving from the Bellingham Cruise Terminal, 355 Harris Ave. Historians helm the educational excursions aboard San Juan Cruises Victoria Star. Entry is $28-$35.

15 BY AMY KEPFERLE Summer Skate HOT AUGUST NIGHTS COOLING DOWN on scorching summer days can be accomplished in a variety of ways, often involving refreshing bodies of water. Keri Ferguson, Skating Academy Director at Bellingham Sportsplex for the past year, has another idea. The rink is busier this summer than ever before due to camps, but generally people think of skating as a winter sport and, honestly, it s a great place to be when it s hot outside, she says. As a way to draw attention to the ice rink as a community gathering place for skaters of all skill levels and offer residents a way to beat the heat, Ferguson and crew will be hosting Hot August Nights Aug. 5-6 at the Sportsplex. The event will kick off at 4pm both days with a classic car show, food trucks and a beer garden in the parking lot. Come 6pm, attendees can make their way inside to watch performers take to the ice to share their talents. This was a way to bring some of my past students to our community and honor some of the Sportsplex-past students that we have brought home to skate, Ferguson says. We will have the U.S. National Junior Pairs Champions, coached by my former student Jim Peterson and his coaching partner, Amanda Evora. Amanda is a former Olympic pairs competitor and trained with Jim at the Vancouver Olympics. We also have talented local skaters that are currently in our programs. As a coach of more than 30 years, Ferguson says she s stage THEATER DANCE PROFILES dedicated to helping everyone from grassroots to champions find their way on the ice. She acknowledges that not everyone is able to be a competitive skater, but thinks every student she and her fellow coaches teach can learn to be an accomplished test skater and wonderful human being. ATTEND WHAT: Hot August Nights Ice Skating Show WHEN: 6pm Fri.- Sat., Aug. 5-6 WHERE: Bellingham Sportsplex, 1225 Civic Field Way COST: www. bellingham sportsplex.com To that end, she passes on lessons she learned when she was training to compete, such as Hard work does pay off, but you need to have a happy heart to get there, and When we fall down, we get up fast. And even though being director of the Skating Academy is keeping her busy, Ferguson says she still makes time to co-coach with her staff, and loves seeing skaters embrace the sport. I love building confidence and discipline in young people and coaching them to reach their own goals, she says. When I see a skater feel joy or any other emotion on the ice, I know it is reaching their soul and when you skate from the heart there is not much that can stop you. STAGE THURS., AUG. 4 GOOD, BAD, UGLY: Watch The Good, the Bad and the Ugly at 8pm every Thursday at the Upfront Theatre, 1208 Bay St. At 10pm, stick around for The Project. Entry is $8 for the early show, $5 for the late one OR AUG. 4-6 THE SHOE PLAY: Bellingham TheatreWorks presents showings of Quality: The Shoe Play for the final weekend at 7:30pm Thursday through Saturday at Fairhaven s 12th Street Shoes, 1204 Harris Ave. The black comedy by Vancouver playwright Elaine Avila focuses on two ambitious women as they attempt to navigate and conquer the world of selling high-end designer shoes. Tickets are $15. THEATREWORKS.ORG AUG. 4-7 SHAKESPEARE NW: Familial strife, an impending war with Rome, a villainous Italian, rugged mountaineers and hilarious hijinks will make appearances when Cymbeline shows at 7pm Thursday and Saturday at Mount Vernon s Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, Rexville Grange Rd. See the Bard s classic tale of love and money set in a town that s known to love its money when The Merchant of Vegas shows at 7pm Friday and 4pm Sunday. Tickets are $10-$13. Additional performances happen Aug NOT MY DEPARTMENT: Local playwright Willow McLaughlin s That s Not My Department continues this week with 7:30pm performances Thursday through Saturday, and 2pm Sunday at the Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave. The comedy focuses on a woman who starts a new job at an upscale department store, only to realize the place is full of wacky employees and even crazier customers. Tickets are $20; additional shows happen through Aug AUG. 5-6 DOUBLES: Two-person improv teams will take on the weight of multiple performers at Doubles shows at 9pm Friday and Saturday at the Upfront Theatre, 1208 Bay St. With only each other to rely on, anything might happen. Tickets are $10-$12. SAT., AUG. 6 PRINCESS AND THE PEA: The Missoula Children s Theatre and scores of local kids who have been taking part in a weeklong theater camp present showings of The Princess and the Pea at 3pm and 7pm at the Mount Baker Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St. Tickets are $ OR WWW. MOUNTBAKERTHEATRE.COM doit MON., AUG. 8 GUFFAWINGHAM: A weekly open mic for comedians, Guffawingham!, takes place at 9:30pm every Monday at the Green Frog, 1015 N. State St. Entry is free. TUES., AUG. 9 BIFT: Four Upfront Theatre improvisors will present two sets of shortform improv comedy games at Beer + Improv + Food Truck (BIFT) shows at 6:30pm every Tuesday through Aug. 30 at the beer garden at Boundary Bay Brewery, 1107 Railroad Ave. Tickets to the interactive, familyfriendly comedy show are $5 (free for those 12 and under). OR WWW. BBAYBREWERY.COM AUG NUNSENSE: Find out what happens when the Little Sisters of Hoboken decide to raise funds for a mass burial by putting on a variety show when Dan Goggin s musical comedy Nunsense shows as part of Western Summer Theatre at performances at 7:30pm Wednesday through Saturday, and 2pm Sunday at Western Washington University s Performing Arts Center Mainstage. Tickets are $11-$ OR DANCE FRI., AUG. 5 SWING DANCE: Bellingham s swing community will come together to celebrate the historic dance of the 1920s- 40s at a Swing Dance starting at 6pm at BAAY Theatre, 1059 N. State St. The event will kick off with a crash course on the basics, continue with dancing and end with BAAY s Swing Team performing choreography from the past and present. Entry is free. DANCING ON THE GREEN: Bellingham Parks and Rec s weekly Dancing on the Green event takes place from 7-9:30pm at the Fairhaven Village Green, th St. Tonight s gathering kicks off with a lesson by State Street Fusion. DANCING-ON-THE-GREEN SAT., AUG. 6 SALSA NIGHT: Join DJ Antonio Diaz as he mixes a fabulous combination of the best Latin rhythms at Rumba Northwest s bimonthly Salsa Night taking place from 9:30pm- 12am at Cafe Rumba, 1140 N. State St. Entry is $4. SUN., AUG. 7 BALLET SHORTS: View excerpts from Les Sylphides, Paquita, and Don Quixote at 3pm at Northwest Ballet s Bellingham studio at 1417 Cornwall Ave. Admission is free. CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 15

16 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD LAST STAND: CEDAR, BY KAREN RUDD BY AMY KEPFERLE Anniversary Party SEVEN DECADES OF ART AND HISTORY visual GALLERIES OPENINGS PROFILES THE VISITOR who left a withering comment related to the Just Women exhibit currently on display at Whatcom Museum s Lightcatcher Building made a grevious error. He or she couldn t understand why the curator had chosen to open the show with Dale Gottlieb s Tuskegee Airmen, an enormous wool rug paying homage to the first black escort pilots in World War II. The problem wasn t with the subject matter, but with the fact that the commenter believed Gottlieb was a male artist making the Just Women focus of the exhibit a moot point. They were angry, but unjustifiably so. Dale Gottlieb is a woman, I wrote in the notebook for those who were under the assumption the peeved patron was correct. Google it. I knew Gottlieb a Bellingham-based painter, illustrator and story rug creator who s shown her work both locally and internationally was female because I ve written about her in these pages before. And as I perused the rest of the paintings, sculptures, photographs and videos that were drawn from the museum s extensive collection focusing on women s contributions to the arts, I spotted other intriguing artists who ve caught my attention in the umpteen years I ve been writing about exhibits in Whatcom County. Among them were painter Helmi Juvonen ( ), etcher Helen Loggie ( ), woodcut artist Elizabeth Colborne ( ), painter Susan Bennerstrom, photographer Mary Randlett, mixed-media master Lesley Dill, and Karen Rudd, who works with corrugated cardboard to create realistic-looking wood recreations. There s a good story behind all of the pieces, I overheard a docent tell a trio of three older ladies who were listening inently to what she had to say. To hear some of those tales and more take a tour of Just Women during the Whatcom Museum s Open House Thurs., Aug. 11 happening throughout the venue s campus. The event celebrates 75 years of sharing art and history with the community, and promises to merge the historical with the contemporary something that s been happening since the space first opened its doors as the ATTEND WHAT: 75th Anniversary Celebration and Open House WHERE: Whatcom Museum s Old City Hall, Lightcatcher Building, and Syre Education Center WHEN: 12-8pm Thurs., Aug. 11 COST: Free INFO: www. whatcom museum.org Bellingham Public Museum on Jan. 23, In addition to Just Women, Colorfast: Vivid Installations Make Their Mark, and Yesteryear Athletes: Sports Photos from the Archives at the Lightcather, visitors at the free birthday party can also view Nostalgic Saturation: Mid-Century Bellinhgam in Historic Color at the Old City Hall and view an audiovisual journey spanning the building s 124-year history. A new maritime gallery will also be on display, giving an overview of Bellingham Bay s history from early steam ships to fisheries and notable schooners that once sailed the bay. We ve been working hard with a team of staff to prepare stories and items from our collection for these new history exhibits, Executive Director Patricia Leach says. Exhibition and building tours, live music in the Lightcatcher and Old City Hall, a sidewalk chalk art contest, food trucks, art projects for kids, cake, welcoming remarks by Mayor Kelli Linville and more will be part of the event, which also acts as a way to welcome the next 75 years of community engagement. The Whatcom Museum is proud to celebrate this milestone anniversary, Leach says. We are committed to continuing the legacy of providing art and history to the community. doit UPCOMING EVENTS THURS., AUG. 4 MOUNT VERNON ART WALK: Artists of all ages will be featured at the monthly First Thursday Art Walk from 5-8pm in downtown Mount Vernon. A Children s Art Walk showcasing the work of artists 15 and younger can be seen at Tri Dee Arts and Miss May s Creative Learning Store, and a Community Hang-up will be featured at the Front Gallery (420 Myrtle St.). Additional exhibits happen throughout the downtown core. JANSEN OPENING: An opening reception for an exhibit featuring works by Barbara Sternberger, Lynne Oulman, and Colleen Hoffenbacker can be attended from 6-8pm at Lynden s Jansen Art Center, 321 Front St. In addition to meeting the trio, attendees can visit with artists from the Late Summer Juried Exhibit who will be on hand to share their works. FRI., AUG. 5 ANACORTES ART WALK: A.C.M.E. Creative Spaces, Anacortes Oil & Vinegar Bar, Burton Jewelers, the Depot Art Center, the Good Stuff Arts, the Port Transit Shed, Scott Milo Gallery, the Majestic Inn and Spa, and PDA Marketing Group will be among those opening their doors from 6-9pm as part of the monthly First Friday Art Walk in downtown Anacortes. The free event happens in conjunction with opening night of the Anacortes Arts Festival. BELLINGHAM ART WALK: Allied Arts, Artifacts, Bayou on Bay, Brandywine Kitchen, the Foundry, the Bureau, Ciao Thyme, the Community Food Co-op, Dakota Gallery, Downtown Visitors Center, Fourth Corner Frames, Fringe, Garcia Jewelers, the Leopold, the Lucky Monkey, Make.Shift Art Space, the Max Higbee Center, Runaway Press, Social Fabric, Third Planet, Toasty FLora, Wandering Oaks, Western City Center, Whatcom Land Trust, and Whatcom Museum will be among the venues opening their doors for the monthly Art Walk taking place from 6-10pm in downtown Bellingham. Get details about each exhibit online, or pick up maps at participating locales. ALLIED ARTS: View the figurative paintings and illustrations of Joe Egan, Jenny Chatterton, Rafael Mithuna, Ruth Mueseler, and Ingrid McGarry at an opening reception for Go Figure from 6-9pm at Allied Arts, 1418 Cornwall Ave. The works show through Aug FEED YOUR HEAD: Music by Margaret Inez Driscoll and Jan Peters, monotypes by Ruth Heese, and food samples will be part of a monthly Feed Your Head event happening in conjunction with the Art Walk from 6-8pm at the Community Food Co-op, 1220 N. Forest St. Entry is free. FOURTH CORNER: An opening reception for Getting There takes place from 6-9pm at Fourth Corner Frames & Gallery, 311 W. Holly St. The exhibit focuses on images of ways to get from here to there whether it s via a motorcycle, desert racing car, bike, boat or elephant created by Kelcey Bates, Chelsea Davidson, Rob Gischer, Lorna Libert, and Ron Pattern. See it through Aug. 30.

17 doit MAKE.SHIFT: View original works inspired by the beloved childhood literary staple known as the Little Golden Books series at an opening reception for the invitational group art show Stay Gold from 6-10pm at Make.Shift Art Space, 306 Flora St. The exhibit is the brainchild of beloved local artist Steeb Russell, who invited more than 15 artists of various mediums to join in his celebration of the classic books. See it through Sept SCULPTURE NW: An opening reception for Electric and Kinetic begins at 6pm at Sculpture Northwest, 203 Prospect St. These interactive and sculptural marvels by 14 noteworthy Northwest artists invite the viewer to completely engage and imagine via unconventional sculptures that defy pigeonholing. See them trough Oct. 1. NORTHWESTERN SOCIAL FABRIC: See performance and installation artist Christen Mattix s For Longing at an opening reception at 6pm at Social Fabric, 1302 Commercial Ave. Mattix sat on a bench on a corner and knitted a line to the sea. August is the one-year anniversary of the unrolling of this knitted line down Taylor Street to Taylor dock and into Bellingham Bay. AUG. 5-7 ANACORTES ARTS FESTIVAL: More than 250 juried booth artists will share their creative wares as part of the 55th annual Anacortes Arts Festival happening from 10am-7pm Friday, 10am-6pm Saturday, and 10am-5pm Sunday throughout historic downtown Anacortes. A Arts at the Port fine art exhibit, steamroller block printing, working studios, live music and entertainment, an emerging artist venue, an Art Dash, food trucks galore, a hands-on youth area and more will be part of the free, three-day artistic extravaganza. SAT., AUG. 6 PAPO 2016: Thirty area artists will be painting in the great outdoors as part of the 11th annual Plein Air Paint Out from 9am-5pm along or near the Holly Street corridor in downtown Bellingham. The evens is way to promote public awareness and appreciation of plein air painting and art in Bellingham. Stop and talk to the artists, and view their finished work at an exhibit in September at Mindport Gallery. For artists wanting to take part, there s an entry fee of $55 (includes framing). JANSEN BIRTHDAY PARTY: Art activities, live music, an ice cream social and birthday cake will be part of a Fourth Birthday Party taking place from 11am-5pm at Lynden s Jansen Art Center, 321 Front St. All of the J s creative art studios will be open during the party, and art activities and demonstrations for kids and adults will be set up throughout the building. Attendees are encouraged to visit each activity to collect stamps and win prizes. Additionally, the Ceramics Studio will hold their annual Ice Cream Bowl Fundraiser, where handcrafted bowls will be sold for $10, and filled with ice cream. HUGHES RECEPTION: Meet artist Linda Hughes at a reception for her Variations on a Theme exhibit from 2-5pm at Good Earth Pottery, 1000 Harris Ave. See the elaborately functional stoneware through August. SHERMAN ALEXIE has been BOOKED at the BAKER! Friday, August 5, 7pm Village Books and the Mount Baker Theatre are excited to welcome this entertaining & brilliant author back to Bellingham with his first children s book. All Ages! TICKETS $5 Now available at Village Books, Mount Baker Theatre, and mountbakertheatre.com James & Aiden CAMPBELL Braving It A Father, A Daughter, and an Unforgettable Journey into the Alaskan Wild At turns poignant and humorous, this is an ode to America s disappearing wilderness and a profound meditation on what it means for a child to grow up and a parent to finally, fully let go. Sunday, August 14, 4pm VILLAGE BOOKS th St, Bellingham & 430 Front St, Lynden CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 17

18 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD BY CAREY ROSS, PHOTOS BY BEN SHAEVITZ Stringband Jamboree HAPPY BIRTHDAY SWEET SIXTEEN music SHOW PREVIEWS RUMOR HAS IT I FIRST met singer/songwriter Robert Sarazin Blake not long after I moved to Bellingham, now half of my life ago. For a few memorable years, he was my next-door neighbor and I would see him on a near-daily basis, which was a little weird for both of us. I have made more jokes in print at his expense than I have anyone else in Bellingham and he has taken every last one of them in stride, a quality that can be hard to come by in local musicians. I have also watched him grow the Subdued Stringband Jamboree, the festival he founded 16 years ago, from a harebrained scheme cobbled together by Blake and a few of his friends who had more ideas than knowhow into the mostly well-oiled machine it is today. Although it has grown in size and proficiency of execution over the years, much of Stringband remains as it ever was a steadfastly local, stubbornly grassroots affair that is steeped in goodwill and staffed by the cheeriest crew of committed volunteers you ll find anywhere. Blake has added days, stages and other elements to his festival as it has evolved, but not because he needs Stringband to be the biggest thing around quite the contrary, in fact. The changes he s made exist to serve the music and the people who make the journey, year after year, to the expansive field of the Deming Log Show Fairgrounds to kick up a little dust and allemande left, all in the name of a down-home good time. Blake has also tinkered with the lineup over the past decade-and-a-half, some years trying on bigger headliners, some years increasing or scaling back the regional footprint from which he draws musicians, and has settled on a roster that is mostly local, familiar faces with a smattering of carefully chosen bands and musicians from farther-flung locales. Blake then rounds out the proceedings with a daily square dance, workshops, late-night stages, a gospel sing-along and my favorite piece of the Stringband puzzle, the band scramble, in which bands are formed by plucking names out of a hat, only to take the stage and play a set a short time later. After the horde of Jamboree volunteers descends upon the Deming Log Show Fairgrounds to build the main Flat stage and the smaller Slanted stage, get the backstage area squared away, test the sound, set up boundaries and barriers, and generally ATTEND do all the other pre-festival WHAT: Subdued behind-the-scenes work Stringband we take for granted, musicians will begin to show Jamboree WHERE: Deming Log Show up, and the man himself, Fairgrounds, Robert Sarazin Blake, will Deming kick off the festival at 5pm WHEN: Aug. Thurs., Aug. 11 with his Family Band. From there, music COST: $25-$120 will alternate between the INFO: www. stringband two stages, but you can expect to see Yogoman, Willie jamboree.com Reavis & His Weary Boys, and the Crying Shame before Lache Cercel & the Roma Swing Ensemble close out the first night of the 2016 Jamboree. The next day, Fri., Aug. 12, Stone Jones & the Stage Crew Band will start things off on the Slanted stage, where you ll also see Meghan Yates, the Free Range Reveleers, the Stephen Nikleva Band, and more as the day goes on. The Flat stage will play host to Grace Love, Peadar MacMahon & Friends, Pete Irving & the Best Intentions, Lone Pinon, Sierra Ferrell, Hamell on Trial (one of Blake s favorites), and Petunia and the Vipers (one of my favorites). Same goes for Sat., Aug. 13, except the Slanted stage music begins bright and early, at 9am, with Robert T. MacDonald III, who will hand the reins off to everyone from the rumor has it I LIKE MARITIME Heritage Park. I like its location, snugged up against Bellingham s downtown core, within easy reach for just about anyone who d like to reach it. I like its mix of features, its green space, its wooded trails, the bridge from which you can watch Whatcom Creek s personality change by season and according to weather. I harbor a special soft spot for the fish hatchery there, where, back when a trip through Maritime was part of my daily walk home, I could observe the rapid growth of the hatchlings in the rearing ponds and wonder how much they knew of the truly astonishing life journey they would have. Or, I should say, I like the idea of Maritime Heritage Park. The reality of the place is, as we all know, more problematic than the idyllic scenario I ve outlined above. A quick Google search for Maritime Heritage Park is illustrative of some of the issues that plague this public space. While the first search result yields the link to the City of Bellingham webpage devoted to the park, the next two are headlines from the Bellingham Herald that read, Body found in Bellingham s Maritime BY CAREY ROSS Heritage Park and Sketch released of rapist in Maritime Heritage Park attack. Owing to a confluence of factors proximity to the Lighthouse Mission, an increasing homeless population that is met with decreasing resources to house and help them, the fact that Bellingham is, for the most part, a kind-hearted place full of people who realize that public access to a public place is inclusive of all parts of the public Maritime Heritage Park has both a public safety and a public image problem. Solutions to these problems are as complex as the situations that cause them to exist. But Bellingham Parks and Recreation aims to do their part in creating a more positive, welcoming culture at the park. And what better means of accomplishing such a goal than to throw free concerts there, and invite the whole town. That s exactly what they ve done with this year s Music at Maritime series, beginning at 6pm Weds., Aug. 10 which just happens to be one week after the last Downtown Sounds concert, meaning we can all just take that party, move it about a block away, and pick it back up (almost) where it left off. The first concert will feature the 10-piece soul powerhouse known as Baby Cakes, who will set the tone and get people dancing. Following them will be Polecat (always a huge draw, and for good reason) on Aug. 17, and Staxx Brothers will close out the series on Aug. 24. Kulshan Community Land Trust is responsible for the beer garden, and along with music and beer, Parks and Rec promises lawn games and other family-friendly activities. Will a few concerts in Maritime Heritage solve all the problems that plague the park? No. But it s a good start.

19 STRINGBAND, FROM PAGE 18 Bellingham Circus Guild and Peter Blake & Mountain Thyme to Marcel & Nakos and the Sweet Goodbyes before the day is done. Commanding your attention on the Flat stage will be Louis Ledford & the Little Shots, Robert Sarazin Blake (you didn t think he d relegate himself to just one set on the Slanted stage, did you?) the Jacob Joliff Trio, Three for Silver, the Dusty 45s, the Crow Quill Night Owls, and others before the night ends with the much-beloved and always-entertaining All-Star Jamboree, where anything can and generally does happen. As mentioned, each day features a 6pm square dance (if you don t know how, don t worry you ll find ample opportunity to pick up the necessary skill set), and after the last notes of the day ring out from the Flat stage, late-night festivities featuring the likes of Sarah Goodin, Sierra Ferrell, Devin Champlin, Jefferson Hamer, Strangely, and more will provide you with a soundtrack to dance to under the stars. WED., AUG. 3 DOWNTOWN SOUNDS: Lyrics Born and Mostafa s Super Group close out Downtown Bellingham Partnership s 13th annual Downtown Sounds concert series at 6pm at the intersection of Bay and Prospect streets. Entry is free. HYMN SING: The Vedder Mountain Pickers will perform at tonight s Community Hymn Sing and Dessert Social at 7pm at Lynden s First Christian Reformed Church, 1010 Front St. A free-will offering will be taken to raise funds for the Lynden Choral Society. THURS., AUG. 4 BLUES & BREWS: Jasmine Greene will perform at tonight s Blues, Brews & BBQ summer music series taking place from 5-9pm on the waterfront terrace at Hotel Bellwether, One Bellwether Way. Entry is free. PARK MUSIC: Listen and dance to the rock sounds of bandzandt from 6-8pm at the summer concert series at Elizabeth Park. The free, family-friendly concerts continue every Thursday through Aug RIVERWALK CONCERT SERIES: Bobby Holland and the Breadline perform at the Riverwalk Summer Concert Series from 6-8pm at the Skagit Riverwalk Park plaza in historic Mount Vernon. Entry is free. AUG. 4-7 MARROWSTONE MUSIC FESTIVAL: Orchestral and chamber music rehearsals, master classes, and professional performances will be part of the 73rd Marrowstone Music Festival taking place through Aug. 7 at WWU. Public concerts happen at 7:30pm Aug. 4 and 6 at WWU s Performing Arts Center and Aug. 7 at the Mount Baker Theatre. Prices vary. doit By the time the 2016 Subdued Stringband Jamboree winds down on Sun., Aug. 14 with a gospel sing-along led by Meghan Yates, Louis Ledford, and Grace Love, you ll be thoroughly entertained, your itch to square dance will be scratched, you ll be glowing with Stringband s particular brand of public goodwill, and you ll probably be at least a little dirty but content in the knowledge that you are living just right. FRI., AUG. 5 FARM TUNES: Sandblom performs on the patio as part of the summer s Farm Tunes series from 6-9pm at BelleWood Acres, 6140 Guide Meridian. At the free event, you can enjoy food, spirits and fun. SAT., AUG. 6 ALBUM RELEASE CONCERT: The Katie Gray performs at an album release party for her contemporary pop release, Songs About Stuff, at 7:30pm at Tillie Lace Gallery, th St. In addition to Gray, the show will feature Morgan Paris Lanza and Jessie Thoreson. Suggested donation is $5-$15. SEABREEZE JAZZ BAND: The seven-man Seabreeze Jazz Band performs at 7:30pm at the chamber hall at Lynden s Jansen Art Center, 321 Front St. Tickets are $10. SUN., AUG. 7 INTERNATIONAL SERIES: Experience traditional music and dance when the Laotian troupe Kinnaly Lao kicks off the 10th annual Peace Arch International Concert Series at 2pm at Blaine s Peace Arch Provincial Park. Additional concerts happen Sundays through Aug. 28. Entry is free; a Washington State Parks Discover Pass is required for parking inside of the park. WED., AUG. 10 MUSIC AT MARITIME: Baby Cakes will perform at the first of three Music at Maritime summer concerts from 6-8pm at Maritime Heritage Park, 500 W. Holly St. Additional free concerts happen Aug. 17 (Polecat) and Aug. 24 (the Staxx Brothers). Food will be available for purchase, and there will also be a beer garden hosted by Kulshan CLT (read more about it in the Aug. 3 Rumor Has It column) OR Law Offices of Alexander F. Ransom Experienced. Effective. Exceptional. Compassionate Criminal Defense Attorney Fighting for Your Rights 119 NORTH COMMERCIAL ST. SUITE #1420 OFFICE: (360) CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 19

20 musicvenues CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD See below for venue addresses and phone numbers Anelia's Kitchen & Stage Bellewood Acres Boundary Bay Brewery Amy Hindman Grassblue Jennings & Keller Happy Hour w/robert Blake, Twilight Concert w/the Free Range Reveleers Sandblom Friday Fish Fry w/ SwanVaughn Bob Fossil, Crooked Neighbours, Asterhouse Brown Lantern Ale House Acoustic Night Open Mic Three-ish Commodore Ballroom Conway Muse Corner Pub Downtown Sounds WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY The Cat Empire, Sarah MacDougall Lyrics Born, Mostafa Supergroup Irish & Folk Night w/alex Sturbaum, Jan Peters The Mavericks Snakehips Foals Foals Douglas Francisco, Nelson Emokpae, Amara Grace Knut Bell and the 360s Tony Furtado Joe T. Cook Blues Band Eat Orb Trio w/adrian Clarke Rich Rorex Spencer Redmond Out of the Ashes (afternoon), BIFT (evening) REID JAMIESON/Aug. 4/ Green Frog Anelias Kitchen & Stage 511 Morris St., La Conner (360) Bellewood Acres 6140 Guide Meridian, Lynden (360) Bobby Lee s Pub & Eatery 108 W. Main St., Everson Boundary Bay Brewery 1107 Railroad Ave Brown Lantern Ale House 412 Commercial Ave., Anacortes (360) The Business 216 Commercial Ave., Anacortes (360) Chuckanut Brewery 601 W. Holly St Commodore Ballroom 868 Granville St., Vancouver (604) Conway Muse Spruce/Main St., Conway (360) Corner Pub Allen West Road, Burlington Eat Restaurant & Bar 1200 Cornwall Ave 2016/2017 COUPON BOOK $10 Choose local businesses taking action for a healthy hy community.

21 musicvenues See below for venue addresses and phone numbers WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY Edison Inn Tracy Jones The Margaret Wilder Band Live Music Glow Nightclub DJ J-Will Friday Night Fire DJ Boombox Kid Green Frog 10 String Symphony Reid Jamieson Hot Damn Scandal, Three for Silver The Sky Colony, Willy Reavis and His Weary Boys Slow Jam (early), Peter Bradley Adams (late) H2O DJ Ryan I The Lucky Losers Karaoke Honey Moon Open Mic w/scot Casey Jessie Thoreson The Easy Tigers Gallowglass Kulshan Brewing Co. Broken Bow Stringband You Knew Me When Loco Billy's Wild Moon Saloon Jam Night/Open Mic Dancin' Jen Wes Jones Band Main St. Bar and Grill JP Falcon Acoustic Showcase Jack Benson Band Exit 266 Make.Shift Art Space Old World Deli Poppe's 360 Art Walk Ryan Sandholm Rockfish Grill Time3Jazz The Ginger Ups Bushwackers Royal Karaoke Karaoke Country Night DJ Jester Open Mic (early), Guffawingham (late) Musical Mondays w/sarah Goodin Rumors Cabaret Panty Hoes Drag Show Throwback Thursday DJ Postal, DJ Shortwave DJ Robby Clark Karaoke w/zach The Shakedown Ibex Monolord, Beastmaker, more Silver Reef Hotel Casino Spa DJ Big Rez Live Music Skagit Casino 4More 4More Skylark's Kid'Sax Telefonic Stirred Not Shaken Swillery Whiskey Bar Karaoke Singer/Songwriter Night Swinomish Casino and Lodge Crooked Neighbours, Thegn, Freddie Empire The Phoenix Clambake, FairLady, Mars to Fish The Phoenix The Underground DJ B-Mello DJ B-Mello A Collection of Cyclops Skulls, Old Man Wizard Via Cafe and Bistro Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke The Village Inn Jam Night Karaoke The Waterfront Wild Buffalo 90s Night w/dj Boombox Kid Redwood Sol, Flais, Freddie Embpire Live Music Hurray for the Riff Raff, Robert Sarazin Blake Shaunic & Jules, Boombox Kid, Bugaboo Gregory Alan Isakov and the Ghost Orchestra, Andrea Gibson FOALS/Aug. 7-8/ Commodore Ballroom Hot Chip Lache Cercel (early), Soul Explosion w/dj Willdabeast (late) Poetic Sexploration w/tawnya Selene Renelle ROBERT SARAZIN BLAKE/Aug. 4/ Boundary Bay The Green Frog 1015 N. State St. Edison Inn 5829 Cains Ct., Edison (360) Glow 202 E. Holly St H 2 0, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes (360) Honey Moon 1053 N. State St KC s Bar and Grill 108 W. Main St., Everson (360) Kulshan Brewery 2238 James St Loco Billy s Wild Moon Saloon nd Ave. NW, Stanwood Make.Shift Art Space 306 Flora St. Main Street Bar & Grill 2004 Main St., Ferndale (360) McKay s Taphouse 1118 E. Maple St. (360) Poppe s 714 Lakeway Dr Paso Del Norte 758 Peace Portal Dr. Blaine (360) The Redlight 1017 N. State St. com Rockfish Grill 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes (360) The Royal 208 E. Holly St Rumors Cabaret 1119 Railroad Ave The Shakedown 1212 N. State St. www. shakedownbellingham.com Silver Reef Casino 4876 Haxton Way, Ferndale (360) Skagit Valley Casino Resort 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow (360) Skylark s Hidden Cafe th St Swillery Whiskey Bar 118 W. Holly St. Swinomish Casino Casino Dr., Anacortes (888) Temple Bar 306 W. Champion St The Underground 211 E. Chestnut St Underground Coffeehouse Viking Union 3rd Floor, WWU Via Cafe 7829 Birch Bay Dr., Blaine (360) Village Inn Pub 3020 Northwest Ave Vinostrology 120 W. Holly St The Waterfront 521 W. Holly St. Wild Buffalo 208 W. Holly St. To get your live music listings included, send info to cascadiaweekly.com. Deadlines are always at 5pm Friday. Aireeoke CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 21

22 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD REVIEWED BY KENNETH TURAN Dying to Know RAM DASS AND TIMOTHY LEARY film MOVIE REVIEWS FILM SHORTS TIMOTHY LEARY and Ram Dass were, at least as far as public images went, the contrasting faces of the 1960s counterculture. Leary was the LSD advocate, the exuberant popularizer of a turn on, tune in, drop out philosophy. He was called the most dangerous man in America by Richard Nixon and said of himself, I think I ve lived one of the most interesting lives of anyone in the twentieth century. Ram Dass, formerly Richard Alpert, was a scientist-turned-guru who saw himself as a bridge between East and West and wrote a massively popular spiritual treatise called Be Here Now that went through 43 printings. But more important than their apparent differences were their similarities they were both fascinating talkers who never stopped getting a kick out of what the other person had to say. In the documentary Dying to Know: Ram Dass & Timothy Leary, the talk often involves death, which doesn t make it any less involving. An admiring, even loving celebration of these two men by filmmaker Gay Dillingham, Dying to Know had its genesis in 1995, when Leary announced he had the inoperable prostate cancer, which caused his death a year later. Dillingham arranged for the two to have one final My Dinner With Andre-type filmed conversation together, and followed up with individual sessions with both men, including several with Ram Dass after he had a serious stroke in She also added in conversations with people who knew the two men and shared their interests such as New Age doctor Andrew Weil and Zen Buddhist Roshi Joan Halifax. Given the circumstances of their final meeting, it s inevitable that death and dying, the taboo of all time, according to Leary, should be the starting point of the conversation with Ram Dass. Both men, it turns out, share the notion that death can be a celebration; in Ram Dass words, a time when you engage with the deepest meaning of the universe. To put these comments into perspective, Dying to Know (improbably narrated by Robert Redford) provides mini-biographies of both men, filling us in on how they met as well as their lives before and after they connected. Leary, according to Ram Dass and others, was an authority-questioning Irish rebel, an individual of leprechaun-like mischievousness who, someone says, walked between conformity and chaos. For his part, Alpert, in his pre-ram Dass incarnation, was a high-achieving academic from a wealthy background who hid being gay behind a self-confident facade. The two met in the 1960s at Harvard, where they both taught psychology and did research involving the use of psychedelic drugs, first psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, and then LSD itself. Both were powerfully influenced by their initial drug experience, with Leary telling Alpert he d learned more about Leary, according to Ram Dass and others, was an authority-questioning Irish rebel, an individual of leprechaun-like mischievousness who, someone says, walked between conformity and chaos. Alpert, in his pre- Ram Dass incarnation, was a high-achieving academic from a wealthy background who hid being gay behind a selfconfident facade the mind in four hours than in 16 years as a psychologist. When Leary moved on to LSD, whose indiscriminate use he was not an advocate of, he was so affected that he didn t speak for five days. Dying to Know goes through many of the permutations of their careers (there wouldn t be space to deal with them all), including the reasons for the rift that developed between them for a time. Despite periods of what Ram Dass characterizes as both deep friendship and deep enmity, the two ended with a visible mutual respect that made peace with their differences. They both saw themselves, Dying to Know posits, as adventurers exploring alternate realities, and hearing where they ended up is a trip all by itself.

23 film showing this week BY CAREY ROSS FILM SHORTS Bad Moms: Ever since I watched the crowd-funded Veronica Mars movie late one night in a Las Vegas hotel room while I was slightly tipsy, I ve kind of been in love with Kristen Bell. I don t even hate her when she s trying to sell me home appliances. Whether my affection can survive this comedy in which Bell, Mila Kunis, and Kathryn Hahn play moms gone wild is questionable. (R 1 hr. 41 min.) Cafe Society: Woody Allen (alleged to have sexually abused his adopted daughter Dylan Farrow when she was seven years old) crafts his latest in a long series of films that feature an older man smarming all over a much-younger woman because art imitates life even though we re supposed to separate art from the artist or something. No stars forever. (PG-13 1 hr. 25 min.) Captain Fantastic: Viggo Mortensen (definitely fantastic, military rank unknown) is raising six kids in a decidedly eccentric off-grid existence in the deep woods of the Pacific Northwest. Life forces them into civilization and things get even hairier than Mortensen s bountiful beard. (R 1 hr. 58 min.) Dying to Know: Ram Dass and Timothy Leary: See review previous page. (Unrated 1 hr. 35 min.) Finding Dory: Nemo s swimming sidekick gets her own movie, and Pixar gets the box-office-shattering animated hit of the summer and another amazingly heartfelt and beautifully rendered film to add to its groundbreaking canon. All is as it should be. (PG 1 hr. 37 min.) Ghostbusters: Remember when this all-female remake which boasts a killer cast of lady comics was announced and bros lost their shit in a real bad way? I m going to stop rolling my eyes at all those sad, small men just long enough to line up at the box office and vote for this movie with my dollars and I suggest you do the same. (PG-13 1 hr. 45 min.) Hillary s America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party: This movie currently sits at just 4 percent on review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, which could mean the following things: 1. The press (known liberal scourge) is firmly in the pocket of HRC and none of their opinions can be trusted because of conspiracy and Benghazi!!!!! or some shit like that. 2. I could make a movie about watching my cat sleep all day that would be better reviewed than this one. 3. I don t have a third reason. All hail our lizard illuminati overlords. (PG-13 1 hr. 40 min.) Hunt for the Wilderpeople: An old man (a cantankerous Sam Neill) and a troubled teenager take to the PEP PER SIST woods on the lam in this engaging comedy that has won over literally every single one of the more than 100 critics that have reviewed it. Pretty sure you won t be able to say the same about Bad Moms. (PG-13 1 hr. 41 min.) Ice Age: Collision Course: Even its animated dinosaur stars are wishing this series would become extinct. (PG 1 hr. 40 min.) Jason Bourne: When Matt Damon decided to end his run as the unlikeliest action hero since Bruce Willis made everyone die hard, we were all a little sad. But once you live the life of a supremely skilled superspy, it s hard to give up, and so Bourne (and director Paul Greengrass) is back. (PG-13 2 hrs. 3 min.) The Legend of Tarzan: Internet boyfriend Alexander Skarsgard sheds his shirt and swings into his own film franchise. I m sure this movie has some sort of storyline beyond shirtless Skarsgard, but I cannot pretend to care about that. (PG-13 1 hr. 49 min.) Lights Out: 2016 has proven to be an excellent year for horror movies, and this movie, about the terrifying things that go bump in the dark is no exception. ERS COOKING OUTSIDE THE BOX SINCE 1988 Open Nightly Except Monday 1055 N State St B ham (PG-13 1 hr. 21 min.) SUICIDE SQUAD Little Miss Sunshine: The PFC s second Rooftop Cinema of the season brings this feel-good comedy (featuring an unforgettable Oscar-winning performance by a foul-mouthed Alan Arkin) to the top of the Parkade on Fri., Aug. 5. A real loser is someone who s so afraid of not winning he doesn t even try. (R 1 hr. 41 min.) The Martian: Matt Damon gets stranded on Mars, learns to grow his own potatoes and some other stuff happens in this excellent sci-fi drama that s the Sat., Aug. 6 offering for the Fairhaven Outdoor Cinema. (PG-13 2 hrs. 24 min.) The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Orchestra: Yo-Yo Ma, brilliant cellist, 18-time Grammy winner, recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and endlessly delightful man, spends his spare time inviting musicians from the world over many of them refugees to play with him on behalf of his nonprofit organization, Silkroad. Of course he does. He probably rescues kittens, defuses land mines and donates blood before every performance, too. (PG-13 1 hr. 36 min.) Nerve: Games of truth or dare rarely end well especially if they re played online and involve dangerous stunts. Will Emma Roberts make it out alive in this Internet-age thriller? Does anyone care? (PG-13 1 hr. 36 min.) Nine Lives: Ungrateful man who hates cats has accident in which he is transformed into a cat, and then we are supposed to believe he goes to great lengths to get his human form back when we all know full well the only thing cats want to be is cats. (PG 1 hr. 27 min.) The Secret Life of Pets: I spend way too much time thinking about what my cat is doing when I m not around, so this animated movie that shows what animals are up to when they don t have a human audience which then morphs into an urban adventure tale is right up my alley. (PG 1 hr. 31 min.) Star Trek Beyond: Until recently, this movie was going to be known as the first Star Trek feature in the rebooted franchise that wasn t directed by nerd king J.J. Abrams. Now it will go down in history as Anton Yelchin s final turn as Chekov before the actor was killed in a freak accident, and for the big reveal of Sulu as being gay. I m sure this film has a plot or whatever, but who the hell is going to remember that? (PG-13 2 hrs.) Suicide Squad: No summer blockbuster has been more highly anticipated than this one, which hoped to do for DC Comics what smart-ass, foul-mouthed Deadpool did for Marvel too bad it s a big, dumb dud. Give Harley Quinn an R rating and then we ll really see what she can do. (PG-13 1 hr. 40 min.) Showtimes Regal and AMC theaters, please see Pickford Film Center and PFC s Limelight Cinema, please see CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 23

24 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD MIND & BODY bulletinboard 200 MIND & BODY Cerise Noah REALTOR Professional, knowledgeable, fun & friendly to work with. Windermere Real Estate Whatcom, Inc. (360) LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO CALL HOME? Call Jerry Swann - He knows homes! Free Consultation for Home Buyers & Sellers Call today to start your search See Reviews for Jerry at YELP and Zillow WA DOL# MIND & BODY Yoga for Limited Mobility is the focus of a weekly yoga session happening from 10-11:30am Thursdays at the Lummi Island Library, 2144 S. Nugent Rd. All adults are welcome at the free event. More info: (360) All are welcome at a Bellingham Laughter Club meeting at 4pm Sun., Aug. 7 at Bellingham s Elizabeth Park (near the owl sculpture). The event is free to 4- to 104-year-olds, and focuses on embracing laughter for a rich and rewarding life. More info: (360) A Healing with Homeopathy presentation with certified homeopath Monique Arsenault takes place from 11am-12m Thurs,. Aug. 11 at the SkillShare Space at the Bellingham Public Library, 210 Central Ave. Each quarter she explore scommon complaints as well as possible homeopathic solutions which may be appropriate to the situation. Entry is free. More info: (360) Attend a new Pain Relief Yoga in the Svaroopa Style class taking place from 5:30-7pm Fridays at Inspire Studio, 1411 Cornwall Ave. The practice includes the use of props to assist with the poses. Entry is $7. More info: (623) Co-Dependents Anonymous meets from 7-8:30pm Mondays at PeaceHealth St. Joseph s Community Health Education Center, 3333 Squalicum Pkwy, conference room B. Entry is by donation. More info: (360) Attend a Healing Hour from 5:30-6:30pm every Wednesday at Simply Spirit Reading & Healing Center, 1304 Meador Ave. Entry is $5. More info: 200 MIND & BODY Sex Addicts Anonymous meets at 7pm Tuesdays and Thursdays and 9am Saturdays at the Bellingham Unitarian Fellowship, 1207 Ellsworth St. More info: A Grief Support Group meets at 7pm Tuesdays at the St. Luke s Community Health Education Center, 3333 Squalicum Pkwy. Info: Wondering about the nuts and bolts of the homebuying process? Check out our FREE Homebuyer Education classes. Held monthly & open to the public. Register at , x2 BY ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): I apologize in advance for the seemingly excessive abundance of good news I m about to report. If you find it hard to believe, I won t hold your skepticism against you. But I do want you to know that every prediction is warranted by the astrological omens. Ready for the onslaught? 1. In the coming weeks, you could fall forever out of love with a wasteful obsession. 2. You might also start falling in love with a healthy obsession. 3. You can half-accidentally snag a blessing you have been half-afraid to want. 4. You could recall a catalytic truth whose absence has been causing you a problem ever since you forgot it. 5. You could reclaim the mojo that you squandered when you pushed yourself too hard a few months ago. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): August is Adopt-a- Taurus month. It s for all of your tribe, not just the orphans and exiles and disowned rebels. Even if you have exemplary parents, the current astrological omens suggest that you require additional support and guidance from wise elders. So I urge you to be audacious in rounding up trustworthy guardians and benefactors. Go in search of mentors and fairy godmothers. Ask for advice from heroes who are further along the path that you d like to follow. You are ready to receive teachings and direction you weren t receptive to before. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When a parasite or other irritant slips inside an oyster s shell, the mollusk s immune system besieges the intruder with successive layers of calcium carbonate. Eventually, a pearl may form. I suspect that this is a useful metaphor for you to contemplate in the coming days as you deal with the salt in your wound or the splinter in your skin. Before you jump to any conclusions, though, let me clarify. This is not a case of the platitude, Whatever doesn t kill you will make you stronger. Keep in mind that the pearl is a symbol of beauty and value, not strength. CANCER (June 21-July 22): It s your lucky day! Spiritual counsel comparable to what you re reading here usually sells for $ But because you re showing signs that you re primed to outwit bad habits, I m offering it at no cost. I want to encourage you! Below are my ideas for what you should focus on. (But keep in mind that I don t expect you to achieve absolute perfection.) 1. Wean yourself from indulging in selfpity and romanticized pessimism. 2. Withdraw from connections with people who harbor negative images of you. 3. Transcend low expectations wherever you see them in play. 4. Don t give your precious life energy to demoralizing ideas and sour opinions. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You re not doing a baby chick a favor by helping it hatch. For the sake of its well-being, the bird needs to peck its way out of the egg. It s got to exert all of its vigor and willpower in starting its new life. That s a good metaphor for you to meditate on. As you escape from your comfortable womb-jail and launch yourself toward inspiration, it s best to rely as much as possible on your own instincts. Friendly people who would like to provide assistance may inadvertently cloud your access to your primal wisdom. Trust yourself deeply and wildly. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I hear you re growing weary of wrestling with ghosts. Is that true? I hope so. The moment you give up the fruitless struggle, you ll become eligible for a unique kind of freedom that you have not previously imagined. Here s another rumor I ve caught wind of: You re getting bored with an old source of sadness that you ve used to motivate yourself for a long time. I hope that s true, too. As soon as you shed your allegiance to the sadness, you will awaken to a sparkling font of comfort you ve been blind to. Here s one more story I ve picked up through the grapevine: You re close to realizing that your attention to a mediocre treasure has diverted you from a more pleasurable treasure. Hallelujah! LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Could it be true that the way out is the same as the way in? And that the so-called wrong answer is almost indistinguishable from the right answer? And that success, at least the kind of success that really matters, can only happen if you adopt an upside-down, inside-out perspective? In my opinion, the righteous answer to all these questions is YESSS???!!! at least for now. I suspect that the most helpful approach will never be as simple or as hard as you might be inclined to believe. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Your strength seems to make some people uncomfortable. I don t want that to become a problem for you. Maybe you could get away with toning down your potency at other times, but not now. It would be sinful to act as if you re not as competent and committed to excellence as you are. But having said that, I also urge you to monitor your behavior for excess pride. Some of the resistance you face when you express your true glory may be due to the shadows cast by your true glory. You could be tempted to believe that your honorable intentions excuse secretive manipulations. So please work on wielding your clout with maximum compassion and responsibility. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Did you honestly imagine that there would eventually come a future when you d have your loved ones fully trained? Did you fantasize that sooner or later you could get them under control, purged of their imperfections and telepathically responsive to your every mood? If so, now is a good time to face the fact that those longings will never be fulfilled. You finally have the equanimity to accept your loved ones exactly as they are. Uncoincidentally, this adjustment will make you smarter about how to stir up soulful joy in your intimate relationships. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You may experience a divine visitation as you clean a toilet in the coming weeks. You might get a glimpse of a solution to a nagging problem while you re petting a donkey or paying your bills or waiting in a long line at the bank. Catch my drift, Capricorn? I may or may not be speaking metaphorically here. You could meditate up a perfect storm as you devour a doughnut. While flying high over the earth in a dream, you might spy a treasure hidden in a pile of trash down below. If I were going to give your immediate future a mythic title, it might be Finding the Sacred in the Midst of the Profane. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I ve worked hard for many years to dismantle my prejudices. To my credit, I have even managed to cultivate compassion for people I previously demonized, like evangelical Christians, drunken jocks, arrogant gurus and career politicians. But I must confess that there s still one group toward which I m bigoted: super-rich bankers. I wish I could extend to them at least a modicum of amiable impartiality. How about you, Aquarius? Do you harbor any hidebound biases that shrink your ability to see life as it truly is? Have you so thoroughly rationalized certain narrow-minded perspectives and judgmental preconceptions that your mind is permanently closed? If so, now is a favorable time to dissolve the barriers and stretch your imagination way beyond its previous limits. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Are you lingering at the crux of the crossroads, restless to move on but unsure of which direction will lead you to your sweet destiny? Are there too many theories swimming around in your brain, clogging up your intuition? Have you absorbed the opinions of so many experts that you ve lost contact with your own core values? It s time to change all that. You re ready to quietly explode in a calm burst of practical lucidity. First steps: Tune out all the noise. Shed all the rationalizations. Purge all the worries. Ask yourself, What is the path with heart?

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26 rearend Restaurant Battle! three dishes try to outdo each other CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD Across 1 Cato s Stadiumgoer s wrap 10 Have braking problems 14 Sunburn remedy 15 Wooded shelter I ve been told 17 Buckwheat noodles 18 Meaty entree that beats 38-Across in reviews? 20 Parts of some car deals Smoked & Pickled Salmon Local Raspberry Mead EBS Organic Veggies Stainless Steel Food Mills Superb Deli Sandwiches Custom Cut Deli Meats Huge Truck Float Tubes The Exotic Grocery 22 Breakfast corner 23 I get the joke and it s funny but I have no time to write all this 24 Baton Rouge coll /2 x 11 size, for short 26 Told you so! 29 Piece thrown into the regular package 31 Threw off 33 Male deer 34 George of the Jungle creature 36 Singly 38 Leafy entree that beats 59-Across in reviews? 41 Computer user s customizable accessory 42 Winger of Winger 43 I m in indicator 44 Perlman of Matilda 46 Wheel of Fortune category 50 Show with a shortlived Cyber spinoff From Seed to Plate Commercial St. Highway 9 Van Zandt 51 Fresh, in Frankfurt 52 Contend (for) 54 Baby goat sound 55 Psychoanalytic subjects 57 Energy-producing row of turbines 59 Beefy stir-fry entree that beats 18-Across in reviews? 62 Duncan of Obama s cabinet 63 Crazy (Wilder/Pryor movie) 64 Speak eloquently 65 Astrophysicist degrasse Tyson 66 Tabloid pair, maybe 67 Fathered, as a foal 68 Don t budge Down 1 Rook s representation 2 Big name in bleach 3 Former Chevrolet model named after an element 4 Guide on the dance floor 5 Agra garments 6 Saturn s Greek counterpart 7 Here Come the (They Might Be Gi- Learn to ants kids album) 8 Soldier in 1950s news 9 Where hotel guests check in 10 Spotlighted section 11 Indonesian volcano that erupted in End of a belief? 13 Info one might keep private on Facebook, for short 19 Supporting 21 Pass 25 Fisheye, e.g. 27 Horse height measure 28 In this day and Pay boost 32 Rowdy crowd 33 Supernatural being inhabiting the air 35 They re downed to keep you up 37 Like some fishhooks 38 George, George, and George, to George Foreman 39 Adorable one, quaintly (and why does this always invoke sugary foods?) 40 Magnum, P.I. MEDITATE Free Meditation Instruction Monday evenings, 7:00 pm Open House Meditation & Talk 7pm/ 8pm meditation center bellingham.shambhala.org setting 41 Self-described selfdefense expert on It s Always Sunny in Philadelphia 45 Play an ace? 47 Inn, in Istanbul 48 Aslan s land 49 In a plucky manner gloom of night 53 Covered in body art 56 Disinfectant s target Last Week s Puzzle 2016 Jonesin Crosswords 57 What Not to 58 Aficionados 59 Omega s preceder 60 Verizon rival, initially 61 Dodeca- halved, then halved again CHUCKANUT BREWERY & KITCHEN August Locavore w/ Gazpacho Try Skagit Blonde Ale w/ 100% Skagit Malts Family Friendly HoPPY Hour Sunday-Thursday 4-6pm 601 West Holly St. Bellingham, WA BEERS ( ) ChuckanutBreweryAndKitchen.com

27 BY AMY ALKON THE ADVICE GODDESS CRAZY CAD LADY Four months ago, I started hooking up with this hot guy I met on Tinder. He isn t someone I d normally go for; he s a total mess and serious trouble. He always made me come to his place, and I always left feeling gross rather than satisfied. However, about once a month, I d feel attached and confess this to him. He d go into hiding, but he always came back for sex. The whole thing made me worried, anxious and sad, so I deleted his contact info, but I miss him and think about him constantly. How do I stay strong? If he texted me, I d just run back to his bed. Detoxing Sex that turns your stomach is a small price to pay for romance, like a man whispering sweet nothings in your ear: Just leave your coat on. This won t take long. Yes, it s pretty amazing to find yourself missing a man you dislike and maybe even despise. This probably comes out of how there s a potentially higher price for women from naked fun ending up with a sex dumpling (uh, child) and whoops, where did that Hunky McHunkington run off to, now that the kid needs food, diapers and a college education? Because women can get impregnated and abandoned, anthropologist John Marshall Townsend explains, female emotions evolved to act as an alarm system to monitor the quality and reliability of male investment and remedy deficiencies even when (women) try to be indifferent to investment. In a study of Townsend s I ve referenced before, even when women wanted nothing but a shag from some dude basically seeing him as useful meat they often found themselves fretting the morning after about whether he cared about them or only wanted sex. These women aren t mushy-minded idiots. Chances are, they ve been roofied into these feelings by their own bodies. Oxytocin a hormone associated with emotional bonding gets released in both men and women through cuddling, kissing and orgasm. However, men s far greater supply of testosterone especially when they aren t in a committed relationship can act as a sort of nightclub bouncer, blocking the uptake of oxytocin. As for the monthly pull this guy has on you, research by evolutionary psychologists Kelly Gildersleeve and Martie Haselton suggests that once a month during ovulation a woman seeking casual sex is more likely to be drawn to a cad s more masculine features (like a square jaw and a muscular build). As for how you might quit this particular cad, let s get real. Deleting somebody s number doesn t stop them from calling. You ve got to block his number. You might also use free smartphone apps like Productive, to motivate yourself by ticking off the days you ve gone cadless, and Clue, to track your ovulation. For added fortitude, make a list of the ways sex with him makes you feel. Being worried, anxious, sad and grossed out can sometimes be a reason to get a man over pronto but only if he s a miracle worker of a plumber. MEET JOE BLACKBOARD I ve been in love with my former highschool teacher for five years. We grew close when I was a student, but nothing physical happened. I m now an adult, and we talk frequently (and rather flirtatiously) on the phone. I would pursue him if he weren t married, with a family. Now I just need to admit my feelings to him and ask what his intentions ever were. I refuse to believe that he finds our constant chats to be completely innocent, and I don t think I can go on without telling him how crazy he s making me. Smitten When somebody at a cocktail party asks the guy What do you do? his answer isn t supposed to be My former students. Sure, you re now an adult. Unfortunately, he s still a husband. But never mind that; you ve got feelings clawing to get out. And that is a problem. James Pennebaker, who researches emotional expression, explains that actively holding back or inhibiting our thoughts and feelings can be hard work. It causes a lot of tension which is uncomfortable, making you long to release your pent-up feelings. In other words, a crushing need to be honest isn t necessarily courageous or noble. It s the psychological version of needing to pee. As for how Mr. Homeroom feels, probably like a guy whose wedding vows are supposed to trump hot for teacher. Luckily, there s a simple way to avoid the impulse to tell him how crazy he s making you: Cut off all contact. No doubt, it can be a highly rewarding thing for a teacher when his life is changed by a student except if that change is from happily married daddy to miserably separated dude living in his kids backyard playhouse. 2016, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved, Aug 19 & 20-7:00pm The Firehouse PAC,1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham BrownPaperTickets.com - AllegroVivace.us - telephone: Tickets: $25/$18 Program Includes Great Music by: Brahms, Bach, Neher Farm-to-Table with a French Twist Located at 1200 Cornwall in beautiful Bellingham on the corner of Chestnut EAT Restaurant and Bar invites you to enjoy nightly dinner specials, full bar with wine & beer, take out, catering, outdoor patio seating, live music Thursday through Saturday and friendly service! NEW HAPPY HOUR MENU Includes cheesy fries & press burger sliders! All our fries are hand cut fresh for you NOW OPEN MONDAYS Make reservations today players!...everyone was so expressive!...true virtuosos! 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28 rearend comix CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 Ready for adventure? Use your WECU Visa credit card for purchases and earn a cash back reward! 99%+ FOSSIL FUEL-FREE INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT Ronald Scott Colson CFP, MBA, President BellinghamFinancialPlanners.com COLSON FINANCIAL GROUP, INC., REGISTERED INVESTMENT ADVISOR Fee-Only Financial Planning Fee-Based Investment Management (Direct) (Toll Free) Austin Court Bellingham WA

29 Sudoku INSTRUCTIONS: Arrange the digits 1-9 so that each digit occurs once in each row, once in each column, and once in each box HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE (PG-13) 101m New from Director Taika Waititi (What We Do in the Shadows) "Warmly funny and deeply delightful, Wilderpeople is a tale of two misfits told with such generosity of spirit and consistent good humour that it s a pleasant surprise to discover how sneakily touching it is as well." Screen International Fri: (1:00), (4:15), 6:45, 9:15; Sat: (11:05AM), 4:15, 6:45, 9:00 Sun: (Noon), (3:15), 5:45, 8:15; Mon: (1:00), (4:15), 6:45, 9:15 Tue: (1:00), (3:30), 9:15; Wed: (1:00), (4:15), 9:15 Thu: (4:15), 6:45, 9:15 CAPTAIN FANTASTIC (R) 95m - In the PNW forests, a father devoted to raising his 6 kids with a rigorous physical and intellectual education is forced to leave his paradise and enter the world, challenging his idea of what it means to be a parent. Fri: (1:30), (3:30), 6:15, 9:00; Sat: (1:30), 3:30, 6:15, 9:15 Sun: (2:30), 5:15, 8:00; Mon: (1:30), (3:30), 6:15, 9:00 Tue: (12:45), (3:30), 6:15, 9:00; Wed: (1:30), (3:30), 6:15 Thu: (1:30), 6:15, 9:00 ROMEO AND JULIET (NR) 210m - Kenneth Branagh Theatre Reuniting the stars of his celebrated film Cinderella, Kenneth Branagh directs Richard Madden and Lily James in Shakespeare s heartbreaking tale of forbidden love. - Tix: $16 PFC Members / $20 GA / $10 Students Sun: 11:00AM; Tue: 6:30 CLASS OF '27 (NR) 53m - A look at those who overcome considerable odds to bring early education to impoverished rural America. Tue: (6:00) - Tickets are free, available at the box office only NOW PLAYING FRI, AUGUST 5 - THU, AUGUST 11 PICKFORD FILM CENTER 1318 Bay St Enjoy a drink while you watch! Mary's Happy Hour: M-F, 4-6pm $1 off Beer + Wine DYING TO KNOW: RAM DASS AND TIMOTHY LEARY (NR) 99m "They both saw themselves as adventurers exploring alternate realities, and hearing where they ended up is a trip all by itself." Fri: 6:15; Sat: 4:00; Sun: (3:15); Mon: 6:15; Tue: (4:00) Wed: 6:15; Thu: (4:00) THE MUSIC OF STRANGERS: YO-YO MA AND THE SILK ROAD ENSEMBLE (PG) 85m Celebrate the joy that can be achieved when people put aside their regional differences to create something beautiful. Fri: (1:40), (4:00), 8:40; Sat: (1:40), 6:20, 8:40 Sun: (1:00), 5:35, 8:00; Mon: (1:40), (4:00), 8:40 Tue: (1:40), 6:20, 8:40; Wed: (1:40), (4:00), 8:40 Thu: (1:40), 6:20, 8:40 PFC S LIMELIGHT CINEMA: 1416 Cornwall Ave. Parentheses ( ) denote bargain pricing CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 29

30 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD BY AMY KEPFERLE Glean Scene HOW DO YOU LIKE THEM APPLES? I recently came to the realization that the three giant bags of frozen Italian plums that are in my freezer from last summer s harvest will have to be moved soon to make way for the plums that are currently ripening on the fruit tree. I ve made plans to give the still-viable produce to friends which is likely what I ll also do with the frozen blackberries from last year, the zucchini I once again over-planted and whatever else is currently growing at accelerated rates. Judging by the responses I received on my Facebook page concerning the Great Plum Giveaway, a lot of people are in the same boat regarding the amount of fruit and vegetables they have in their possession in ratio to how much they can consume. ( We ll put them with the 10,000 Italian plums we already have, one friend commented.) I don t have any apple trees on my property, but if I did I d be giving serious consideration to Honey Moon Mead & Cider s second annual Bellingham Extra Cider- Head Project, which asks residents to contribute apples to the craft cider project from now through the end of September. In return, they ll receive a voucher for a portion of the finished product which is expected to be released in mid-october. Part community service, part pomological adventure, chow RECIPES REVIEWS PROFILES DONATE WHAT: Bellingham Extra Cider- Head Project WHERE: Honey Moon, 1053 N. State St. (in the alley) WHEN: Now through the end of September INFO: or moonmeads.com the goal of this project is to produce a quintessentially local hard cider from fruit that would otherwise go unharvested or unused the extra apples that are growing quite literally in our own backyards, Honey Moon s Anna Evans says. Those who want to donate their orbs to the cause can either drop off the fruit at Honey Moon s tasting room in the alley behind Pepper Sisters or contact the mead headquarters to have a crew come pluck the fruit. Even if you re not sure what kind of apples you have, Evans says they ll take them whether they re crab apples, gnarly apples or fruit from unidentified trees. In fact, last year s vintage contained juice from dozens of different varieties, including mystery fruit, all of which can add complexity and boost the acid profile of the finished cider, she says. In its first year, the finished product sold out quickly, and organizers are hoping to at least double the volume of this year s offering. So keep an eye on your apples, and consider sipping on the fruits of your labor. WED., AUG. 3 WEDNESDAY MARKET: Attend the Wednesday Market from 12-5pm at the Fairhaven Village Green, th St. SEDRO MARKET: The Sedro-Woolley Farmers Market takes place from 3-7pm at the town s Hammer Heritage Square, 640 Metcalf St. MARKET.COM BREWERS CRUISE: Tonight s Bellingham Bay BREWers Cruise will feature liquid fare from Boundary Bay Brewery, 192 Brewing, and Structures Brewing starting at 6:30pm at San Juan Cruises dock at the Bellingham Cruise Terminal, 355 Harris Ave. Entry is $39. THURS., AUG. 4 PIONEER PICNIC: Attend the Skagit County Pioneer Association s 112th annual Pioneer Picnic from 11am-2pm at La Conner s Pioneer Park (near the Rainbow Bridge). In addition to a barbecue salmon lunch, the event will feature live music, stories by oldtimers, historic pictures, a historian s memorial pamphlet, a meeting, a flag salute and more. Entry is $12. BOW LITTLE MARKET: Peruse produce and more when 30-plus vendors sell their wares at the Bow Little Market from 1-6pm at the Belfast Feed Store, 6200 N. Green (south of Bow Hill Rd.). FRI., AUG. 5 FERNDALE MARKET: Local vendors and farmers will sell their wares at the Ferndale Farmers Market from 1-6pm at 2007 Cherry St. SALMON DINNER SAIL: Combine your tastes for adventure and delicious food when the three-hour Bellingham Bay Salmon Dinner Sail returns this week aboard the Schooner Zodiac leaving at 6pm from the Bellingham Cruise Terminal, 355 Harris Ave. Tickets are $59-$79. WINE, MUSIC, MOVIE: Show up at 6pm for live music and Chateau Montelena wine tastings at Artifacts Cafe and Wine Bar, located inside Whatcom Museum s Lightcatcher Building, 250 Flora St. At 8pm, watch the wine-centric movie Bottle Shock. Entry is free. SAT., AUG. 6 PANCAKE BREAKFAST: Start your Drayton Harbor Days off right at a Pancake Breakfast taking place from 8-11am at the Blaine Community Center, 763 G St. Entry is $4-$6. ANNIVERSARY PARTY: Chef Andy doit Nguyen of Drizzle Lynden will serve sliders with Twin Sisters Whatcom Blue cheese as part of an one-year anniversary party taking place from 12-5pm at Lynden s Twin Sisters Creamery, 6202 Portal Way. The event will also feature live music, new cheese releases and artisan favorites. ANACORTES MARKET: The Anacortes Farmers Market happens from 9am-2pm at the Depot Arts Center, 611 R Ave. MOUNT VERNON MARKET: The Mount Vernon Farmers Market takes place from 9am-2pm Saturdays through Oct. 15 at the city s Riverfront Plaza. FARMERSMARKET.ORG BLAINE MARKET: Procure produce, crafts, food from vendors and more at the Blaine Gardeners Market from 10am-2pm at 685 Peace Portal Dr. BELLINGHAM MARKET: Attend the Bellingham Farmers Market from 10am- 3pm every Saturday through Dec. 17 at the Depot Market Square, 1100 Railroad Ave. FERNDALE UNCORKED: Enjoy specially selected Washington wines, hors d oeuvres and music at the third annual Ferndale Uncorked taking place from 4-7pm on the lawn at Christ Lutheran Church, 5904 Vista Dr. Tickets are $25-$30; funds raised benefit the Interfaith Coalition and the Ferndale Community Meal. (360) NW WINE FESTIVAL: Brigadoon Service Dogs, in collaboration with Growing Veterans, presents the Bellingham Northwest Wine Festival from 7-10pm at Four Points by Sheraton, 714 Lakeway Dr. Entry to Bellingham s first competitive wine festival which will feature as many as 35 wineries from the Pacific Northwest is $55-$75. FESTIVAL.COM MON., AUG. 8 WE GROW MARKET: The We Grow Market Stand sells its wares from 3-5pm in front of Northwest Youth Services, 1020 N. State St. TUES., AUG. 9 CANNING 101: Learn how to stretch your food dollars and enjoy seasonal flavors all year long in a three-session Canning 101 demonstration class with Certified Master Food Preserve Susy Hymas staring tonight from 6:30-8pm at the Community Food Co-op, 1220 N. Forest St. The class continues Aug. 16 and 23. Entry is $59.

31 BRUNCH COCKTAILS TACOS OYSTERS PATIO DAILY HAPPY HOUR BELLINGHAM S PREMIER SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1145 NORTH STATE STREET IN THE HISTORIC HERALD BUILDING DINNER Tuesday - Sunday 3-11 BRUNCH Saturday - Sunday SKAGIT VALLEY CASINO U.S.I.T. SHOP CIGARETTES & SMOKELESS TOBACCO $53 Discounted Cigarettes All Major Brands & Generics 00 - $ 81 50* PER CARTON INCLUDES TAX! LOWEST PRICES IN THE AREA! on most brands EXPRESS DRIVE-THRU 7 am 9 pm 7 days a week CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD On I-5 at Exit 236 *Price at time of printing. Limit five cartons/rolls per customer per day. Must have valid ID. Cigarettes are not legal for resale. Prices subject to change. No Returns. Skagit Valley Casino Resort and U.S.I.T. Tobacco Shop owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe. SURGEON GENERAL S WARNING: Quitting Smoking Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risks to Your Health. CW

32 New Members Receive: $ 5 Free-Play! Sign Up Today T HE PACIFIC SHOWROOM THURSDAYS, AUG. 4, 11 & 18 UP TO $1,000 drawings 2 pm - 7 pm $15,000 $5,000 at 8 pm P AM TILLIS & LORRIE MORGAN SEPTEMBER 16 & 17 8 PM Purchase show tickets at the Casino Box Office service charge free. GRAND PRIZES INCLUDE: 3 piece power reclinerr 70 Vizio Smart TV CW CASINO RESORT theskagit.com On I-5 Exit Must be 21 or older with valid ID. Details at Rewards Club. Management reserves all rights. Skagit Valley Casino Resort owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe. HAPPY HOUR SUN - THURS 5 PM - 7 PM FRI & SAT 9 PM- 1 AM

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